Jerry Can Options

Submitted: Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 19:46
ThreadID: 134824 Views:4064 Replies:12 FollowUps:7
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Heading up to Alice via the Oodnadatta Track in a few months & I wish to carry 20 litres of diesel. I have a Pajero & the fuel filler is quite high so I'd prefer to not have to hold a 20 litre jerry can at chest height (yes I'm short) & try & tip diesel into the tank, so I'm looking at a pair of 10 litre containers. It appears that these are only available in plastic, are there any issues with using plastic jerry cans (I've always used steel)?
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Reply By: RMD - Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 20:06

Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 20:06
I carry a 5 litre emergency container, red plastic/polyurethane.
I also have a 50 litre RED polyurethane tank in the tub of my dual cab. No problem with plastic diesel containers.
AnswerID: 610973

Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 20:16

Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 20:16
If you can get onto some 10L Rheem jerrycans, Chris, they are the go. Any colour you like, as long as it's black, but they are indestructible.

Bob

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AnswerID: 610974

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 00:59

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 00:59
Backup Bob on this one - bought some black 10L jerry cans 10 years ago - still as good as new.
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FollowupID: 880960

Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 08:51

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 08:51
Yep.
I have been using Rheem plastic jerries for over 20 years (including 10L ones) and never had a failure.
If you gave me some metal ones I would not use them.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
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FollowupID: 880965

Reply By: Top End Az - Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 20:44

Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 20:44
I have taken a couple of yellow plastic Supercheap jerrycans around Oz and been on the usual rough tracks etc. No problems with them leaking or splitting. And you don't have to worry about flaking rust or paint contaminating the fuel. To keep costs down you can always use a fuel siphon hose to transfer the fuel instead of pouring it in.
AnswerID: 610975

Reply By: Tim Owen - Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 20:52

Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 20:52
What about some flexible 10L fuel containers? A bit more expensive, but save a lot of space when not needed. I ordered 10 directly from china a while back ... more than I need but it was a case of 'buy in bulk and save'. I'll get organised and offload some one day. Google '10 Litre Touring Bladder' to see what I mean.
AnswerID: 610976

Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 22:07

Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 22:07
I always used steel cans until recently. The newer ones are garbage and corrode internally so now I use quality plastic Jerry's and change them as soon as they start showing wear.
AnswerID: 610983

Reply By: garrycol - Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 22:29

Tuesday, May 09, 2017 at 22:29
I guess you have not looked hard for metal ones - try Bunnings - that is a link to the ones they sell.

Having said that there is nothing wrong with the plastic ones but the one I have has cracked its lid.
AnswerID: 610984

Follow Up By: Chris. - Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 05:16

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 05:16
Not hard enough, thanks mate.
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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 06:49

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 06:49
Proquip do 10L metal Jerry cans. I always use Proquip, though I prefer the plastic ones.
10l steel jerry cans

Also you can use a tanamai pump like this which uses compressed air. I have one of these.

Lastly there are battery transfer pumps on ebay etc.
AnswerID: 610986

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 08:28

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 08:28
Have been using a Tanami Pump for years.
Only needs around 4psi to pressurize jerry so that fuel flows. In fact any more and the safety valve will operate.
A bike pump will be sufficient, or if you have a rear mounted spare, you can use that, in conjunction with a length of hose fitted with clamp style fittings each end and an air valve tap to control flow of air.
I have a length of fuel grade hose to reach the filler with the jerries still mounted in their racks on the "A" frame.

Excellent piece of kit.
Bill


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Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 13:16

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 13:16
Put it on a camp table and use a siphon hose?

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
AnswerID: 610998

Reply By: Member - Robert1660 - Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 14:08

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 14:08
Hi Chris
Suggest that you obtain a filter funnel as well. I use a "Mr Funnel" which will not only filter particulate matter but also water from any fuel. You may suspect that being able to filter out any water would make the flow rate very low, however this is not the case. You can also use the filter when filling from a bowser at a fuel stop. Recommended.
Robert
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Follow Up By: Chris. - Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 14:11

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 14:11
okay cheers for the feedback Robert!!
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Reply By: TruBluGeeQ - Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 04:34

Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 04:34
Like Boo, I use the ProQuip 10L Metal Jerry Cans. Can't go wrong. They are military grade and won't rust. Ivan has likely gone to Bunnings (like someone suggested) and got the Chinese rubbish they are now peddling. Absolutely terrible cans, that rust within weeks and and have all sorts of internal issues. I see now Bunnings are selling Chinese plastic cans too!! They should be ashamed pushing this trash on to their customers!
AnswerID: 611024

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 09:50

Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 09:50
Couldn't agree more!

We used to have WA Salvage in the West. A cheap (read very cheap - the cheapest of the imported crud) hardware/variety store. Guess who took them over - Bunnings. The crud just changed locations.

What's worse - they advertise "Experts" and "Qualified Trades People" as their sales staff. Not quite what you get. If I need technical advice on a product or project - forget it.

Cheers

Anthony
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Follow Up By: Dean K3 - Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 20:11

Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 20:11
Another person who hate bunnings for exactly same reasons I do !

and yes as a west aussie know exactly what ACD 1 is referring to
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FollowupID: 881026

Reply By: Deejay - Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 18:59

Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 18:59
Chris. When I drove the Canning I determined I'd need to carry 100 extra litres of diesel requiring the purchase of five 20 litre drums that I would probably never use again. A total of about $200. By luck I had kept every plastic 20 litre engine oil drum I had bought oil in over the years. I figured if the plastic could withstand engine oil it could withstand diesel fuel. Besides, that's all we ever used when I was a maintenance fitter. Now some people will howl me down for this but I've never had any trouble using these containers. I had to carry 3 of the 'drums' inside the car so made a light gauge, sheet metal, liquid proof box made that would hold the drums snuggly and hold any diesel should a leak occur. The other 2 drums went on the roof rack. You could do this same thing with 10 litre containers. It's also probably a good idea to invest in one the aforementioned filter funnels.
AnswerID: 611045

Reply By: Dean K3 - Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 20:08

Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 20:08
Not that this is endorsed by any means by authorities.

check your cross country load rating first !

have seen a bloke use couple of outboard engine fuel tanks (40-45 l capacity) mounted them to roof rack on 150prado he then had a length of fuel hose (black low pressure be ok ) couple of dry break fittings fitted to fuel line, get them from BCF or similar tanks will have one fitted as well.

fabricated a fuel cap that he could screw on fuel filler with short length of hose dangling into filler neck about 3 inches long

he then simply sucked abit on hose get airlock out and let gravity run fuel into tanks via modified fuel cap - he mentioned he even drove with it like this to save time when on road.

Not a flinch from blue shirts either

AnswerID: 611049

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