I wonder What These Are For?

Submitted: Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:08
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Good Afternoon Everyone

For those that like to be kept up to date, here is a sneak preview of the 2 New Memorial structures that are being constructed in Port Augusta for the 100th Anniversary of the joining of the Rails at Ooldea on the 17th October this year.
I know one thing, once they are bolted in place, they should be there in another 100 years time.

So if you want to be part of a very important 100th Anniversary, set this date in concrete and see you there.


Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Members - Bow & Nan - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:20

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:20
SA, not enough power to weld them in place.
"Work interferes with living"

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:33

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:33
Hi Bow

Your not wrong there.....lol

They will be bolted to the original cement slabs that are in place.



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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 16:20

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 16:20
Ahh, they'll get it welded up, no worries!

They'll truck it down to the shipyard, and finish welding it up with this new $20M generator "they" are going to set up.

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 17:34

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 17:34
I found a link re the "supplementary" generator.

According to This report by the ABC it will be built by the "we". It's not clear if the "we" is the Fed Government or the Department of Defence, although I suppose they really ar one and the same.

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Anthony
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Reply By: Member - Rustygq - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:23

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:23
What great news this has absolutely made my day.

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:36

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 14:36
Hi Rusty

As you may know, the original memorial were constructed of timber and were unveiled as part of the 50th anniversary back in 1967.

These new ones made of steel should stand the elements of time and be there for a very long time.

I hope you have plans to be at the unveiling on the 17th October.

As they say, see you there, or be square.




Cheers




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Follow Up By: Member - Rustygq - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 18:24

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 18:24
I'll be there, or ded. ;-) Already have it marked on the wall planner and plans in hand. Yep I well knew they were made of timber and saw them fall into disrepair from when I took this pick in '90 to just a pile of firewood in 2012. These new ones will stand the test of time and a mark of a very important milestone in our history. I have a book called (I think) Road Across the Wilderness. It tells the story of the building of the line. Interesting book. Just cant find it at the moment.

Cheers Russ

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 19:42

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 19:42
Hi Rusty

That will be great and it should be great to catch up with a lot of members from ExplorOz.


See you there.


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Reply By: lancie49 - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 16:15

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 16:15
Well Stephen, once again one of your posts hat got me in the mood for some research.
I wasn't aware of this celebration, or the actual event it acknowledges, but it was obviously a very important step in the growing of Australia.
Thanks for bringing it to our attention.

http://www.rdawep.org.au/trans-australian-railway-centenary/
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 18:17

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 18:17
Hi Lancie

I have been putting a few posts here on the forum for some time now and for me, it is an event that is of National significance.

Prior to the joining of the rails, the only way people and good could get into Western Australia was by foot, camel teams or ocean steamers, as motor vehicles could not get fuel on the goat track that crossed the Nullabor at that time.

Australian young men were being killed in their thousands on the Western Front in Europe, yet they were able to get large teams of men to undertake this enormous task of building the link to join the two states of South Australia and Western Australia for the very first time in living history.

I hope this has inspired you to make the trip this October.


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Follow Up By: splits - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 20:57

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 20:57
" Prior to the joining of the rails, the only way people and good could get into Western Australia was by foot, camel teams or ocean steamers, as motor vehicles could not get fuel on the goat track that crossed the Nullabor at that time."

There was at least two cars that got through prior to 1917. One was driven by Francis Birtles in 1912. The car was an American Brush with a single cylinder 10 hp engine, coil spring suspension front and rear and a wood chassis. They had pre arranged fuel supplies to be waiting for them at regular intervals.

It took them 28 days to drive from Fremantle to Sydney.

In 1915 a Studebaker driven by Hugh Fraser, P.W. Armstrong and John Burton took only 9 days to do the same trip. They had fuel waiting for them in some places but they could not arrange for any at Balladonia so they carried an additional 100 litres from Kalgoorlie to take them from Baladiona to their next stop.

Some of the spares they carried were two rear axles, one front stub axle, one front spring, piston rings, magneto parts, an assortment of nuts, bolts, screws, split pins, and a piece of sheet copper and rivets to repair any holes in the engine crankcase.

The car weighed 1400 kg but when loaded for this trip it was 2500kg.

I can't help thinking life was a bit more exciting in those days.

This information came from the book titled "Australians On The Road " by Pedr Davis 1979.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 23:09

Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 at 23:09
Hi splits

I did they say how or who made the fuel drops?

One could only guess that it would have been by the teams of camels that carried important supplies all through the arid and remote places all around Australia at that time.

Once the rails were joined, it opened up Western Australia and all those small communities for the very first time, and this is why this is such an historic event.

Make sure you have the date marked on your calendar .



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Follow Up By: Member - Rustygq - Monday, Feb 13, 2017 at 08:38

Monday, Feb 13, 2017 at 08:38
Hi Splits
Very interesting little peice of info. I find all that history of our early travel fascinating. I have travelled the Nullarbor many times, still 300 miles of dirt in the early 70s and always marvelled at people being out there before there was even a graded track and fuel supplies.
Thank you, will google that book.
Russ

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Feb 13, 2017 at 14:59

Monday, Feb 13, 2017 at 14:59
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My parents, with a another couple, drove from Adelaide to Perth and return in 1949 in a Vauxhall Velox. The entire road was of course unsealed.
How the hell they managed it is beyond my understanding, but they did!
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: splits - Monday, Feb 13, 2017 at 20:25

Monday, Feb 13, 2017 at 20:25
Thank you, will google that book.
Russ

I saw one 18 months ago in a barber's shop and decided to see if I could find one on Ebay. There were three for sale..

I just checked Ebay again and there are .still some there.


Ebay books
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Follow Up By: splits - Monday, Feb 13, 2017 at 20:27

Monday, Feb 13, 2017 at 20:27
Hi splits

I did they say how or who made the fuel drops?


No but I also thing camels would have had something to do with it.
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2017 at 16:17

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2017 at 16:17
As a kid, I did a trip from Adelaide to almost Mundrabilla and back with a group exploring caves in 1954.





Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Rustygq - Thursday, Feb 16, 2017 at 09:38

Thursday, Feb 16, 2017 at 09:38
I know we have gone a bit off thread but I find all this stuff very interesting. A family I worked for in Esperence in the early 70s had moved over there from Tatura. They went with a car, an old ford truck loaded with lots a machinery and gear and a Chamblin 9G tractor towing a trailer also loaded with gear. The 9G had a top speed of about 20MPH. What an adventure.

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Follow Up By: Member - Rustygq - Thursday, Feb 16, 2017 at 09:59

Thursday, Feb 16, 2017 at 09:59
Splits
Thanks very much,I have just ordered on on Ebay
Cheers
Rusty

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Reply By: Member - mechpete - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2017 at 13:19

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2017 at 13:19
hi Stephen
they look good an can,t wait for the big day
cheers mechpete
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2017 at 14:03

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2017 at 14:03
Hi Pete

Like you, Fiona and I can not wait to be back there again.

From all accounts and from what Murray has been telling me, there should be a good crowd to witness this historic event.


See you there.


Cheers



Stephen and Fiona
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