Prevention of Dingo attack

Submitted: Friday, Nov 03, 2017 at 23:52
ThreadID: 135826 Views:3751 Replies:13 FollowUps:17
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Hi there,

Sometimes I wonder when I'm walking the dog over some remote range how many dingos are watching us.
I'd like to do some more exploring like this with the dog in tow.

What is the best way to prevent/react a dingo attack?

I'm interested in your suggestions from preventative to reactive measures.

Preventative could include scents to avoid tracking.

Reactive is more likely I would think. I do not have a high velocity weapon, however have some blades.
What about sonic protection or some sort of pepper spray? - I would rather have an injured dingo than a dead one.

Poor old Massie is a Kelpie, so will not be much use in a direct fight.

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Alan

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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 07:31

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 07:31
Hi Alan

Have you ever thought of getting some company for Massie?

One dog that will never let you down is a Heeler and will stand it's ground when push comes to shove.

We have had a few over the years and once they are a mature dog, will not back down and not let you down. Last year our most faithful old girl of over 16 years had to be put down,

Like you, we also have a Kelpie, and when we see your Massie, you would swear it is our Rusty. When our Millie past away, he was one very sad dog and to be honest he was a lost dog. Like Rustie, I shed many tears and after 7 months went looking for another Heeler and not quite 12 months ago purchased a great little Red Heeler.

They get on like a house on fire and you can not seperate them, they are just real true mates. Once he grows into a big boy, he will be the most faithful friend, and heelers will not be afraid of a dingo. We know lots of station people and their dogs have never been taken by dingos and when they hear them, will quite often race off and scare them away.

Just food for thought, but they are one small dog that has real " Balls " when it comes to protecting you.




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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 12:45

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 12:45
Hi Stephen,
Sorry to hear about your mate. They are great companions.

As much as I could be the local dog man - I'm not really in a position to get Massie a mate. I don't think my sanity will allow it to be honest, just one is a handful.

I guess I'm more concerned with the dogs safety than that of my own. As Massie has no choice as to where she gets taken it is really my responsibility to ensure her safety.

All the best
Alan

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 13:36

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 13:36
Hi Alan

Thanks for that, and after 16 years they are a real part of your like.

Millie was just unreal and such a faithful dog and was never more than 6 inches from me at any time.

Now we have Oscar, Rusty is now the boss and brings Oscar into line when the playing gets a little rough.

They travel great together and they look out for each other all the time.

I know 2 dogs is a big ask for many people, but it is great to see how much better they are when they have a mate.

You can see who is the boss from the photo below, when we were bush camped on our way to Nhulunbuy. You have to be quick when you leave your chair, as Rusty love to relax on it as well......lol


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Reply By: Dusty D - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 07:50

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 07:50
I would be more concerned about the possibility of your dog picking up a 1080 bait if you are wandering around in dingo country.

Dingos are fairly timid animals and will usually give you a wide berth, but some of the wild cross bred dogs are a different story. On some of my gold detecting trips over west, I have come across small packs of wild dogs that I have scared off with an aerosol canister horn that I carry to use as an emergency signal if needed. It frightens the bejeebers out of the dogs.

Just for the record, I'm pretty sure pepper spray is banned in all states.

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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 10:05

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 10:05
As Dusty has said, be more worried about your dog picking up a 1080 bait. It's not a pretty site to see a dog die from 1080 poisoning.

Also it's not dingos that could present a threat but the cross bred mongrels that seem to be becoming more numerous. Back in 1998 we camped at Durba Springs while on our trip down the CSR. Even back then there were quite a few of them hanging around mainly after dark, but wouldn't come too close to our camp. However hunger can make them a bit more unpredictable.

Personally all I have ever carried is a good length stout stick or long shovel handle.
Never actually had to use one to ward off a dog or anything else but......

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 12:54

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 12:54
Thanks Dusty and Pop.

Good point about the cross breeds, I'll have to take those into consideration.
1080 I'm aware of and I mostly go well out of the agricultural zones in my travels as a consequence.

Canister Horns sounds like a good plan then.

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Alan

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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 08:00

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 08:00
Hi Alan

Can't help much with the deterent bit, but I'm sure Massie would be devasted to know you think she's 'Old' - she'll probably never look you in the eye again.


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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 08:05

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 08:05
Hi Alan

I just had a thought - what about a 'ging' or 'shangeye' or 'Sling shot' - although not sure if there are legal issues.

https://www.outdoorswarehouse.com.au/Slingshots



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Follow Up By: Dusty D - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 08:17

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 08:17
Slingshots are only legal in Qld, Tassie and the ACT. Banned in all other states.

Dusty
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Follow Up By: Gramps - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 08:57

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 08:57
So "baitcasters" are illegal ? Well I'll be ;)

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Follow Up By: gbc - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 10:16

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 10:16
I believe it is the presence of an arm brace that makes them illegal? It’s been a while. Dingo/s won’t attack until they are confident they are going to eat. Nothing short of a rifle is going to help at that point. Attacks on travellers aren’t very common. Places like northern south Australia outside the dog fence there is hardly anything alive except dogs. I’d be worried about the pooch out there.
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Reply By: tonysmc - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 11:13

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 11:13
Co2 extinguishers work a treat, however a bit big to carry around. why not carry a BLA Safety Gas Horn - Small, W/Canister $20 at BCF. Also never try to run away or turn your back on them. First try to walk away watching them at all times and if they come at you run at them making as much noise as possible. A retractable lead for your dog is also good as your dog can still sniff around and investigate new territory but you can always pull then back close to you.
https://www.ebay.com.au/sch/i.html?_nkw=retractable%20lead&ssPageName=GSTL
Tony
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 14:34

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 14:34
Cheers Tony,
Some of those BLA gas horns are fairly compact, which is a plus.

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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 12:02

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 12:02
Unless WA dingoes are different to NT & Qld dingoes, Alan, you shouldn't have any dramas in daylight hours. They will tend to keep a respectful distance until they lose interest, or perhaps become more interested.

Night time is a different story, and they can often become quite brazen, venturing close to your camp. Short of a heavy firearm, the suggestions about the air horn would be most practical as a deterrent. Once an aggressive dog is close enough to use sticks, shovels and other implements, you'd want to hope he hasn't SMS'd any of his mates!

Keep Massie on a lead, especially at night, as 2 dogs can really get on top of a single domestic dog. I've spent a lot of years in dingo country and have never had any worries.

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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 12:24

Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 12:24
Thanks for the advice Bob,
The dog pack situation is one I would have the greatest trouble with I'm sure.
Air Horn is definitely on the shopping list now.

Cheers
Alan

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Reply By: Iza B - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 14:36

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 14:36
The more pure the bloodline, the less your concerns should be. Purebred dingos appear shy and avoid people. Hybrid dogs are another matter! Packs of these hybrid dogs are an increasing problem in SEQ.

Domestic dogs in the bush can only really be protected if they sleep in a cage on the back of the truck, at night. Tying one up beside the swag is not so good; Mate had his pillow swiped in the middle of the night.

Dingos are watchers. One professional shooter I know always stands off from a trap about 300 metres and scans for dogs/dingos looking at the one in the trap. Typically gets two scalps per initial result. A successful trap site is always reset and often results in another two scalps.

The purest dingo bloodlines are in the north of SA, extending into the NT and into WA, a considerable distance. Biosecurity Queensland has maps of dingo purity bloodlines as part of their ongoing efforts to kill of the wild dog population.

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Reply By: Member - mark I - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 16:46

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 16:46
Hi,
Last year on our way to Uluru we camped on the Finke river at Glen Helen, we had been away for 3 months so were very aware of the predators at night as our small dog would often alert us to anyone or thing in the near vicinity.

We have a Cub camper and the dog would sleep inside on the floor, usually we dont bother doing up the zips, just letting the canvas fall down in place.

Because our dog will let us know of anything around we have her on a short lead tied to the poles at the back of the camper. In the middle of the night there was an almighty commotion that awoke us, we presume that a dingo or wild dog stuck its nose in the camper and grabbed our small dog by the neck and tried to run off with it but was met with resistance from the lead and my wife screaming.

The next day after looking at the gash in the dogs neck we decided to go back to Alice to get the Vet to have a look. After parting with a few hundred dollars the dog was good to go. The wound was left open to heal by itself. The Vet told us there are a lot of small domestic dogs taken by dingoes, especially around Alice Springs.

A lesson learned the night was to make sure the lead was shorter than than normal.

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Follow Up By: Member - mark I - Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 16:48

Saturday, Nov 04, 2017 at 16:48
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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 19:35

Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 19:35
Hi Mark,
Thanks for the story and lesson. Glad the little one is OK.
They are cunning aren't they..

Cheers
Alan

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Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Wednesday, Nov 08, 2017 at 12:18

Wednesday, Nov 08, 2017 at 12:18
Wow - that is a unique story. Never heard or seen this. Thanks for sharing. Has made me rethink a few things too.
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Reply By: Batt's - Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 00:28

Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 00:28
I've never had any trouble with dingo's yet does anyone think having a dog with you will make them a little more inquisitive does that sound plausible.
I know in QLD the guys that read meter boxes carry spray but they quite often need in not sure if the public can but the wind has to be on your side so in a panic it may work against you. The air horn sounds like a good idea but slowly condition you dog to the noise or he may run off.
It reminds me I think it was last yr on ABC nightlife they talked to some old timers one in QLD, one in NSW they said they use to carry a gun just about every where in the bush in their day it was the norm. If you saw a wild cat or dog you shot it I'm not saying to shot a dingo because it's there but maybe their also coming closer to people now because there is more competition out there these days eating their food. Less people are shooting the pests because the laws have become to strict and made some people scared or suspicious if they see a hunter with a fire arm which was not an uncommon site once. I'm not trying to get off track but there has to be a logical explanation as to why there are so many encounters these days also yeah more land cleared and larger population would also be just part of it.
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Reply By: Member - Bigfish - Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 10:59

Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 10:59
I spent 15 years living in Gove. Saw many dingo's in town and out bush. Wife was walking our terrier cross in a small shopping arcade early one morning, on a lead, when a dingo attacked and tried to run off with it. Missus screamed and pulled dog off the dingo. Luckily the bastard fled. Dog ended up at vet requiring stiches and was lucky to live. I know of a few people who have lost dogs to dingo packs. German shepards, heelers, terriers.Dingo is a very cunning animal and prefers to hunt in packs. If your dog is faced with a dingo mob it wont matter if it is a heeler, rottweiler or pit-bull...odds are it wont survive. I actually witnessed a mob of 5 pull a large boar down and kill it. Followed the chase from above in a chopper. Always heard them howling at night. I lived in a street light lit street with plenty of houses. They have a lot of patience and as I said...as cunning as an ozzie pollie!!
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 11:36

Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 11:36
Excellent that's a bit of an eye opener for most some of the things you've seen and heard are things most of us probably never would have know about their nature. So their opportunist and are most probably attracted by other dogs even if there with their owner and are willing to take on other dogs of a similar size which they might believe is an easier target.

That's another reason why over the yrs people say to stand tall and don't bend down to a wild animals level or they may think your smaller and an easier target.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 11:58

Sunday, Nov 05, 2017 at 11:58
I don't know if it's still there but a while back there was a video on Youtube of a 'roo in a standoff with a good sized dingo. The one thing I remember was that the 'roo stood as tall as it could and eventually the dingo gave up and went on it's way.

Cheers
Pop
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Reply By: Cheryl & Ian (NSW) - Monday, Nov 06, 2017 at 17:05

Monday, Nov 06, 2017 at 17:05
Hi Alan,

There is a citronella spray called Spray Shield that is used to stop dog attacks. Can't see why it wouldn't work on dingo's as well.

http://animal-care.com.au/index.php/Animal-Attack-Deterrents/Spray-Shield/flypage.tpl

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Follow Up By: equinox - Monday, Nov 06, 2017 at 21:56

Monday, Nov 06, 2017 at 21:56
Hi Cheryl,

That looks pretty good. I wonder if you could use it as a night-time camp deterrent - apply it on a few bushes away from camp ?

Cheers
Alan

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Follow Up By: Cheryl & Ian (NSW) - Tuesday, Nov 07, 2017 at 17:14

Tuesday, Nov 07, 2017 at 17:14
I like your thinking Alan.

Citronella is a well known pet deterrent and it is also used in products to stop dogs/cats eliminating on your grass. One such product is called 'Keep Off Dog and Cat Repellent'. That type of product may work better on bushes.

I might add some of both in our camping kit. Thanks for raising the topic.

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Follow Up By: Lakers - Wednesday, Nov 08, 2017 at 16:04

Wednesday, Nov 08, 2017 at 16:04
There is also a spray called Crib Stop...http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Joseph-Lyddy-Crib-Stop-Spray-Horses-Dogs-chewing-windsucking-500ml-FREE-POSTAGE/111386638769?epid=1611579753&hash=item19ef2939b1:g:QWgAAOSwZqZZ9SNT

A major ingredient is capsicum, although it is not pepper spray as such. After having been downwind and getting a good whiff of this stuff I would suggest a well aimed squirt of this would seriously distract any two or four legged animal from staying the course.

Cheers
Greg
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Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Monday, Nov 06, 2017 at 17:33

Monday, Nov 06, 2017 at 17:33
We have a Kelpie and have never had a Dingo near us in the outback. True wild Dingo's tend to be very timid but have been told towns are a different matter. We are very mindful of wild dogs. Seen some very big bastards north of Warri Gate at night
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Reply By: Member - Robyn R4 - Sunday, Nov 12, 2017 at 09:49

Sunday, Nov 12, 2017 at 09:49
Making yourself look taller makes sense.
A ranger at Kingfisher Bay Resort (Fraser Island) told us about the day she watched a dingo stalking a child at the water's edge. The child was probably about 8 and, because she was a distance away from the dingo, would've looked about the size of a wallaby, so the ranger said. She had to run up behind it and yell at the child and parents (not far away).

Not that this strategy of looking taller would be any help to a dog, but it may be a thought to be kept in the back of the mind for people...
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