Windscreen crack

Submitted: Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 12:54
ThreadID: 134641 Views:2835 Replies:5 FollowUps:21
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What to do if anything?

A crack developed on the passenger side, running maybe 6" up from the bottom. Then another a couple of inches away and maybe 2" long.
They haven't progressed.

Neither affects vision.

I'm inclined to leave it as the likelihood of a killer stone outback is pretty high.

What does the brains trust reckon?
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Reply By: uncle arthur - Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 13:06

Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 13:06
I copped a rock on my last trip giving me a bullet star chip in roughly the same location. Had seen a windscreen repair kit at Repco and tried it following the directions for that repair. Has different instructions for different types of repairs including cracks.. End result there is only a slight mark on the screen and no evidence of the bullet star. The kit comes complete with drone looking applicator and VERY thin superglue that does the repair and even a razor blade to clean up the finished job. The kit has enough material to do up to 5 repairs. Cost of kit about $35. Well worth the investment. Windscreen 18 months on still still in good visibility and would pass rego inspection.
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 14:28

Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 14:28
ThanksArthur.

I have one of those kits but it's not that kind of flaw.
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Reply By: Malcom M - Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 13:48

Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 13:48
Super glue works well.
Think you'll find that cracks are a defect item. Chips under the size of a 20c coin are ok provided they are not in the line of vision but long cracks are another thing.
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 14:30

Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 14:30
Yeah. The thin stuff should wick in the crack OK.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 08:38

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 08:38
Here's and idea. Fix it! It's dangerous and a defect to boot. Yes. That was a facitious comment.

One simple bump, shake, rattle or even a pebble and it could end up on your grandchild's lap. Maybe even cover the whole front seat and you. Even at a safe speed, I hope that you're wearing protective glasses. You'd be lucky to still see again if it shattered all over you. All just for a few bucks.

Would you replace a tyre with a cut in the side wall, even if it isn't leaking!

Glass is very unpredictable.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:11

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:11
My understanding is that the modern ones don't crumble Phil. They're laminated.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:17

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:17
Very helpful Phil

1/ Modern screens are laminated, they don't fall into a pile of rubble.

2/ Bloody hard to fix if you are in the middle of nowhere but a tube of glue or the proper repair kit should get you out of trouble for a while, at least to get back to civilisation.

As the vehicle will be defected at its next rego, obviously it would be repaired.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:36

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:36
Malcome: Nothing was said about the op being in a remote area so why bring that up.

Sigmund: I know they are laminated but why not fix it. It only takes one small splinter or "bit" of glass to ruin an eye. We have always fixed ours, asap, even when just a crack appears. Just as I replace tyres with cuts in them. Replaced my 2nd spare last week. It had a cut and wasn't deflated.

Phil
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:40

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:40
The crack is in the outer layer of glass - no chance of any splinters inside of the car as the inner layer and the plastic layer are not damaged.

A bit of an over dramatization I think.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 10:14

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 10:14
Garrycol

Firstly how do you know for sure that it's only cracked in the outer layer. That's making a big assumption from what the op said.

Even so, are you 100% positive that there is absolutely nothing dangerous with a cracked windscreen. If so why then do they wear safety glasses, clothes and gloves when changing them.

If want to play journo then here's a bit of drama for you;

I just remember breaking a windscreen, okay it was decades ago and in a Chrysler Royal to boot. It broke on the Hume just south of Yass, at 2AM in the middle of winter. And then and having to continue to Sydney. Freezing all the way. It was bloody cold. Two of us rotated driving, with the non-driver lying on the floor in the back where it was warmed up a bit from the exhaust. Freeeeeezing. Don't want that again no matter what the laws or "others" say.

It's a free choice. I answer as I see it. If you don't care, then that's your problem. If something is broken on our car we fix it. The car is maintained to "get us home" not just get there. This also includes making sure that it is safe and legal. I care about those things apparently others put money first.

No argument - just our way.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 11:04

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 11:04
" lying on the floor in the back "

Kinda blows away your safety conscious arguments...
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 11:06

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 11:06
Your example is not at all relevant to a modern laminated windscreen.
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Follow Up By: Jarse - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 12:29

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 12:29
Absolutely correct about laminated windscreens. It's quite easy to tell if the inside layer is cracked. That doesn't usually happen unless the outside layer is struck with sufficient force to transfer some of it through the interlayer. That usually means the outer layer is severely damaged.
But I digress. Cracks can also occur due to twisting of the vehicle body, typically over extreme bumps. Gluing any crack won't necessarily be a permanent repair unless you stop-drill the crack at its end. It's also important to seal the drill hole and crack with an appropriate glue, for two reasons: 1: To meet the optical requirements for windscreen repair, and 2: To keep dust and moisture out. Dust acts like a lever and helps spread the crack, and moisture can cause the interlayer to discolour and go milky. That will also contribute to delamination down the track.
Hope this FACTUAL information is of some assistance.

P.S. Sigmund, if it's only cracked, I would get it repaired, as above, to avoid the potenial long-term deterioration described above.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 13:12

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 13:12
The doom & bloomers predicting that a small child will be decapitated (or worse), need to be reminded that there is a layer of PVB (plastic) sandwiched between the inner & outer layers of glass.

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 14:29

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 14:29
Ah dear me!!! Not worth responding. Getting childish now.
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Follow Up By: GREG T11 - Thursday, Apr 13, 2017 at 20:26

Thursday, Apr 13, 2017 at 20:26
Phil, you are being a tad paranoid about it. Laminated screens DO not go bang like the old safety glass of the past.

It is perfectly legal to have it repaired, in fact there is a whole industry that caters for it. Windscreens O'Brien are one that offers both options and I would think that if they could flog you a new screen rather than a repair which way do you think they would go.

On the other side of the coin if I had the bad luck of having 4 broken in 4 years I wouldn't be bitching to much about any particular insurance company. I think you would find all would draw he line at some point.

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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 17:10

Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 17:10
If you can get a free windscreen on insurance then its a nobrainer.
If not then I'm with you - leave it alone and wait for the next rock.
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 17:32

Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017 at 17:32
There's an idea. Will pull out the papers and get the magnifying glass.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:23

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:23
Ahh yes the 'free' windscreen on insurance ,,,, now our insurance was 'unlimited' glass and screen replacement at $50 'excess' , NOT just the 1 screen per year , needed a new windscreen with the odo only having 30km on the clock , no worries , now am on the 4th windscreen and the vehicle has just had its 4th b/day , Insurance co REFUSES to re-insure vehicle unless 'glass' is removed from policy and we "lose" our 60% no claim bonus ….. when asked reason , " parts for your vehicle ,including glass, is getting harder and expensive to source "…….no other claims EVER , 4year old Toyota…..

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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:34

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:34
Ah yes, insurance companies never lose.
It always pays to assess whether it is worthwhile making a claim, taking into account premium increases are likely (even if you change insurers, they ask about recent claims), loss of no claim bonuses (which usually cost extra each year in premiums), and just the often PITA factor in dealing with them.
Speaking from a crash shop history POV.

Just wait for premiums Aust wide from the cyclone Debbie, and flood aftermath !!
Premiums will be put up Aust wide, to 'spread the pain' to the people directly affected.
After they sift through and deny claims citing water rising, falling, not caused by cyclone, etc etc, those claims that get told they were underinsured 50%, all that sort of thing, they will not lose all that much after the inevitable widespread premium rises.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:35

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 09:35
Sounds like its time to change insurance companies.
Our vehicles are with RAA and have unlimited windscreen replacements with no excess. And I'm paying $500 a year to insure the Landcruiser and $230 a year for the Tvan. But I have only ever claimed once for a windscreen.
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Reply By: Sigmund - Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 13:15

Wednesday, Apr 12, 2017 at 13:15
The windscreen already had a couple of star fractures courtesy of outback hoons.

We don't have annual inspections for rereg.

I think this one started with a small ping that happened on the Hume. The next day I turned on the heating and later noticed the cracks. That's happened to me before. I'm thinking that there were stresses already in the screen, and yes, as it's a structural member more rough driving may extend the cracks. So I'll hit them some CA.
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Reply By: Sigmund - Monday, Apr 24, 2017 at 07:20

Monday, Apr 24, 2017 at 07:20
Update:

I tried standard CA and it wouldn't wick in. May try the cheap thin bargain shop stuff.

A third crack has also started from that small chip down the bottom, meaning I'm not now all that comfortable leaving it as is.
AnswerID: 610486

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Monday, Apr 24, 2017 at 09:02

Monday, Apr 24, 2017 at 09:02
Just replace Sig, and go for a moderate price.
Some of the cheaper lam screens can be quite distorted or have defects, as I found once with a Getz screen replacement.
You probably have plenty of sandblast damage on that screen anyway form all your travels, most noticible driving into the sun or car headlights . . . when you fit a new one it will be like cleaning your glasses after doing a vehilce self service !! :)
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Monday, Apr 24, 2017 at 09:17

Monday, Apr 24, 2017 at 09:17
Yeah, Les.

Whatever it is that grows on regularly damp glass has done a deal of etching too.

This winter's going to involve a good deal of night driving so I'm looking at a Stedi
LED bar as well. How are yours travelling?
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Monday, Apr 24, 2017 at 09:32

Monday, Apr 24, 2017 at 09:32
The stedis are going great, must take some pics one night, as the larger one can literally light up a hillside !!

I fitted this one first, with the aim to get more in close side lighting . . .
Stedi 17" 80w

ALthough it has 2 floods each side of the 4 centre spot reflectors, it still didn't help much, but out front works great for in close, while the HIDs work long range.

So I fitted the curved one for the roof bar . . .
Stedi 42" 240w curved

Works great up there, just have back far enough so it doesn't shine down the (new :)) windscreen, and paint all accessories up front matt black.

I am actually in the process of painting my entire bonnet and tops of guards with matt clearcoat, not so much 100% needed, but will stop glare from street lights and oncoming traffic too.
Plus I like the matt, may end up doing a couple of panels at a time and do the whole vehicle !!
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