Tyre value calculator from Coopers

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 18:29
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Reply By: Geoff H9 - Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 19:28

Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 19:28
This is an advertisment. Doesn't seem appropriate for this forum.
AnswerID: 609586

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 20:49

Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 20:49
I have no connection of any sort with Coopers.

Anyone can take this formula, hunt for the wear and grip tags, and do the numbers with any make and model of tyre.

This is no more advertising than links that've been posted to Coopers' pressure guide.
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FollowupID: 879449

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 19:36

Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 19:36
A very narrow view.
In Europe, every tyre sold must come with a rating label (which does not include wear).
http://www.tyre-label-values.com/generator/www/start/tyre_label/start_en.html
We had a very clear example of this. We fitted 2 tyres in Hungary that increased the fuel consumption by 1.5L/100km.
At the prices we were paying for fuel, that equalled $750 in 20,000km, or 2.5 times the cost of the 2 tyres.
There is more to tyre cost than the cost of the tyres and how long they last.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
AnswerID: 609587

Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 19:48

Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 19:48
A friend of mine out Mickey Thompson MTZs on his GU Patrol, they increased his consumption by 3l/100km. He didn't my leave them on long!

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FollowupID: 879444

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 20:22

Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 20:22
The UTQG is apparently applied in all countries.

Not though to proper 4by tyres it seems.

(And I have trouble with crits of a formula for not encompassing data that's not publicly or readily available.)
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FollowupID: 879447

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 13:56

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 13:56
Shaker an aspect of fitting larger tires such as going from an HT to an AT or then a Mud tire such as an MTZ is that even though the tire size is the same in reality it is not in overall radius , every even slight increase changes the speedo and odometer reading to what 'seems' to be a detriment of fuel economy …..Toyota is renowned for being 4km under at 100km from factory with factory tires , the only way to check if fuel economy has changed is by GPS distance pre & post tire change.
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FollowupID: 879463

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 14:05

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 14:05
You'll also find that the width figure applies to the max cross section not the tread. The tread width varies affecting rolling resistance and so also fuel consumption.
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FollowupID: 879464

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 14:30

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 14:30
There is no doubt that tread design has a significant effect on fuel consumption (more aggressive generally = more fuel) as does casing design (stiffer side walls = more fuel).
I run Michelin XDE2s on the OKA. Tour operators report over 100,000km with these and I typically get 80,000km, but on a few roads I can destroy them very fast by extreme chipping if I let the speeds creep up.

Every tyre is a compromise.
The best one for this vehicle and this trip is a bad choice for this vehicle next trip.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
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FollowupID: 879465

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 19:21

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 19:21
The problem is a 'perceived' increase in fuel use due to the difference in ODO readings after fitting slightly larger / aggressive tires…as stated above , Toyota has forever and a day set their speedo a 4km HIGHER than distance / speed actually travelled on factory fitted tires .EG Speedo reading 100klm per hr the vehicle is actually travelling at 96klm per hr but the ODO reads 100km traveled, Now when a slightly larger tire is fitted [ 4% ] the speedo gets to read true [100 =100 ] BUT in Toyotas at least the ODO now reads 4klm LESS per 100KM actually travelled giving the perception of less km per lt….General 'perceived' fuel usage increase due to tires is in fact much of an "urban myth" due to the fact the ODO now measures the actual distance travelled 4% lower ...
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 19:28

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 19:28
Nope.
Fuel consumption (real, corrected) between tyres can vary enormously.
Yes, the odometer accuracy must be established for each one.
Try a set of cross plies and see how you go after correction.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
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FollowupID: 879473

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 at 04:43

Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 at 04:43
This formula addresses expected tyre life, not impact on fuel consumption.
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 at 10:23

Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 at 10:23
The formulae is supposedly comparing tyre value - in $$$$s - and there is more to value than kms of life that is why in my opening post I described it as a narrow view.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
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FollowupID: 879491

Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:30

Sunday, Mar 26, 2017 at 11:30
Alloy c/t, both my friend & myself are very aware of the correct way of checking fuel economy, FYI he used GPS to record distances & he used the same diesel pump at the service station. The weather conditions & altitudes were also very much the same.

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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 21:05

Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 21:05
May we point out that one of the Rules of the Forum is that you must refrain from click baiting others - ie. don't just post a link without any supporting information about what the link contains or why you've posted the link.
Michelle Martin
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AnswerID: 609592

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 21:15

Tuesday, Mar 21, 2017 at 21:15
I would've thought the heading was pretty clear.
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FollowupID: 879451

Reply By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 10:54

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 10:54
Not exactly truthful

Look at the 200 series comparison

They work out that the Dunlop AT22 is $336 per tyre and the Cooper is $369 per tyre. They also say that the AT22 only has 10.1mm of tread. A quick google shows that model AT22 has 12mm of tread.

Also you can get AT22's for $249 fitted without any haggling. The best I got for a coopers was $385 per tyre. Of course Cooper tell their dealers not to discount. I'd love to see where you can get that cooper tyre for $369!!!

So by Coopers calculations based on reality, not their fictitious numbers, you waste $113 per tyre or about $564 for 5 tyres if you buy Coopers.

13.1 / 12 * 249 = $271 (you would need to spend on coopers)
but you actually spend $385
Add to that that lots of people get terrific mileage from their AT22's ( on road).

More Cooper lies. Typical.



AnswerID: 609597

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 13:03

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 13:03
No way on Earth has an AT22 12mm of tread depth ,no matter what mr Google says ,further more Coopers do discount IF you ask nicely, was originally quoted $350 X 5 when wanting 265 / 70 / 17 , ok .. fitem ,,, 5 min later ,sorry only have 3 in stock ,but can give you 5 x 285 / 70 / 17 which are normally $389 ea for the same as previous quote and will do wheel alignment in deal ….70,000 k later still have 6mm tread depth measured from ON TOP of the wear indicator bar.
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FollowupID: 879459

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 18:12

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 18:12
Try pricing the 285 65 17, the one they have in the formula. Even so, with that price, you only waste about $500 buying Coopers by their calculations.
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FollowupID: 879471

Reply By: Blown4by - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 10:58

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 10:58
The formula is of little value when the treads peel off on bitumen at ambients below 35°C, no load and not towing anything.
AnswerID: 609598

Reply By: Member - Bigfish - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 12:32

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 12:32
The examples quoted by Coopers where comparing aftermarket tyres with original factory fitted tyres. We all know that factory fitted never get good mileage as they are generally a softer compound. I got 26,000klms from my original Geolander 61.....as expected. Not really a valid test in my opinion. Lets see them compare against Toyo, Goodrich etc.etc...
AnswerID: 609601

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 13:24

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 13:24
It's not a test. It's a formula - using ratings and dollars.
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FollowupID: 879460

Follow Up By: Member - Bigfish - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 13:53

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 13:53
Alright its a formula...a very one sided formula that will always favour coopers when selective tyres are chosen...Nothing more than advertising crap. Anyone who seriously uses this formula to decide which coopers tyre suits them is completely gullible to anything...imho.
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FollowupID: 879462

Follow Up By: Blown4by - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 23:28

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 23:28
A not commonly known fact is that some tyre manufacturers produce a specific tyre with less tread depth for factory fitment OEM use. The same tyres retailed and sold to the public have a deeper tread depth. Its not about the dollars, its about the dollars.
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FollowupID: 879478

Follow Up By: Sigmund - Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 at 04:38

Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 at 04:38
Big fish - we can assume that grip and wear ratings are assigned by the manufacturer. Anyone can lie to make a tyre look better if they think they can get away with it.

But this formula isn't Cooper-specific.
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FollowupID: 879479

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Mar 26, 2017 at 12:27

Sunday, Mar 26, 2017 at 12:27
Like pretty much everything Cooper publish it is biased to suit coopers sales advantage.

It is an over simplistic mostly invalid throw away piece of advertising rubbish, ( puffery I think is the technical term) like most of what cooper publish to try and convince people that their fairly average product is worth paying far more for. ..... pretty much standard US sale practice.

Like their Km guarantee ........ look at the terms ........ then compare what people actually get out of similar tyres ....... ignoring the fact that hard tyres and old school patterns are mostly not a good performance choice.

Like their 4psi rule, that so many consider gospel ....... their 4psi rule simply does not work reliably on all size and construction tyres on all vehicles ...... if you have a light vehicle with tyres running very low in the load range it does not work AT ALL.

just like selling people tyres based on how much of what sort of work they do ...... it has no basis in fact or practicality ....... it is a spurious sales tool nothing more nothing less. .... the premise is that if you are serious about 4wd and remote area safety you will pay more for a more aggressive tyre.

they want their customers baffled by bullshit ........ because if people dealt in and understood the real facts they would realize that, especially in Australia Cooper tyres are heavily overpriced ..... like most US derived products in Australia

In my experience and in my opinion, no matter what the purpose or the tyre compared, especially in Australia there is a better tyre at a lower cost from another more experienced manufacturer.

cheers
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FollowupID: 879564

Reply By: Batt's - Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 21:34

Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017 at 21:34
Excellent tyre calculator from Coopers because they make my Kumho KL78's A/T's look fantastic compared to their A/T tyre which is approx $100 dearer per tyre and has 13.1 mm of tread where my Kumho's have a 17 mm tread depth.
AnswerID: 609609

Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 at 07:18

Thursday, Mar 23, 2017 at 07:18
Sometimes it all becomes a little "academic"...

I've staked two sidewalls in recent times beyond sensible repair with three-quarter tread on them. No amount of calculations resolves that, my experience says it all becomes a bit of luck on tyre choice - some will be better at the margin.

Find a tyre you like most and stick with it.

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
AnswerID: 609615

Reply By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Friday, Mar 24, 2017 at 01:30

Friday, Mar 24, 2017 at 01:30
Hmmm..... Coopers - twice the life - half the wet weather traction!

Kerry W (Qld)
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AnswerID: 609647

Follow Up By: Member - kyle46 - Saturday, Mar 25, 2017 at 16:35

Saturday, Mar 25, 2017 at 16:35
Exactly,
I would rather a tyre that has grip rather one is going to last forever.

That awesome hard wearing tyre won't be a saving you money when you're slid off the road
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FollowupID: 879546

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Mar 26, 2017 at 18:56

Sunday, Mar 26, 2017 at 18:56
From the information I have .... Cooper use fairly old rubber compounds and pretty crude tread patterns.
Many of the European and Asian compaines that are many times bigger and have more R&D resources are using modern compounds that result in a softer tyre that does not rely on being hard, to wear well, they also use some pretty clever tread patterns that work better without looking as aggressive and sacrificing on road performance and wet weather traction.

these clever tread patters look finer, but their off road traction is better and because of the shapes of the voids they clear better than cruder patterns.

big double page adds in every 4wd mag and free tyres to any personality that asks, don't make a good tyre.

cheers
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FollowupID: 879587

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