Anaconda water jerries

Submitted: Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 12:35
ThreadID: 134242 Views:2793 Replies:2 FollowUps:14
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Hi all,

Just after some info regarding water jerry cans from Anaconda. Was browsing their range the other day and noticed those dark green 'army' style 20lt jerries, 'Bush Tracks' is the brand. Anyway, I couldn't find a manufacturer's stamp anywhere on the can itself, usually you can see at least the plastic type (HDPE #2 or something). But nothing at all.

The distributor is an army surplus company, ACOM International. On their website they state that the can is BPA free, so I'm assuming that at least food-grade plastic is being used. But I still can't find out who makes them and where. The printed label says Made in Australia. Perhaps I'm just being too anal.

One thing that I was pleased with is the lack of 'plastic' smell inside the can itself, compared to other branded cans/containers sold by a few other stores. But of course the whiff test probably isn't conclusive.

So if anyone uses the Anaconda 'Bush Track' jerries, I'd like to know what your experiences are with them + and -.

Thanks,

Tim.
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:09

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:09
Hi Tim,
I assume you are talking about the ones with the tap under the lid?
Anaconda also sell a similar jerrycan with two black caps on top of different sizes.
But I have the ones with the one wider cap.
The reason I bought them is because you can drill out the cap to fit a hand pump, which I have made up. I carry two on the back of our camper to supplement the 59 litre main water tank. I have a spare cap with a hand pump and hose made up which I can swap over and use without removing the jerrycan from the rack. Have had the original two for a little over two years and the water inside tastes as pure as when it comes out of the tap at home.
There are wear marks on them from rubbing on the mounting racks and I have recently bought two more to take on an 8 week Pilbara/Kimberley trip we are embarking on in mid April. I just want to make sure I have two sound jerrycans that will last the trip without any hassle.
No negatives I can think of apart from wearing on the steel racks they sit in. I think they move a bit and rub on the weld beads. Not real deep marks but I don't want to take the chance. The last two recent ones I bought were $19.95 each so well worth the money.
The label (still attached) shows ACOM International Melbourne Aust.
Bill


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AnswerID: 608271

Follow Up By: Mudripper - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:16

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:16
Hi Sand Man,

Thanks for your reply. Yes I saw the double-capped version, but I'm definitely looking at the single wide-capped one with, as you say, the tap under the lid.

Wear and tear shouldn't be a problem in my case, as they will be going inside my 80 series behind the front seats (can fit four across just nicely).

Going for $19.99 at the moment, so yes a great buy indeed.

Cheers,

Tim.
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FollowupID: 878022

Follow Up By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Monday, Feb 06, 2017 at 16:10

Monday, Feb 06, 2017 at 16:10
years ago I found that a section of truck inner tube would slide over a jerry can. I have done this for many of them - it helps protect the plastic ones from abrasion and keeps the metal ones from making noise when they are stacked together.
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FollowupID: 878077

Follow Up By: lancie49 - Monday, Feb 06, 2017 at 18:53

Monday, Feb 06, 2017 at 18:53
Alastair, no inducement of rust on the cans after being covered with the tube ?
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FollowupID: 878078

Follow Up By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Tuesday, Feb 07, 2017 at 14:24

Tuesday, Feb 07, 2017 at 14:24
Yes rust could be an issue but back then I had lots of energy and my regular maintenance included rubbing down problem spots and brushing on cold gal.

I now have all my fuel and water in permanent tanks and only use jerries on rare occasions.

I still see a lot in use however and even the cheapies seem to last quite well.

The clear plastic ones have always worried me for the reasons stated of algae and becoming brittle with sun exposure. I had a couple mounted on the rear corners of my early S3 Landrover. I was manoeuvring in the main street of a small town trying to turn round and backed into a tree. The explosion as one of the water jerries fractured brought life to the street !!!
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FollowupID: 878118

Reply By: Sigmund - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:15

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:15
I've used the green 20l std jerry and found it OK. Water's sat in it for a week or so. It's stronger than the alternatives which was essential.
AnswerID: 608272

Follow Up By: Mudripper - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:18

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:18
Thanks Sigmund, yes I agree the green ones certainly look/feel stronger than the light blue or clear ones available elsewhere.
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FollowupID: 878023

Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:28

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 15:28
Algae grows in the light blue or white ones.
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FollowupID: 878024

Follow Up By: Mudripper - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 16:32

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 16:32
Yep, guess that's the reason why caravan water tanks are usually black/non transparent.
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FollowupID: 878025

Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 17:41

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 17:41
Track Trailer always used to use black hoses as well, not sure if they still do.

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FollowupID: 878027

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 18:32

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 18:32
The good thing about the light blue willow ones is that you always know how much is left. Used these cans for 30 years and never had algae - usually have them inside the vehicle and not exposed to too much light and I put chlorinated tap water in them. My daughter had a couple and moved to Brisbane - the plastic went brittle and the jerrys cracked but they were 15 years old. But that was the only problem I've seen. I agree that its good having the wide lid - can drop a whale pump in there to transfer water if you wish and I have a syphon type trigger hose for everyday use.
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FollowupID: 878028

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 20:46

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 20:46
Just to add that you wouldn't know if you had algae if you have black tanks and black hoses!
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FollowupID: 878033

Follow Up By: Mudripper - Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 21:38

Saturday, Feb 04, 2017 at 21:38
Out of sight out of mind LOL.

Living in a rural area, we rely solely on tank water. Our tanks are either FRP or poly tanks. They all stand in the full sun, and the water can remain in the tanks for long periods of time without drainage, years in fact. Individual tank capacity ranges from 2,000lt to 25,000lt. We have nearly 100,000lt in total.

Every few years I'll drain the tanks (sequentially) and remove sediment (minimal). However, in the 15 years I've never come across any algae. Maybe any potential algae is killed off by the natural 'additives' (or flavours if you like, you get my drift) contained in the tank water. The only way sunlight can get in is through the tank inlet, which is 400mm in diameter. The only substance that I've come across inside the tank is pollen from nearby gum trees, which floats on the surface.

I wonder perhaps this algae problem that some people experience is maybe due to the quality of the water? Certainly sunlight does play a role - look at fishponds or poorly maintained swimming pools, etc.

Cheers
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FollowupID: 878035

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Feb 05, 2017 at 21:54

Sunday, Feb 05, 2017 at 21:54
The other issue with clear or pale coloured tanks is UV stability ....... plain and simple it is simply not possible to make a transparent product that is long term UV stable.

Long term UV stable products are all opaque and mostly darker colours.

cheers
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FollowupID: 878059

Follow Up By: lancie49 - Monday, Feb 06, 2017 at 18:57

Monday, Feb 06, 2017 at 18:57
I've been using white/clear 10 and 20ltr drums for water for the last 6-7yrs without any issues, algae, taste or anything else.
They are generally kept in the vehicle or Teardrop most of the time so UV is not a concern for us.
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FollowupID: 878079

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Monday, Feb 06, 2017 at 22:50

Monday, Feb 06, 2017 at 22:50
6 or 7 years is not long term ....... if they are otherwise protected well ... all good.
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FollowupID: 878098

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