1080 Bait In Remote South Oz

Submitted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 at 19:24
ThreadID: 134867 Views:3141 Replies:7 FollowUps:8
This Thread has been Archived
Hi everyone, I'm travelling up from Adelaide to the red centre later this year & my blue heeler is coming along for the ride. We will drive the Oodnadatta Track in one direction, probably on the way up there, camping in powered sites at camp grounds along the way.

I have been trying to find out info on where 1080 is used between Adelaide & Alice Springs, in particular along the track, but accurate info seems scarce. He will rarely be walked off a lead & I have also considered putting a muzzle on him but would prefer not to if it isn't necessary (he hasn't worn one before). Has anyone taken their dog this way before or does anyone know of any issues or more information?
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Murray R (VIC) - Sunday, May 14, 2017 at 21:32

Sunday, May 14, 2017 at 21:32
Chris
Anywhere that you stop along the Oodnadatta and baits are present it should be well sign posted. If you have any doubts walk your dog on the lead, a muzzle won't be required. The baits are also burried under gound and have some sort of visual identification near by so that rangers or who ever can see if a bait has been taken to keep tab on results. The visual identification can be a peice of survey tape or fluro paint on tree or bush near by. If you stop at all the usual places on the track and baits are there as i said it will be well signed.

Murray
Another Mexican

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 611107

Follow Up By: Chris. - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 06:47

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 06:47
Thanks Murray, much appreciated!
0
FollowupID: 881121

Follow Up By: terryt - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 07:13

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 07:13
Sometimes you may see a sign warning of baits but if you look at it they may have been last placed many months ago.
1
FollowupID: 881122

Follow Up By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 08:37

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 08:37
Be careful Chris I have personally seen baits laid on private land near one of those tracks with out signs and also there is the possibility of crows shifting them.
The wind will not always blow your way, adjust your sails.
VKS737 1219

Member
My Profile  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 881123

Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 08:44

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 08:44
When our dogs are not within eye sight they are in dog crates. Valuable working dogs.
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
VKS 737 mobile 0049 selcall 0049

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 611110

Reply By: Gramps - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 10:09

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 10:09
I'd keep him on a leash with a muzzle. DON'T rely on signs being posted. Baits are moved by animals, birds etc.

Regards
AnswerID: 611111

Follow Up By: Kazza055 - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 14:52

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 14:52
Yup, do what we do and keep them on a leash, that way they don't annoy other people and you can always see what they are up to.
2
FollowupID: 881131

Reply By: Been-Everywhereman - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 14:32

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 14:32
Our dog has made many trips through similar and worse 1080 areas. We check our camping area thoroughly and then his lead will be attached and his run is only as long as the checked area. One eye never leaves him and only walk him on roads and along roads. Common sense.
AnswerID: 611114

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 20:19

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 20:19
Hi Chris

Best bet is to play it very safe and take no chances. Most station people that I know do not mark where the bait is laid, for the simple reason is it is either dropped from the air, or either thrown out of utes while driving.

Wild dogs and dingo will roam anywhere and not just restricted to the roadside. Depending on what bait is used, it will lead to a very slow and cruel death to your dog.

One lot of station people that I know up near Broken Hill had one of their own working dogs pick up a bait and as quick as it was, the poor dog took many hours to die in utter pain, and by the time they found him it was over. They picked up their mate to bury him at home and put it in the back of the ute, where there was another station dog.

The other poor dog started licking the dead dog to try and bring it round, thinking it was sleeping. Within hours that dog started to show symptoms of the poisoning and they took no chances, and hopped into their plane and took a mercy flight to Broken Hill and and rushed to the local vet.

He spent nearly a week in the vets and was one very lucky dog. Another lot of station people that I know and are just over the boarder in the Northern Territory do not bait within 40 kilometres of the homestead to keep their dogs as safe as possible.

Take no chances and keep him safe.



Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 611127

Follow Up By: Chris. - Monday, May 15, 2017 at 20:23

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 20:23
Cheers Stephen, I'll keep him either on a lead, in my tent or tethered to my Pajero when we're camped for the night.
1
FollowupID: 881142

Follow Up By: Kilcowera Station Stay - Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 06:32

Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 06:32
Very well said Stephen. You simply cannot be too careful when it comes to 1080. Cheers zenonie
Kilcowera Station Stay

Business Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 881150

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 07:41

Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 07:41
As you're going up there later in the year, I'd suggest you start training your dog now, to accept a muzzle. They can still get a bait while they're on a lead, even if you think you have the situation under control.

The required warning signs aren't always noticeable as you cross grids on the road, and may well not even be posted, though it is a requirement. As others noted, baits can be moved by birds, well out of the bait area.

The ideal situation for your dog would be to leave him at home with friends or family, or perhaps in kennels? It is very, very distressing to watch a pet die, that has taken a 1080 bait.

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 881151

Reply By: Cheryl & Ian (NSW) - Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 19:30

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 19:30
Hi Chris,

We will also bee travelling in the SA outback with our three dogs in the next couple of months. 1080 baits are such a worry to us pet owners. As well as the good advice already given I would suggest you buy some washing soda crystals. These are great to get your dog to vomit. If you see your dog ingest something then you can adminster a large crystal (about the size of your little finger nail) in the same way you would administer an oral tablet. Wait a couple of minutes and if your dog doesn't vomit, administer another one.

These crystals are very effective in getting your dog to vomit. Having vomitted up the bait, you still need veterinary attention as some may have been absorbed, but at least the emergency is lessened some what.

Cheryl

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 611166

Follow Up By: Chris. - Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 19:37

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 19:37
you're a champion, thanks so much Cheryl. Have a great trip!!
0
FollowupID: 881187

Reply By: 9900Eagle - Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 20:59

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 20:59
Chris, most places do post baits are being used. Don't let the dog off the lead if you are concerned. We had a beautiful working dog that was so quick she could gobble up a bait and you wouldn't even notice.

Walk them on a lead is the only guarantee, if you are not from that part of the country.
AnswerID: 611172

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)