Do You Think the Kimberley is over rated ?

Submitted: Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 12:02
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Just back from major trip and I certainly I got the feeling that its a sausage factory for campers.
At the start we had 6 vehicles , one upgraded to a full caravan and ruled themselves out, one got a job offer to good to turn down a couple of days into our trip and another wrote off there brand new crossover and cruiser
just before hooking up with us in W.A.

This left us with a manageable 3 cars & campers for our 8 week 15000km trip.
But we still found this a lot more limiting than our usual "Sleep in the car and tow nothing" travel method.

Our notes told us that recently the last offical Kimberley free camp was closed and the method of travel being promoted was to drive on a badly corrugated road to the next national park or station and camp in a poor quality overated and crowded camp area.
Most but not all of the places had little to do or maybe a walk to a gorge , have a swim then get hot andbot hered again before walking back to the distant car park !


Cape Leveque was meant to be good from our pre-trip research but we struggled to find a single decent 4wd track almost everything was "NO ACCESS" - or very limited and campsites were heavily overcrowded.

True it was busy , but not the peak season.


There was some limited access if you were booked into "xyz" resort, but the whole idea of a remote challenging
place to check out seems to have been lost.

We visited all the main places and my favourite gorge was Bell gorge and while its a classic loverly waterfall into a swim pool and was great , the hot walking/driving/climbing from a distant carpark made it hardly worth the effort.

One over crowded place was El Questro and it actually had a couple of short but real 4wd hill climbs but the overall atmosphere of "No Go" signs and queueing was such that of the 4 days there we choose to leave on 3 days and drive the 200km return trip to Wydham , which we thought was a much more interesting area.

Some places, like Home Valley , had an entrance drive which went right past the campsites and was just bulldust and thick clouds of dust hung in the air after each car passed.

I have no doubt that a single car with local knowledge could have found a way to make it work but when your planning for a few with all there seperate wishes, and the general lack of flexibility, its a lot harder than the places we usual frequent in Victoria.

Indeed for the trip up from Melbourne to Broome I sucessfully planned 10 free camps in a row with no issues yet on the Gibb river road we managed only 1 genuine , "away from it all" free camp.
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 12:39

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 12:39
The Kimberley is one of Australia's most remote and inhospitable regions. It is not an area that has been developed with tourists in mind.

There is more to the Kimberley than the main thoroughfare but you won't find it easily accessible on the internet for a good reason. To access the very special places off the Gibb River Road, tour companies have worked for generations to build trust with the local people (both cattle stations and indigenous peoples) to ensure that the area is not decimated by the impact of tourism they bring. Self-drive tourism is mostly limited to the GRR, Mitchell Falls, Kalumburu, Windjana Gorge/Tunnel Creek and yes due to seasonal access logistics, there is a peak period of tourism traffic June - Sept.

We've always said that to truly explore it you need to either get up in the air, or get in a boat, or at the very least get access through station property (eg. Mt Elizabeth) to get access to the coastline. This requires a lot more effort in planning and a lot more cost but that is how you need to see the real Kimberley.

It's a matter of expectations being driven by commercial/aerial photography to sell the region, and the reality of opportunities for self-drive road-based tourism via the GRR.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 14:38

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 14:38
I guess a lot depends on what ones interests and expectations are Michelle.

Based on our research mine were that it was remote with some real 4wding and cute places were less important to us than the possible driving experience.

But it just wasn't and access to the pretty places was more difficult than need be.

Indeed as we continued on to Darwin we tuned into an ABC radio talk decrying the lack of tourism caused by poor infrastructure and how to fix it.

There seemed to be competing commercial interests at work which I thought was well demonstrated at Mitchell falls.

I'm told that once access was easier but now those (and we saw several) older or who could not walk far were stopped by the need to scramble over rocks 100m from the car park. However 100m away in the other direction were several helicopters eager for passengers.






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Reply By: duck - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 13:35

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 13:35
Robin
by road, it’s not what it used to be, but where is!, in recent years I have had it with just a few vehicles & hardly saw anyone to it being packed by 4wd/buses/caravans/trucks etc. etc., but I know what you mean by "No Access" but again there are so many places that we can't go now that we use too
But I must say to do it by boat & helicopter & foot it’s the only true way to see it & no crowds but is expensive or hard to organise, I've been lucky enough to do it by boat 4 times, from a little 17' tinnie with a 70hp with a documentary film maker in the late 70's & 80's to organising my own trip (24' trailer boat) & last year in style on a 35mtr luxury power catamaran from Brome to Darwin & I must say only a few things have changed it that time & the coast art work is so plentiful & all the islands/reefs/waterfalls/swimming holes/Fishing/bird watching etc. are so much better. But if your into remote Australia there is nothing like it
I'm not into cattle truck tourism & like to do my own thing but I must say the trip last year was in my top 3 along side my trips to Antarctica & Pitcairn Island
Put it on your bucket list, The Kimberly's by sea you will not forget it or regret it
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Follow Up By: Member - Ross N (NSW) - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:50

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:50
I read the other day that there is a proposal to charge AUD 150 per person to travel the Kimberley by boat/ship.
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Reply By: Sigmund - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 14:11

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 14:11
Little to do apart from swim and get hot?! One of the richest and most diverse ecosystems in the world. Did you go out to the Broome Bird Observatory? No, nothing to learn there.

Free camps not far north of Broome on the Cape. Maybe they don't meet your criteria for "genuine" whatever that is.

Camp down by the river at Home Valley to avoid the dust. Didn't you look? Spectacular sunsets and croc spotting.

Mitchell Plateau and Falls. Also spectacular. But oh dear, you have to walk or pay for a chopper.

King Edward River campsite. Cheap. Beautiful. The short stroll to the water needn't have got your sweat up.

Kalumburu Rd. An excellent trial of 4WD-worthiness.

Mt Elizabeth station to the falls/swimming hole - some nice slow 4WDing.
More 4WD - Munja Tk if you want hard core. Or else the track north from Pentecost R?

Added: Mornington Station. Hire a gorge for a day! See what the largest private land manager in the country is doing to manage wildfires, control cats and protect threatened mammals and birds.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:28

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:28
Hi Sigmund

Some of those points you make reflect your interests not mine.

For example I wouldn't drive around the corner to see the bird observatory unless it was at the end of 10km of 4wd track where apon I would play with my tyre pressures when I got there while my passengers did the bird thing.

So it is about expectations - and I do a lot of research and just about every station on the Gibb river road advertizes 4wd tracks etc only when you get there its just corrugated dirt road with little 4wding if any.



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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:28

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:28
It seems you did your research poorly.

It's not just my interests that differ from yours.

BTW there's a choice of two dirt tracks to get to the BBO.
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Follow Up By: Member - Blue M - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 23:32

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 23:32
Robin, I guess the advertising of 4wd tracks would be correct to most city slickers.
Apparently, off road to the masses means as soon as you leave the bitumen, and Outback is 100 clicks from the coast.
I did the Gibb road back in 2012 and found it very interesting, but not extremely challenging, with the exception from the Mitchell Falls turn off to Honey Moon Beach. We got in front of the grader.
If I were to drive around the Vic High Country, I would feel as disappointed as you did in the Kimberly.
I could think of nothing worse than letting down my tyres, driving 10k up some rock infested hill, turn around go back down and pump them back up again.
Wow what fun.
As far as free camps along the road, well that is up for discussion also, for me a free camp is clearing off to the side of the road somewhere, preferably in a gravel pit.
I have friends from the city in the south and free camping to them is some where that is cheaper than a caravan park, but must have all the amenities.

But then again, I suppose we all have different ex[ectations when it comes to enjoying ones self.

Cheers
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Reply By: Dean K3 - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 14:48

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 14:48
Sounds like you were born 50-100 years too late fpor what you were expecting to encounter.

First visit to kimberly was 1978 as a young tacker last visit was 2014 - enjoyed myself a few things went pear shape so had to reevaluate my plans and worked around it.

Still means that one day I shall return and have a look at places I missed or wish to re-visit again.

Each to their own and honestly if you don't like it keep to east coast as it bit of a hike to find it doesn't come up to your expectations
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:40

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:40
Hi Dean

Yes my next door neighbour lived there (Cape Leveque) for a couple of years around 1980 and told me how good it was and how I would love it.

But when we got there to a bush camp up the top , we had to camp 3m from the next car on a sloping bit of land denuded of all firewood.
I suspect those who go fishing would have liked it more, nevertheless we were able to go swimming in the ocean which I did not expect.

Also the girls loved it as they got expensive pearls.

Actually I like the big hike and driving the Tanimi was fun, you just have to time things so that you don't spend to much time at the destinations
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Reply By: Member - Tony H (touring oz) - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 14:50

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 14:50
Hi Robin,
For many years now I have read your regular contributions on this site, you sound/come across as a positive informed traveller with many years of knowledge behind you. I have on a couple of occasions followed your comments or suggestions which I would like to thank you for.
Saying that, I find it 'strange' that for a guy with what I consider so much knowledge and enthusiasm could plan such a trip (& a very long and expensive trip) without doing more pre trip planning. Then write such a negative 'report' about the Kimberley.......you have only 'seen' such a small part of the true majesty the area has to offer.
It is sad (for you) that you travelled so far..... to come home and be underwhelmed in your trip. Hopefully one day you will return to the Kimberley and have a better look around.
Cheers and beers
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:17

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:17
Hi Tony thanks for your both pro and con comments.

Actually I loved the trip even though underwhelmed by the Kimberley part.

I finally drove whats left of cable beach , fluked a ride in a V8 supercar at hidden valley , drove the tanimi in really good time, we managed to drown a car in Litchfield --- and the fun continued all the way.

But talk about pressure , try this little story , I'm driving along a dirt road near Cobar where there is 1 roadkill per 50m , next I hear a car noise - stopped to look and my camper trailer cable had been ripped out of its plug and bare wires were just left dangling.

So ,ok I say , I will drive on to Cobar to fix with a mate covering my backside so no one would be upset by me having lost all my trailer lights.

So 10 minutes later my mate radios " Robin , theres a cop car coming up fast get off the road".

Well I assume this is 1 of many practical jokes that were played out on the trip !

Next minute , as I enter a twisty slow dirt road section I see this cop car right on my tail.

Damm , what to do, If I touch the brakes and pull over to let him past he will see I have no lights.

For the next 3km , sweating like hell I drove such that it would appear I'm just a slow tourist who can't see out the mud soaked (and shattered - thats another story) rear window . At each of the many bends I changed the auto down , careful not to touch brakes , and accelerated slowly , and finally the cop car gave up and roared past me in a cloud of dust no doubt getting his frustration out.

I then hot wired the trailer on the side of the road and didn't disconnect it for 3 days till I got home.


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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 16:14

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 16:14
,
Hi Robin, if you so much like the "10km of 4WD track, playing with tyre pressures" 'and all that jazz', then why on earth go all the way to The Kimberley? You could get all that at Landcruiser Mountain Park Jimna and even got a nice free camp.

Anyway, I can now be certain that there will be one less vehicle in my way on our next Kimberley visit. LOL
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 17:12

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 17:12
You know what its like Allan - I'm running out of boxes to tick and this is another one down !
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Follow Up By: RMD - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 17:19

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 17:19
Robin. Why is it important to drive the Tanami in really good time? Isn't the idea to enjoy the outback and the surrounds? Not sure that is achieved at max speed over the distance. Rocket booster assist may make it quicker if that is your thing.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:15

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:15
Hi RMD
Driving in really good time shouldn't be translated into driving at high speed in fact if you asked my travelling mates they would tell you that i drive to slowly but travel fast..

Its more about travelling efficently not holding others up , maximizing fuel stops and range such that you cover more tracks , not making navigation errors and planning stops. Walking into a coffee shop knowing what you want and not day dreaming.

Some people are hopless at travelling and start late and speed to catch up which makes them a danger to other drivers.

Not my style !
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Follow Up By: George_M - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:31

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:31
(LOL)

Apart from the electrics, how did the lite-weight trailer go, Robin?

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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:49

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:49
Seriously good George , probably right it up , but briefly its weight of 500kg loaded meant we did the entire 15000 running 9 psi in the tyres and its flexibility meant it could be pushed into places others couldn't go.

However it did not rain once in 8 weeks so it was not tested in the wet which would have added to our pack up time.

However I still hate towing - every time we drove past something that looked like a track to tight to drive a dark cloud came out and covered the sun !
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:22

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:22
Alan B,

You seem to be having trouble with your arithmatic.

The next time you travel to the Kimberly there might be 6 car loads of "remote" seekers less....LOL

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 20:51

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 20:51
.
No Pop, I think my arithmetics are valid. Robin's group was reduced to three vehicles and we have heard only from one....... Robin himself. The other two may have loved the Kimberley.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 09:56

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 09:56
Allan B

You may be right but I guess if the trip leader/organizer is sooooo disappointed we can only hope it rubs off on the rest of party. i.e. the ones who made the trip so maybe 3 less.

Cheers
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Reply By: Top End Az - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:38

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 15:38
The issue stems from a few people doing the wrong thing, so places gradually get locked up; forcing more and more folks into fewer places which really turns you off the whole experience. Littering, toilet paper, tearing up tracks and cuting down trees for firewood are common problems. Same with a lot of National Parks. Most want to get away from it all, but once there, you're camping with every other bloke trying to do the same.
I believe that opening more places up for camping should theoretically take pressure off existing places, but of course it all costs money to run and manage camp sites, install toilets etc etc
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:41

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:41
It really shouldn't cost more Top End and re-opening all the closed places would solve many issues I feel.

The system has an inbuilt compulsion to want to control things and achieves this by increasing standards which then have to be meet with increasing cost.

We had great example of this at Talbotville one of our favourite places, briefly it had 2 toilets but new guidelines meant more cost and instead of upgrading both the budget was meet by closing down one and upgrading the other.

The one toilet meets the new standard but its so under capacity that a lot just go into the bush.

So now the system can blame the users for an issue they never had !
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 17:45

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 17:45
If you are used to tough tracks in the Vic High Country then almost everywhere else will seem pretty tame 4wd wise. That's my opinion any way. I have friends who did the Kimberly in Holden panel vans 40 years ago. Local indigenous people do most of the Outback in Falcons. That says it all to me.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:02

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:02
Yeah ,know what you mean Michael - we were feeling homesick until we left the Gibb in dust and promptly drowned the Navara in the group at a river crossing in Litchfield.

Then it was panic , snatch straps , diff locks - felt really good , but then I didn't have to remove 30cm of water from inside that car.

One thing good about up north is that when wading in the river at least its not cold like down here!

Mind you there other things in the water at times.





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Reply By: Member - Paul B (WA) - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:54

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 18:54
I reckon the Kimberley bush is hugely overrated - stunted scrubby thin bush rescued only by Boab trees in my view. There's far more interesting wilderness just about everywhere else! And where you're unlikely to be eaten.

But that said, I think you're awfully harsh about the gorges and most of the natural attractions.

I also think it's a bit bizarre that, by your definition, something seems to have less intrinsic value if it's not at the end of a 10km rough 4wd track. But if rough 4wd tracks is what you want then go to the Bungle Bungles by road. 2 or 3 hours to do 55km, but at the end of it you do see one of the natural wonders of the world!

Personally, I think it's absolutely ludicrous that this magnificent place is hidden away at the end of a terrible goat track, or a very expensive flight. It ought to be available to Aussies of all budgets, just like the similarly iconic and very fragile Grand Canyon is in the USA.

I have a 4wd to get me to interesting places that are otherwise a bit hard to get, not for any intrinsic joy I might derive from driving one. Let's face it, if you want joy from driving, a V8 supercar is going to give you much more!

The Kimberley is, in the main, the very epitome of rustic, largely due to the seasonality of it, but until Aussies are happy to go there in numbers all year round, I don't think that's going to change much.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:22

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:22
Hi Paul

Actually we did do the Bungle on the way in (twice) and its 87km to the main site and only had to walk 200m , so it was good and there was one lovely river crossing - very interesting - but being so far out east I didn't really include it in my comments which were more focussed on the Gibb.
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Follow Up By: Sigmund - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 17:25

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 17:25
Some of the Kimberley is Pindan scrub. Much of it's not.
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:34

Monday, Aug 28, 2017 at 19:34
I will buck the trend.
I reckon the Kimberley is the most extraordinary part of this country.
BUT....
It is also the hardest to see and much of it is 'locked up', so getting access requires the development of relationships with those who hold the 'keys'. That takes time.

I also believe that there has been a concerted effort to eliminate as many free camps as possible in the popular areas in order to force people into commercial camps. I abhor that attitude.
An exception (so far) is the James Price Point area on the Dampier Peninsula.

But if you seek a 4WD challenge, there are plenty. Put the Munja Track and the Carson Track on your list, but there are plenty of others that are easier, but fewer harder than the Carson.

Cheers,
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Reply By: Ron N - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 10:23

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 10:23
I can't really agree that the Kimberley is over-rated. However, I will agree that W.A.'s free camping laws really are bureaucracy gone mad.

But that bureaucracy is a fact of life in every aspect of what we wish to do, today - and I don't like it, a lot of it is just plain over-reaction.

The "no access" signs and rules are the result of small percentage of hoons tearing up the coutryside. The limited camping options and the camping restrictions (24 hr stops only, and 3 day camping limits) are the result of uncaring and deadbeat four-wheel-drivers, leaving campsites in disgusting condition.

So, the authorities react by instituting more and more restrictions, more bans, more closed tracks. It can only get worse. The 3 day camping law is utter and complete BS.

You can't even camp on a property you own yourself, for more than 3 days, without having to apply for council permission - and provide evidence your camping arrangements meet with all the Health Dept laws.

Then, you get around the countryside, and you see people living in absolute pits, on established properties - with rubbish and junk everywhere, and camping in shanties and broken down caravans.
Take a drive around Morrell Park in Broome, if you want to see a classic example of this. 50% of this subdivision wouldn't meet any Health Dept regulations.

The closure of track after track, and camping area after camping area, is simply the effect of too many 4WD owners, and too many dickhead 4WD owners.

I personally think, if we are going to have to live with so much bureaucracy, there should be another law introduced - you should have to pass a major test to determine whether you get to own a 4WD - and issue a 4WD permit, which can be rescinded when you carry out highly unsocial 4WD activities, such as littering camping areas and tearing up fragile ecosystems.

In fact, I'm starting to warm to this idea. I reckon I could make a good Commissioner for 4WD Licences. I'd love to be able to turn some of these ratbag 4WD hoons into Hyundai Getz owners. [;-)

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 15:31

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 15:31
Geez give up on your new job Ron , the last thing we need is another bureaucrap !

I haven't heard of the 3 day law but it sounds like bad news.

I tend to think most people are reasonable if you give them a fair go but so many of our regs are simply so out of touch , fail the common sense test and then get simply ignored , and ignored to the extent that well meaning people wouldn't do anything to right things.
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Follow Up By: Member - nick b boab - Friday, Sep 01, 2017 at 07:49

Friday, Sep 01, 2017 at 07:49
G,day Ron : agree with your comments and love your sarcasm
Agree too many dick heads stuffing it up for everyone else . They have no respect for the country or anyone else and then when they are shut out of some great locations wonder why.
Cheers Nick b
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Reply By: Nacho - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 11:27

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 11:27
Doubt I'll ever go...too many glampers with generators by the sounds of things.
Pity as the scenery looks ok but how many waterfalls do you need to see,
a bit like European Cathedrals....seen one seen em all !
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 13:05

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 13:05
Spot on Nacho, spread the word, the Kimberly is highly over rated

Cheers
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 14:12

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 14:12
Hi Robin

Unfortunately we have only seen a very small section on the eastern Kimberley.

We did not go for the free camps but had a few along the way, including 2 on the Tanami, 1 on the Duncan Road and 2 on the Central Arnhem Highway.

We went to see new country and we thoroughly enjoyed what we did see. The only times that we had to engage 4WD were the 2 lookouts on El Questro as you stated and 4 times in areas around Nhulunbuy were there was some real deep and very soft sand and we never had our MaxTrax with us and some steep and very rutted and washed away descents from escarpment down to the beach.

When we get home, I will give a run down of the area but Eastern Arnhem Land is one place you should add to your bucket list, it was unreal. The aboriginal permits are dead easy to get and those that like to venture into an area that sees far less tourists than it should, plan your next trip up there and you will not be disappointed.


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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 14:36

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 14:36
.

Stephen........... You left home without your MaxTrax ???????????????

Wow!!!!!!

I leave for the Deserts tomorrow and I have been shedding weight......... but the MaxTrax stay.
Although in truth, they have never been used on my vehicle. Touch wood!
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 15:22

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 15:22
I will look forward to that Stephen , another member I know did some new stuff up there last year and it sounds inviting.

Might be the sort of thing one could do and take in next years gathering on way back home !
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 19:48

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 19:48
Hi Allan

Like you I was shedding weight and it was either Fiona or the MaxTrax........so Fiona won out.......lol

I honestly did not believe I would have had a use for them but a couple of places they could have been handy.

Low tyre pressures were the key to success and one thing I can say.......stick to the above high tide marks, as the beach sand mighty look nice and flat, but down you would go and travelling solo, I was not going to take any chances.

Have a great time away and regards to Roz.



Cheers



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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 20:06

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 20:06
Hi Robin

The Northern Land Council are pushing to get more tourists into Nhulunbuy and the way the town is going, tourism will be the big saviour of the town. When Rio Tinto took over the mining side, they shut down the smelting overnight and now ship out the raw material and have it processed overseas.

The end result was the population went from 4000 to 2000 overnight and many businesses closed down.

The town is now holding its head above water and they want the tourist dollar to keep the town going. The next other most important thing to keep in mind is the very serious issue with crocs. The town beach have a daily visitor....a 3 metre croc? Even when we were out at Macassans, the water looked great. We were speaking to a local a few days later and he was telling us that a group of ladies were showing him where they swim in a small rock pool, above the water level.

As they were walking towards the rook pool, there was a croc sunning itself on the rocks at the pool and the women went green and said they did not think that the croc would travel over the rocks.

Start to plan your visit, and will be lots on offer for you to see and do.



Cheers




Stephen
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Reply By: Shaker - Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 17:47

Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017 at 17:47
Robin, I know exactly where you are coming from, the Greenies are locking up this country at an alarming rate!
You are a braver man than me starting a thread with this title, a couple of years back, I would have loved to start one titled " Is Tasmania Over-rated?", but with discretion being the better part of valour, I opted out.

AnswerID: 613377

Reply By: 9900Eagle - Wednesday, Aug 30, 2017 at 08:02

Wednesday, Aug 30, 2017 at 08:02
Nope, nope and nope. One nope would have been enough but it requires 10 letters for an answer.


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Reply By: PhilD - Thursday, Aug 31, 2017 at 20:56

Thursday, Aug 31, 2017 at 20:56
The Kimberley is magnificent, particularly if you venture away from people. Been there 5 times in the past 12 years, so that gives some idea of how I enjoy it. Returned a month or so ago from doing the Carson Track. Got to King George Falls, and saw no one for 8 days. Had a fantastic time.
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Reply By: Motherhen - Sunday, Sep 03, 2017 at 21:30

Sunday, Sep 03, 2017 at 21:30
So many replies - I cannot read them all. We are travelling and I only look in occasionally. To me, the Kimberley is the best part of all this wonderful continent.

In 2007 they tried to stop free camping where there was no toilets along the Gibb River Road. With increasing numbers of travellers, inconsiderate toileting was creating a problem, particularly along rivers and streams which were popular campsites. Fair enough. There are old gravel pits along the Gibb River Road which some still use for camping (for those with their own toilets or willing to do it right).

Motherhen

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