Fresh Veg on Remote Trips

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 11:49
ThreadID: 136363 Views:2049 Replies:12 FollowUps:41
This Thread has been Archived
Short remote and touring type trips aren't a problem. On longer remote trips, I usually start with a few basic (hard) vegetables and then revert to canned and dehydrated varieties as the trip progresses. Unfortunately, the longevity can be a bit hit and miss and planned meals often need rethinking on the run. We are getting ready for an extended and remote trip and can't rely on supplies from remote communities, but will restock if available.

I'm after advice/ideas for storing, transporting and prolonging the life of fresh veg on such trips. Also what veg travels best?

Trip will be 8 weeks with the remote section being 6 weeks. Weight and space (as always) is a consideration however supplies will be split over 3 vehicles.

Thanks in advance.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 12:01

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 12:01
The first problem is that you can not take fresh fruit and vegetables across borders easily.
We tend to have large "cook-ups" where Margaret prepares meals with lots of vegies and then freezes them in zip top bags in meal size portions.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
AnswerID: 617335

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:19

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:19
Thanks for the reply. This is how we go on shorter les remote trips.

We won't be crossing state borders on this trip.

We will be taking some prepared meals with us, but these will be mainly meat based due to number of people and space limitations. I had considered frozen veggies, we will take some, but again need to consider space.

I am keen to hear how and what people transport without using fridge/freezer.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888920

Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 12:30

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 12:30
Dont forget you can't take fruit and vegies across state borders either. Thats always our biggest problem. We chop ours up which makes it legal but we tend to buy on the trip. Surprising how much you can get from even the smallest towns
AnswerID: 617336

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:26

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:26
Thanks for the reply Ivan.

As mentioned above, we won't be crossing state borders on this trip.

Unfortunately, we will not be accessing towns/communities during the remote section of the trip so won't be able to restock. As mentioned in the OP, we will purchase from sources enroute if able - which will be confirmed prior to departure. Strong believer in supporting smaller communities, but don't want to deplete their limited stocks.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 888921

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:29

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:29
.
Ivan, here we go with the "legal" again...... Iza will be on to you. lol

But I did not know "chopping them up" made it acceptable.
I have not seen that in the Quarantine Guide.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888922

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:41

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:41
Agree Allan.

I always thought they had to be "processed" to limit the risk of carrying nasties - I'm not sure I want to say the "L" word.

By processed,I was told at the Ceduna Station they had to be peeled, chopped and partly or fully cooked!

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888924

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 14:03

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 14:03
.
Anthony, I see you are from WA. Lots of remote areas to explore there without crossing State borders. You are fortunate. Our trips that way from Qld cross several borders.

You mention Ceduna quarantine station...... sore point with me! We picked up some fresh supplies in Port Augusta SA then proceeded down Goog's Track and headed into Ceduna for more supplies before going west still in SA.
At the Q-station, which is (conveniently) close to Ceduna rather than at the SA/WA border, we were treated as WA visitors and stripped of our veggies. No amount of reasoning could convince them that we had not come from WA, even with Qld plates!

The map reveals that it is possible to come down Goog's and go east before reaching the Eyre Hwy to get to Ceduna. Next time I'll know!
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 888925

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 17:38

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 17:38
Not just 'chopping them' up, but cooking them, such as par-boiling and freezing. Like Peter and Margaret, we have a 'cook up' prior to quarantine borders, but Anthony has already said borders is not an issue.

Anthony, like you do, we go through fresh, to canned, to dehydrated. Not much canned, due to weight.

I will send you a private message about vegetables that last longest.

Allan, we lost fresh produce which we thought we were OK with having purchasing within the FFEZ in Victoria, but still lost it at the South Australian Border. So we no know that.

Better to be safe that sorry Allan, and I fully support very strict quarantine measures. There is always some fool that tries to trick then, so like anything in life and travelling, the majority suffer the strict rules made for the small minority.

Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 888932

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 17:46

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 17:46
I missed adding frozen vegetables between fresh and canned in reply above.
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888933

Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 20:24

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 20:24
From Wa quarantine document for Vegies
"Provided it is cut up and pre-washed, small amounts up to about 1kg for personal consumption are permitted entry - subject to passing inspection at a WA checkpoint. It can contain fruit product such as tomato/cucumber/capsicum etc. provided it has been cut up into bite sized pieces. Items such as cherry tomatoes (already bite size) must be cut at least into halves. "
We have seen this multiple times at border crossings.
0
FollowupID: 888936

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 20:29

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 20:29
Do present cut up and peeled vegetables for inspection, and make sure no soil is present. I do this peeling potatoes and onions to last for the next few days when we return to Western Australia.

Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888937

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 17:42

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 17:42
@Allan

Sounds like the same part of the trip we did when we went around Austrlia. I just reversed up a bit from the Checkpoint, pulled over to the left and peeled and cooked all of the vege that we had and put it into the freezer, the fruit I made into a fruit salad and put into the fridge. When we went back through, they were happy with that until I gave them the rubbish bag full of peelings.

Normally, I keep all my peelings (and meat bones from roasts and chops over a few days(freeze if necessary) and cook them into soup when we get to a camp kitchen - sounds yuk! But cooked low and slow with a few extras it makes a beaut soup which we freeze for later - food for nothing and the skins are where the best nutrients are.

@Motherhen

Thanks for that look forward to the Private Mesage. From your reply further down, when we went back through Penong, the Caravan Park Lady told us to take the entire contents of the "Goody Basket" in the laundry because the park was empty and they didn't want it to go to waste. I like the idea of food not going to waste.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 888967

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 17:46

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 17:46
Did you not get my message Anthony? Darn, I typed up quite a big one :(. I don't think it was too long to not go, and thought it showed as sent.
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888968

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:00

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:00
Message recieved and Understood.

Wait out for reply!

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888972

Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:14

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:14
.
Certainly, Peter has identified a problem greater than the keeping or carrying qualities of vegetables..... State Quarantine! The Interstate Quarantine, a Traveller's Guide may be of help. There are tables to define what can and cannot be taken into the various States.

We travel remote for several weeks at a time and avoid trying for the "Gourmet Camp Cooking". But we care still able to enjoy tasty and nutritious meals. We pre-prepare some meat & veg meals and either dehydrate and vacuum pack them and/or freeze them. Supplement that with solid vegetables such as potato, onion, carrot, etc. Sweet potato carries and lasts well and is very versatile in recipes. Pumpkin carries and lasts well until cut. Apples, oranges, nuts are OK. Sweetcorn on the cob is good. Eggs good but need to be packed carefully. Meat lasts for many weeks if properly vacuum packed then refrigerated. Some commercially dried vegetables such as peas work well and canned vegetables such as potato, peas, baked beans, and sweetcorn are good. Commercial dried mash potato has improved over the years but don't expect too much of it.... good on a shepherd's pie. Canned tuna features largely on our menu. Pasta forms a good base for many meals. Some pre-packed dried 'camping meals' are OK, some not so. Try them at home first. Same with canned meat meals.
Roz seems to conjure up surprisingly delicious meals from some pretty basic ingredients.

Connie Sue Beadell and Mick Hutton conduct 'Beadell Tours' and are out in the deserts for five months of every year. They need to be particularly thoughtful of their catering needs. Amazingly, they carry no refrigeration. On their website Connie has published "Food and Self Catering Tips" which you may find useful. In particular, they advocate wrapping each vegetable item separately in newspaper. We have followed this recommendation and it certainly seems to prolong the freshness. Alas, fresh salads are not on the menu. Lettuce is certainly out of the question.

We have very simple and quick lunches. Usually a couple of large 'Salada' dry biscuits with a topping. Here is where we learned a vey good idea from Connie Beadell..... Plain cheese on a biscuit or in a sandwich can be difficult to swallow, literally. Put a slice of canned beetroot on it and it slides down without trouble. Tuna also goes well. We encountered one family where the young mother handed each kid a 95g tin of tuna and some dry biscuits for lunch. She had hundreds of tuna cans onboard!

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 617338

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:36

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 13:36
Hi Allan, thanks for the reply.

No border or quarantine issues on this trip.

You have pretty much nailed the way and what we eat on most trips, especially the shorter remote ones. Keen not to rely to heavily on refrigeration as it is subject to failure.

Off to read Connie Sues page and will come back to you.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888923

Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 14:02

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 14:02
There's an extensive article with regard to the transport of fruits and vegetables in the link below - and the last page gives a very extensive chart of all the fruits and vegetables, showing maximum lifespan in transport, and best temperatures and humidity levels, to extract the maximum lifespan.

Research Gate - Fruit and Vegetable Transportation

In essence, it's difficult to transport fresh produce - particularly the delicate leafy vegetables - for long periods without some form of cooling well below ambient temperatures.

Vehicles are not the ideal vehicle for fruit and vegie transportation because they are always hot inside - or they heat up quickly once they're moving.

It's important to understand which fruits or vegetables generate a lot of ethylene gas, which gas plays a big part in ripening and also ruining a lot of the more delicate vegetables.
By keeping the biggest ethylene-gas-generating fruits and vegetables separate from other fruits and vegetables, you prolong the life of your other, more delicate F&V.

You can buy a product from Coles or Woolies which is a sachet that you install in your vegetable cooler cabinet, and this sachet claims to extend the life of F&V in the cabinet by absorbing ripening and destructive odours.

It's called Keep Fresh - and Choice did a controlled test on the product, and it does work.
However, it also has its limitations, and it is designed to work with refrigerated F&V's.

Choice - Keep Fresh test

By far the greatest factor in F&V transportation and use is to ensure that the F&V products that you're acquiring, are as fresh as you can get them.

That is why we prefer farmers markets where possible. The big stores utilise extensive distribution networks and major storage centres - and the F&V's are often 10 days old, when you get them! - yet they claim they are "the Fresh Food people"! What a load of hogwash!!

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 617339

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 17:56

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 17:56
Thanks for the reply Ron.

You first link would be fantastic if I was hauling a 40 foot refrigerated trailer as it relates to bulk haulage of fresh produce. Unfortunately, were only in 4WD's.

I don't use the Keep Fresh device, but I do use a similar one - it looks like a blue apple. It is very effective at prolonging the fruit and vege on our touring type trips and will definately becoming on this trip.

The freshness of the fruit and vege we can source form the remote communities, immediately prior to us going remote will indeed be on the outer limits. Unfortunately, this is what these places get on a regular basis. Also, the amount we require may impact on their stocks. I am investigating preordering with a couple of communities for them to order and hold until we get there.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 888971

Reply By: Member - J&A&KK - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 14:47

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 14:47
Anthony

We have found the following packing methods useful to prolonging the life of some vegetables.

Cauliflower, Broccoli, Lettuce - wrap up first with one layer of paper towel, then wrap up in 2-3 layers of newspaper.

Cut Pumpkin - wrap in one layer of grease proof paper making sure the cut section is covered. Then wrap in 2-3 layers of newspaper.

If there is no room in the fridge then put them in the coolest place you can find. Obviously the lettuce won’t last too long outside the fridge. We have had it last more than a week when wrapped as above and refrigerated.

Cheers John
John
"There are naive questions, tedious questions...There is no such thing as a dumb question" Carl Sagan

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 617340

Follow Up By: rocco2010 - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 15:13

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 15:13
John

On one of my first outback trips on the CSR a decade or so ago I was stunned when a lady in the group, a veteran outback traveller from Victoria, produced what appeared to be a fresh lettuce.

She had bought it in Kalgoorlie more than a week prior. It was kept wrapped in newspaper in a cool part of the car during the day and brought out a night for a "freshen up" in the cool.

And cool it was, with temperatures in the desert near freezing!

Cheers

2
FollowupID: 888927

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:35

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:35
Thanks for the replies.

@ John

That is exactly the type of info I'm chasing. I normally just put mine in a box with the Food Saver (Blue Apple) in a cool spot. I've found a cardboard banana box is better than a polystyrene (esky)type box.

My pumpkin is normally wrapped in cling film after cutting - is there an advantage of using the grease proof paper?

@ rocco2010

I like the idea of fresh egg and lettuce sandwiches some where in the remote north.

We normally store our vege box in the 4WD and bring it out in the cool of the day. I'm starting to get the idea that wrapping the produce in newspaper is the way to go.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888976

Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 21:39

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 21:39
Anthony - I've found one of the most effective wraps for keeping vegetables in, is paper towelling - and "Viva" brand seems to be the best for that.

The paper towelling seems to allow the vegetables to "breathe" better, whilst stopping dehydration.

Cheers, Ron.
1
FollowupID: 888989

Reply By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 19:04

Saturday, Mar 03, 2018 at 19:04
Anthony
I find carrots last well and when grated they add a freshness to your lunches when lettuce etc is long gone.
Cucumbers (Apple or Lebanese) also have a reasonable life outside of refridgeration (when it's not hot), just don't squash them
Neither I expect would last a month, but they will get you well past the Lettuce gone stage.
Take a stroll through your nearest Asian food store, they have lots of dried foods which add variety to meat and 3 veg when fresh food is,limited
Mark
AnswerID: 617345

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:43

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:43
Thanks for the reply Mark.

I like the idea of substituting lettuce for the carrot - some else also suggested using beetroot as well.

I take zucchini - it lasts quite well. I haven't seen Apple cucumbers for some time in the shops so I will have to find someone who grows them.

I hadn't thought about going to an Asian Grocery for ideas, but will have a look. We do have a few in our area. I do a pretty mean wild mushroom risotto that is made entirely from dry ingredients (except the water for stock). I even cook it at home now.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888978

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:57

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:57
.
Anthony, Yes of course, risotto. I forgot the rice. We use a lot of it. Nothing carries like rice. Very versatile and nutritious (I think?)
Can be used in sweets too. Love cooled boiled rice with milk. And of course we use cartons of long-life milk.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888980

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 19:10

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 19:10
Allan, try brown rice cooked with a chicken stock cubes (few dried herbs if you like) nice nutty flavour and a little more exciting than plain white rice.

Cold rice and milk has to have sugar on it (according to my wife) - I like golden syrup, honey or treacle (God! I love treacle - just not good for me).

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 888984

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 19:26

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 19:26
Anthony,

Sunrice do some neat little containers of various types of rice, brown, white & maybe jasmine, that are great to add to other meals, or as an add-on.

Already cooked so savings on gas, water & maybe time. 1 serve per person, unless someone doesn’t like rice.

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 888986

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 00:38

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 00:38
Gday Bob

Hope your well!

I think I have seen those precooked rice packets, are they the ones in the plastic bag that you reheat in the microwave? For our shorter trips they would be fantastic but we won't be taking a microwave on this trip. Dry rice might be the go for this particular trip.

I need to be very aware of "what we take in has to be taken out". More so for this trip than our others. Six weeks of rubbish festering in the heat ain't going to be to good! Burn and bury isn't an option this time. We will be taking some of those blue drums with a screw on lid (about 50-60lts) for all our non organic waste to be bought out.

By the way - how is the Walting Matilda Centre progressing?

Cheers

Anthony

VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888994

Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 16:11

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 16:11
Hi Guys,

I think "Uncle Bens" have precooked rice.

Macca.
Macca.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 889003

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 17:35

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 17:35
Yeah, know the microwaveable pouches you referred too, Anthony. These others are in a small, 1 cup container per photo below.



As well as these 3 varieties, they do white as well.

WMC is progressing well, though believe they have moved from 3-4 weeks ahead during the building stage, to some weeks(???) behind with all the interior fittings, landscaping, electrical, aircons, & IT work ongoing. Finished or not, the party is still on, and over 5K tickets have been sold for the Way Out West festival.

Last 3-4 days, Winton and surrounding district has had around 200mm and in places more, of good, soaking rain, so streams are running and in a week or so should start to look a picture. Bring plenty of memory cards for your cameras if attending, and some Natures Botanical "Cedarwood & Rosemary" to ward off the potential fly threat.

Enjoy your desert trip, Anthony, we are heading into the WA areas mid- year too.


Bob


Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 889005

Reply By: Member - Lyncol - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 11:29

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 11:29
on our first remote trip we used a foam container that the vegetables came in, we wrapped them in news paper etc but sweated so had to leave lid off occasionally.A few years ago I was lucky enough to win a waeco 41l esky, have installed an old computer fan in the side of esky for air circulation, we then put a freezer block inside which lasts the day then swap it the next morning with another. This works heaps better, will send some pictures of this mod next week.
AnswerID: 617359

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:50

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:50
Thanks for the reply Lyncol.

I used to use a polystyrene type box and found the same thing (with the sweating). I currently use a cardboard banana box which lets it breathe (although Allan's friends at Ceduna Quarantine Station took it of us - even though it was from Queensland, had travelled to WA and was now on a return trip to Qld - you have to ask yourself sometimes)

I like the idea of your esky, ice blocks and cooling fan. I would probably use bottles of water - just another source if needed/

Look forward to the photos. Might PM you for some finer details.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888979

Follow Up By: Member - Lyncol - Tuesday, Mar 06, 2018 at 23:43

Tuesday, Mar 06, 2018 at 23:43
Here are photos of the esky with fan for air circulation, had old computer so took it out of that, 2 male merit plugs and 1 female , I used 4 mm wire and 1amp fuse . Cut hole in esky and used silicon adhesive to secure it, this particular fan has 3 speed switch attached. These fan basically take nothing to run so can be left on 24-7. Anyway take a look it works for us.
3
FollowupID: 889040

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 00:13

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 00:13
That looks fantastic Lyncol!

Much more advanced than my banana box. I definately think something like this is going to be coming with me on the trip.

I can see this, combined with the frozen water bottles and harder type veggies, will be the answer to storing the veggies for as long as possible.

Can I ask - Why does the plug have two male and a female Merritt plug?

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 889041

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 00:16

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 00:16
Deerrr!

I just worked it out - a brain fart on my part!

To connect from the vehicle female plug to the esky female plug and still have female socket to connect other things to.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 889042

Follow Up By: Member - Lyncol - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 22:31

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 22:31
If the esky is full I leave the drain plug out it tends to circulate better, next trip we are going to try not wrapping some vegetables which ones that’s up to the main cook! All trial and error but that’s the beauty of mods.
0
FollowupID: 889069

Reply By: Member - DingoBlue(WA) - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 12:08

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 12:08
No one has mentioned cabbage. It keeps very well and can be made into Coleslaw to have with main meal or as a snack on it's own.
Rather a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 617360

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 15:42

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 15:42
Yes, cabbage is one of the longer lasting vegetables on my list.
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888963

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:58

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 18:58
Hi DingoBlue,

Thanks for the reply.

Cabbage is one of my staples (along with carrots and potatoes) and is a good long lasting traveller. When I lived in Manjimup, I would get several of the 'too small for the market' cabbages from a grower mate, as each could be eaten over a couple of days or in one sitting (depending on numbers). All I seem to be able to get these days is quite large ones.

BTW the heart or core of the cabbage is great if you want to add a peppery flavour to your food. I cook and mix it into mashed potato and soups. On the smaller cabbages it can be quite sweet. My two boys will fight for it.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888981

Reply By: Steve - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 13:55

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 13:55
My cook always cooks up a big tureen of Ratatouille and rides it into meal size portions for freezing. Ready made accompaniment for fish, or any meats, even snags. Helps if you love the stuff as we do.
AnswerID: 617361

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 19:05

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 19:05
Hi Steve

Thanks for the reply.

Ratatouille is a great idea. Last time I had it was when my old mum was alive (well over 20 years ago). She used to do it like a parmagarne with melted cheese on top.

I don't mind eggplant - I wonder how it would travel? Biggest problem would probably be squashing it. I'm sure it would last - all my Mediterranean mates parents growing up always had a box of them on the back verandah.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 888982

Follow Up By: Steve - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 19:53

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 19:53
Originally a French dish/accompaniment but we always have some hanging around at home. I love it on toast, just for a light lunch but it’s one of those dishes where you can vary it according to your preference or whatever you have handy to put in. We do tend to stick to Mediterranean ingredients but you don’t have to be at all fanatical about it. It isn’t really critical but the one thing I makes sure goes in without compromise, is garlic and plenty of it. Don’t mind a bit of Parmesan to sprinkle on top but really, a dish you can make to suit yourself. So easy to make, not expensive, goes with almost anything and easy to keep in the Fridge or freezer. I do like my salad with a bit of steak but this stuff is one of my faves. Excellent with lamb chops or any other lamb cut.
This has to be one of the easiest pre-cooked foods to travel with. You could even make on the road from tinned stuff. Tomatoes, peas, corn, cubed spud, even a bit of apple... anything really as long as it has garlic garlic garlic ... :) one of those things that improves with storage when the flavours intermingle. You need a sprinkle of herbs but just dried oregano will do. Google recipes but be flexible.
0
FollowupID: 889007

Reply By: Member - Ernie S2 - Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 20:28

Sunday, Mar 04, 2018 at 20:28
I find the vacuum sealing of meat and vegies (carrots, cabbage, celery, tomatoes ) works well with just the Engel on Ref. Not frozen!
And when I crossed into SA I had all my veggies chopped up fine and in the fridge, The OFFICER of the day took them! Said we had fruit fly in WA and he could not take the risk of letting my "salad" go into SA. Could not be bothered arguing. I reckon the Pri-- was being just that. A Pri--!
AnswerID: 617370

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 00:01

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 00:01
Hi Ernie

Thanks for the reply.

When you cryo your veggies, are they raw, cooked o partly cooked? Also, how much longer do you think you get compared to not doing anything to them?

I take it your run in with the Quarantine was in Ceduna? Seems a pattern is developing!

Just a totally irrelevant side story (but connected to the Quarintine station)

On our first trip to Ceduna, we were having lunch down on the jetty where my two boys befriended a couple of the local kids. They came up and were talking to my wife and I when she asked (being a teacher) What was the best thing about Ceduna? Without even thinking, the kids all chorused 'The big oyster!' She asked them about the big oyster and they told us we had to go see it. "Where is it?" She asked. "Out at the Quarintine Station" they replied.

Now remember we were parked at the station cooking veggies and fruit for nearly 2 1/2 hours(albeit on the WA side)- we completely missed it. So we went back out to the Station to find the "Big Oyster". Drove through the station twice organs completely missed it again.

On the way back through, we asked the same quarantine officer where it was- he pointed through the station - and there it was "The Big Oyster!" That's when I knew the where pulling the piss! It looked like, and was only slightly bigger than the old cement clam flowerpot on my nan as front porch.

If you've seen it - you will appreciate it.



Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 888993

Follow Up By: Member - Ernie S2 - Tuesday, Mar 06, 2018 at 15:30

Tuesday, Mar 06, 2018 at 15:30
I have found that vaccuum sealing and keeping them in the Engel lasts for weeks. Even the meat. And it was Ceduna where the "officer" took my salad. I did say to him that I did not know fruit fly got into carrots or cabbages. He just grunted!
Cheers
0
FollowupID: 889027

Follow Up By: Member - Ernie S2 - Tuesday, Mar 06, 2018 at 15:35

Tuesday, Mar 06, 2018 at 15:35
Vegies are raw when sealed. But not sensitive stuff like lettuce. Most of the other tougher stuff is fine. And I do not think I missed much not seeing the "Big" Oyster. Deeerrrrrrrhhh.
0
FollowupID: 889028

Reply By: KiwiAngler - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 20:10

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 20:10
I've been on the road, fulltime now, for almost 9 years and have found these to work well for me

https://www.woolworths.com.au/shop/productdetails/2824/fresh-crisp-bags-medium
AnswerID: 617376

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 21:46

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 21:46
Hi T...

Was going to PM you on the other site.

I have seen these type of bags before, my mum used a similar thing years ago - from memory they were a light green colour. I know they work well in the fridge, but how do you go storing excess/stores veg outside the fridge? Or do your travels allow for more frequent resupplies. Also what types of verge are you storing?

My problem is we will be going 'remote' for a minimum 6 weeks and want to extend the fresh produce as long as possible before switching to dehydrated and canned. Removing/ storing rubbish is also a big factor on this trip and we can't burn, bash or bury.

Cheers

Anthony (W.T.C)
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 889008

Follow Up By: KiwiAngler - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 22:17

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 22:17
Gidday Anthony

veggies, using these bags ( you are correct, the light green ones) have been stored in the fridge - they are designed for fridge storage - can give up to 3 weeks storage
Fridge stored veggies : lettuce, cauliflower, sparrows grass, green beans.


All the others like potatoes, kumara, onions, pumpkin (uncut) i store in a cool dry part of the car or camper- use a couple of those insulated carry bags - seems to do the job - if they start to show signs of deteriorating I cut them up and freeze them.
0
FollowupID: 889009

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 23:15

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 23:15
I tried two brands of those green vegetable storage bags. The vegetables still went mouldy before the control vegetables in brown paper bags. So much for all the fancy science about the storage bags.

Already suggested, the old fashioned idea of newspaper is good - but who buys newspapers these days?
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 889071

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 22:48

Monday, Mar 05, 2018 at 22:48
I have only done 3 weeks max with zero supply top up, no freezer, no premade meals, no dehydration and only a 40L fridge but i have fed a health-conscious family of 4 with fresh food daily.

Longevity varies of course depending on conditions. Driving vibrations bruise food so lots of padding required and choose areas in vehicle with low centre of gravity that remain cool and dark...eg. roller drawers. Use the newspaper method - it works!

I stack fridge with crovac single meal sizes of meat, sliced deli meats, and loads yoghurt cheese etc. I carry tin fruit, and loads of jars of pickled and marinated vegies and gourmet things to spice up the grated raw vegies. Plus loads of raw nuts dried fruits and seeds.

Carry a good grater and use it to prepare raw vegies in salads. Eg raw grated beetroot, carrot, cucumber etc.

Stock up on miso soup paste, cruskits and tin tuna, tin legumes. A few squeezee tubes of aoili, etc

My selection of recommended veg for out of fridge storage is: beetroot, sweet potato, cabbage (red and white), hard avocadoes, firm tomatoes, baby eggplant, baby zucchini, yellow button squash, onions, potatoes, ginger, garlic. However food deteriorates quickly once cut so plan appropriately.

I find Mission brand wraps have months of shelf life. Other brands only weeks.

I have also had success growing sprouts on road...start from seed and once the fresh stuff youve bought is running low the sprouts will be ready ...3 weeks. Mung bean and alfalfa work best.

Hope this helps.
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Classifieds: Australian Historical/Pioneer/Autobiography
Moderator

AnswerID: 617384

Follow Up By: Member Kerry W (WA) - Tuesday, Mar 06, 2018 at 11:34

Tuesday, Mar 06, 2018 at 11:34
Yes agree with Michelle - Sprouts a great option. Keep an eye out for one of these - (I think Woolies or Bunnings may have them) You can keep a steady supply of fresh sprouts daily by filling up a tray every second day
Kerry W (WA)
We have this one life to appreciate the grand design of the universe and for that, I am extremely grateful.
Stephen Hawking 1942 - 2018

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 889020

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 03:58

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2018 at 03:58
Hi Michelle

Thanks for the detailed response, heaps of info in there to consider.

Your list of "good travelling veggie" is pretty much what I normally take. I like the idea of the hard avocados, I'm fortunate enough to get these for free by the box full - smaller sizes or slightly sun burnt but too ugly for the posh city hipsters to eat (personally, I've never tried avocado skin - and once there undressed and smashed they all look the same LOL).

Breakfast and lunches are pretty much sorted (we eat much like you have described). Biggest issue is the evening meals which will need to be a little more substantial.

The sprouts idea may be a goer though - someone else has suggested growing them in an icecream container! I have some time before we leave so may have a crack at it first - I think the 'machine" Kerry has suggested may be a little cumbersome for this trip.

Once again, thanks for the response - I am siting down and digesting (no pun intended) all the information and will write a summary and post it on the thread.

PS - BTW I got the books in the mail - they contain just the info I need for a repair job.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 889043

Popular Content

ExplorOz Shop Suggests (12)