First Aid

Submitted: Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 02:53
ThreadID: 134599 Views:2659 Replies:6 FollowUps:15
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Hi there,

As we get closer to our year long loop of Australia we are getting the last few things while my broken foot heals. I'm after a recommendation on a first aid kit that includes an invenomation kit.

Regards Duzzy
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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 06:51

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 06:51
I think it is worth investing in a first aid course first.

I think you can get snake venom id kits but not antivenom kits. Snake identification is not easy and you should study sanke types and habitat.

IMHO your best defence is
-remote travel first aid course
-Sat phone and PLB
-Information on Snakes and ID
-Then a good, appropriate First Aid Kit.
-A visit to the doctor to get some strong antibiotics for skin wounds and burns, diarrhea and flu as well as string pain killers. If you have a good relationship with a doctor he / she will prescribe these.


If you do the course, you will have a good idea of which kit to get.
AnswerID: 609930

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 07:49

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 07:49
Good reply, and akin to what I posted to the OPs same thread on 4x4 Earth.

Posted a few links to first aid kit threads over there, and advised . . .

As an ex snake catcher, who still gets to go see friends and family with snake problems, just get a couple of good long 4" wide compression bandages.
You can splint a limb with just about anything and normal bandages in a first aid kit.

The really important thing is the first aid course, Senior First Aid or better still, after obtaining the basic certificate, do something like Advanced Outdoor First Aid, Wilderness First Aid etc.
These courses go into more depth with assisting patients in areas out of range of fast ambulance services.
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FollowupID: 879814

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 07:58

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 07:58
Thanks, my advice may even be better without the spelling mistakes....

I think it is worth investing in a first aid course first.

I think you can get snake venom id kits but not antivenom kits. Snake identification is not easy and you should study snake types and habitat.

IMHO your best defence is
-remote travel first aid course
-Sat phone and PLB
-Information on Snakes and ID
-Then a good, appropriate First Aid Kit.
-A visit to the doctor to get some strong antibiotics for skin wounds and burns, diarrhea and flu as well as strong pain killers. If you have a good relationship with a doctor he / she will prescribe these.


If you do the course, you will have a good idea of which kit to get.
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FollowupID: 879815

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 08:04

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 08:04
You don't need anything other than the compression bandages for snake bite (which is also the treatment for most of our venomous spiders too), pressure / immobilisation, splint limb (if applicable), and get help asap.

Anitvenom has a short shelf life, and isn't always needed, definitely needs to be administered in a hospital if possible, but can be administered by a vet if situation is dire.

If you do everything right, they simply cut away the bandages in hospital where the bit occurred (the X on the bandage) do a swab and test.
Then a poly or mono antivenom will be at hand if needed.
Many bites are 'dry' but you just never know.

I am sure the advanced first aid courses should cover the correct pressure immobilisation, they might not cover all the little tips / tricks / knowledge of an advanced course, or the training like a snake catcher gets with their internal programmes.
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FollowupID: 879816

Follow Up By: Steve in Kakadu - Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 20:49

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 20:49
You can have a tool kit but if you don't know how to use it, it is useless.
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FollowupID: 879891

Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 20:14

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 20:14
I bought one of the Bob Cooper snake bite kits from the Exploroz shop, Duzzy.

Have spent most of my working life in remote locations, and often in high snake density areas, and only recall one snake bite victim. He was bitten by a Mulga Snake that crawled into his swag, and survived a lengthy vehicle/Cessna trip to Tennant Creek hospital. Aware of another 3 or 4 "snake in swag" incidents with no bites occurring. Snake bite is a proactive thing...........don't get into a situation where you will/might get bitten.

Ailments I'd be more concerned about are burns, sprains, breaks, dehydration and anything that might immobilise the, often only, driver. There is a silver ointment, script only, that is magic for burns, can't recall the name. Imodium, Staminade, strong pain killers(Endone comes to mind!), dental floss for sutures(and your teeth of course) and suitable curved needle for said sutures etc, etc.

St Johns have a variety of kits, as well as some of the industrial PPE suppliers. There's heaps of choice out there.

Safe travels,

Bob



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Reply By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 21:10

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 21:10
As said, the best first aid kid is knowledge. Make sure you both do a course - one of you may be in need of first aid.

Carry compression bandages and clips to hold them in place, in case of snake bite. I carry these in my backpack as well as in the first aid box.

We rarely see snakes on our travels - we see more in our back yard at home.

When in the Kimberley we were told that the snakes came out during the wet season when there are frogs and other dietary favourites in abundance. This is when tourists usually aren't there.

When walking take usual precautions; boots, thick socks, avoid long grass, look where you are walking. If you see a snake, freeze. That way you are no longer a threat to the snake.

I make up my own kit of first aid supplies and this is only basic stuff. I have instant hot and cold packs in the car (one use), and a re-usable cold pack in the caravan freezer.
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Follow Up By: Member - Robyn R4 - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 21:41

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2017 at 21:41
I was just about to say exactly that...both of you should do the course.
Both of my parents taught St Johns First Aid (my father was once a medic in the army).
Besides the medical stuff I learned from them over the years and the courses and refreshers I've taken myself, they also drilled Murphy's Law into me...if only one person has learned first aid, how will they be able to instruct when they're unconscious, for example?!

:) Robyn
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Reply By: The Bantam - Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 11:40

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 11:40
Above all ... any decent first aid kit should have at least 3 good quality 4 inch compression type bandages.

these 3 bandages are capable of dealing with many serious situations about as well as any non qualified person can.

cheers
AnswerID: 609975

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 15:44

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 15:44
Just don't confuse the usual 3" or 4" thin crepe bandages for compression bandages, the latter are not usually supplied in any first aid kit I've ever seen.
You need 2 long bandages, even 3 to play it safe, as the whole limb needs to be moderately pressurised to severely restrict lymphatic fluid flow.
If the bandages are applied too tight or too loose, you are going to be in trouble one way or the other.
Best to practice on oneself and leave the bandages on for a couple of hours to see how blood circulation is affected (too tight).
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FollowupID: 879874

Follow Up By: ian.g - Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 17:05

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 17:05
Alternatively you can now get a specific Snake Bite Compression Bandage, they have a rectangle printed every six inches or so and when they are fitted at the correct tension the rectangle turns to a square, makes it very easy to get the correct tension. Well worth buying, think they are about $17 or there about.
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FollowupID: 879879

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 17:19

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 17:19
Great idea Ian, will have a look around for them myself.
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FollowupID: 879882

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 17:35

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 17:35
Thanks Ian, Just ordered some.
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FollowupID: 879883

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 17:40

Thursday, Apr 06, 2017 at 17:40
Found here . . .
http://www.sssafe.com.au/first-aid-kits/snake-smart-bandage
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FollowupID: 879884

Follow Up By: ian.g - Friday, Apr 07, 2017 at 09:26

Friday, Apr 07, 2017 at 09:26
Yes Les they are the ones I was talking about
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FollowupID: 879894

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Friday, Apr 07, 2017 at 09:30

Friday, Apr 07, 2017 at 09:30
Cheers Ian, I had a google and found numerous sources, some were $19 a bandage, so this supplier at $13.50 was a reasonable option.
I think I'll get 6 and put 3 in each main vehicle first aid kit (the remote kit), and a few in my snake catching / bushwalking kit.
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FollowupID: 879897

Follow Up By: ian.g - Friday, Apr 07, 2017 at 09:33

Friday, Apr 07, 2017 at 09:33
Sounds Good Les. Price was cheaper than I had seen also, good pick up.
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FollowupID: 879898

Follow Up By: Banjo (WA) - Saturday, Apr 08, 2017 at 13:15

Saturday, Apr 08, 2017 at 13:15
Wouldn't you need to have a 'standard' size arm or leg for this to be effective.

I've seen legs like broomsticks and others like, well, I'll just say large.
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FollowupID: 879946

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Saturday, Apr 08, 2017 at 13:24

Saturday, Apr 08, 2017 at 13:24
Nah, the tension would be the same regardless of limb size.
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FollowupID: 879947

Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Saturday, Apr 08, 2017 at 14:24

Saturday, Apr 08, 2017 at 14:24
Check out RescueSwag. It was featured on the TV Show Shark Tank. It is an excellent first aid kit. There is also a Rescue Swag app that you can download to phone or tablet with first aid instructions, that works wether you have signal or not.

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AnswerID: 610034

Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Apr 09, 2017 at 12:25

Sunday, Apr 09, 2017 at 12:25
Friends when it comes to buying first aid supplies ..... find yourself a good specialist first aid company that is not charging silly prices.

Start buying first aid suppliers from places like chemists and other retail suppliers and you will be paying well over the odds.

To start with you want to be buying bulk packed items not retail packed ..... oh that makes a big difference.
A roll of micropore for 30C rather than $3.50 serioulsy.

and you will have access to stuff you may find hard to get.

They will have good quality compression bandages ..... they will also have things like burnaid, betadine cream and other things in single use sachets ...... which are much better in kit.

I also carry different types of surgical dressings, that either wont be available elsewhere are they will be at rediculous prices.

these are particularly handy when closing or dressing minor to moderate wounds when you are several hours or days from the nearest town.

But those 3 x 4 inch compression bandages ...... they can save lives and plenty more two.

cheers
AnswerID: 610071

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