Tyre Deflators that remove valve core

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 09:09
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Hi,
I used the search function but nothing much came up. I am planning to update my deflator as I find what I have is slow and more difficult than necessary. I am not considering the Staun type as I deflate to multiple different pressures and the reconfiguration seems like hard work. Top of my list at the moment is the ARB EZ deflator.
Do any members have experience with the reliability or otherwise of removing and replacing the valve core multiple times using this type of deflator? I am sure they were never engineered for this. I do use a TPMS that seals the valve stem anyway so the core really only functions to inflate and deflate while the TPMS sensor is off.
Thanks, Ron
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Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 09:17

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 09:17
Hi Ron.
Have the ARB for about 7 years now, and it's a gem, easy to deflate 2 or 3 more psi as needed.
I have never had any valve issues.

You can get many copies online, sometimes much cheaper, and I imagine most would work fine . . . ARB EZ is no doubt made in a Chinese factory, probably the same one the others now come from.

I also have a set of Stauns that haven't been used more than a few times before the ez deflator was purchased.

About a year ago I bought a permanent Masten TPMS system, and believe me it is well worth having 2nd valves fitted to your rims, a new one opposite the TPMS ones.
I got short valves fitted so the sensors are well back reducing risk of impact.
Can't imagine dropping and inflating often with one valve and TPMS fitted, would be a real pita.
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Follow Up By: Member - Cuppa - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:30

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:30
I have the ARB version too....... & like it. I tested it's accuracy against my personal standard - a 'certified accurate' Jamec Pem inflator (admittedly now quite a few years old) & both give identical readings. Good enough for me.

Les has reminded me of my intention to get second valves fitted next time the tyres are off. Airing up & down is a pain with valve stem type TPMS sensors.
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Follow Up By: Member - Penski - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:16

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:16
Thanks for the info. I assume the painful part of TPMS is the grub screw on each. I actually removed mine and so far they haven’t been stolen or come loose after 4 years. They’re fitted full time too. I would expect the system to alarm if they came loose as there would be a pressure reading drop. Regardless, I will enquire about second valves for the TPMS.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 12:36

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 12:36
.
I started out with Staun deflators but found I needed various pressures. Switched to an ARB EZ deflator and found it very convenient. Sure, it takes time to go round the four tyres but never in a hurry outback.
Just need to be careful when connecting to the valve stem so as to not cross-thread and damage the stem.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 13:08

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 13:08
Hello again Ron.

The Masden TPMS sensors have a special key (square) to fit behind the sensor to undo, and I could see that besides the time taken to R&R these to change pressures or air up, eventually that either the key or back of sensors could get damaged and be extra hard to do the process.

Having TPMS with grub screws and the grubs removed would be less of an issue for sure, so you might not worry 2nd valves.

I suppose there is less chance of mucking up a sensor thread IF you did get 2nd valves, as Allan says, you need to be aware of straight threading . . . this applies to Stauns too, and even valve caps !!

I always carry a few of each various valves and valve stems (lengths) for mine and other vehicles, just in case someone loses or damages something.
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Follow Up By: Gramps - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:59

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:59
If you have TPMS with grub screws and find them a damn nuisance (as I did)
fit T-valves and be done with it.

ps May not suit those who need instant tyre deflation though :)

Regards
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Follow Up By: Member - Trevor_H - Saturday, Mar 31, 2018 at 22:45

Saturday, Mar 31, 2018 at 22:45
Gone off the track of the thread I know, but I discarded the lock nuts on my Masden TPMS sensors after 1 locked so tight the valve stem turned causing a slow leak.
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Apr 01, 2018 at 08:23

Sunday, Apr 01, 2018 at 08:23
Hi Trev, just for thread info, my Masden don't have lock nuts, but a special key (2 provided, so a spare also available in case you misplace it !!).

The sliver key is kinda [ shaped and wraps around the valve, with a back square spanner shape to fit the notched back under the sensor part.
Easy enough to undo the 3/4 turn and then hand unloosen / retighten, but I wanted to put them on and leave them on to avoid long term issues.
Hence the 2nd valves are perfect.

It is possible to undo with a small spanner I guess, in case an owner was very forgetful :)
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:28

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:28
Had an ARB EZY deflater since they first appeared on the market - never had a problem with it or any of the tyre valves, and it gets plenty of use.
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Follow Up By: Member - Robert1660 - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 20:16

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 20:16
Hi Guys,
Agree with Phil. I also have never had an issue. However, over time the mechanism does become more difficult to operate. To solve this problem I use a small amount of rubber grease which lubricates the device.
A friend of mine did have an issue with one of these deflators. Not sure whether it was an ARB branded device, however the issue was that the claw that engages the valve was too narrow and would not engage the valve. Something to look out for.
Robert
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 21:25

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 21:25
Yes, mine's had a spray of silicone spray before too.
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Reply By: Duncan2H - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:44

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 10:44
I'm not getting any younger.. the crouching down at each tyre (6 of them when the trailer comes along) is a pain in the bum with the ARB type deflators.

Here's $30 worth of parts from the local Total Tools shop.. A dual tyre inflation/deflation hose. Very little bending/crouching.

It's got a clip on chuck for each tyre, a single schrader valve at a nice working height, and a tap to release air. Clip on the two chucks and you can work at a comfortable height to inflate/deflate. The tyres are left balanced in pressure at the end of the exercise.

Commercial versions of these are available for $200 including a fancy gauge which means you cant throw it around like you can with this version. You need to carry a small handheld gauge to periodically check pressure as you inflate/deflate.

With a clip on chuck from your compressor you get hands-free re-inflation of two tyres at once.

Photos: https://photos.app.goo.gl/mCpmyREjNYw8jiNm1
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Follow Up By: Member - Penski - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:01

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:01
Nice idea. What stops the air rushing out the second clip on fitting once the first is fitted?
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Follow Up By: Duncan2H - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:05

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:05
The air does come out the second chuck in the time it takes you to clip the second one on. Its not a great amount. I had considered adding an inline tap but decided it wasnt necessary. You can limit it a little with your thumb.
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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:10

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:10
The day I saw a guy use one on his tyre and it ruined the thread that was it for me. In his case he had already lost the spare. Luck for him, someone had a spare stem that fitted. But it cost about 45 mins.


I got one of these Jamec Pem auto inflator / deflator. It's very quick and fully automatic for inflating or deflating. Individually calibrated to 0.3 PSI too.
Tony
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Follow Up By: ian.g - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:22

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 11:22
If it's not a rude question what do these cost, looks very impressive.
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 12:38

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 12:38
Lots of ebay sellers have them for $239. I have heard of Repco selling them for under $200 when they have specials.

It is simply brilliant. It is extremely accurate and totally automatic for inflating or deflating like those at the servos. No sticks, no bending down, no testing retesting,,,,,You can even set 2 preset pressures or any pressure on demand. I have mine set to 22 PSI and 40 PSI. It even has a tyre reseating mode.

It's deflating is fairly fast. From the time you clip it on the wheel to the time you have the exact right pressure it is the fastest inflator and deflator by far. And you end up with pressures that are exactly the same as your TPMS.

Instructions.
1)Set desired pressure
2)Clip onTyre
3)Relax, walk around and drink beer.
4)Wait for beep
5)Go to next wheel.

It's great to relax when airing up or down instead of concentrating on correct pressures. It is rechargeable with a mini USB but I have never had to recharge it in 2 years.
Tony
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 13:52

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 13:52
How quick is its deflation compared to valve removal?
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:24

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:24
Malcolm there was discussion on this on another forum some time back. 4x4 earth??

Let me put it this way. The air deflation with valve removal is about twice as fastas the Jamec Pem. But the Jamec Pem is quicker if you include the time to check pressure and have a few goes at letting air out, and much quicker if you over deflate with the valve removal, and have to put air back in.

Overall it seemed that there was not much between the 2 ways normally. Certainly a ton faster and accurate than my old Stauns

Tony
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:29

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:29
This is from a while ago, but I seem to recall it takes about a minute to go from 40 to 20 PSI with 33" tyres. Because you can do other things and it gets the pressure spot on every time, the time becomes slightly irrelevant if that makes sense.
Tony
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:35

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:35
Understood
Thanks Tony

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Follow Up By: Member - Penski - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:40

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:40
Hi Tony,

How does it deal with deflation without a compressor attached or can it? I would expect it could deflate slightly too much and want to put a little air back in, like the service station units.
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:55

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 14:55
Excellent question Penski. It needs the inlet to be pressurised, the tyre deflation air comes out of a separate valve. So out of the box it doesn't deflate without the compressor connected to it. However if you block the inlet, it will deflate properly. I have a female Nitto that is blocked off that I use to deflate without connecting the compressor.

Interesting it periodically stops to check the pressure then calculates ime to go as it gets close to the desired pressure. It will stop within aroud 0.5 PSI of your setting so doesn't need to "put more back in"

It's bloody smart.
Tony
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 17:30

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 17:30
"The day I saw a guy use one on his tyre and it ruined the thread that was it for me. In his case he had already lost the spare. ."

Geez, you'd have to be pretty ham fisted and determined to continue at all costs to do that. I can't understand how people cross-thread clean threads. If it doesn't start and run a few turns on with light finger effort, STOP and find out why. It's not rocket science.

Phew! Now I've got that off my chest - I have an ARB-type screw-on deflator with a gauge that's within a PSI of my digital gauge. I have no issues with it. But the lock screws on the TPMS sensors are indeed a PITA. I've often thought of removing the locking collars when out of town but at $88 a pop for sensors, always talk myself back into leaving them on.
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Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 21:38

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 21:38
Oztrail
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Reply By: Member - peter_mcc - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 22:28

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018 at 22:28
I've got a 4wd superstore one which has a highly inaccurate gauge. Whatever you get I'd make sure you regularly check the gauge is accurate. I got stuck for an hour because I thought the tyres were a lot lower than they actually were...
AnswerID: 617879

Reply By: Member - nick b boab - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 07:01

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 07:01
I use an ARB type of deflater for deflating from 40 psi to low -20's etc works just fine ~not real accurate with pressure , not that that matters as it's not the pressure it's the footprint that matters & if you only want to deflate a small amount just use a stick .
Cheers Nickb

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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 07:10

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 07:10
Looks like I'm the odd one out.
I originally bought two sets of Staun deflators over a couple years period.
Painted the top of one set blue and set the pressure to 28psi for off road driving. Painted the second set red and set the pressure to 18psi for sand driving.
When the ARB deflator came on the market I bought one to compare.

Overall, I find the Staun Deflators to be the most practical to use. By the time I have attached the forth deflator, the first one has reached the set pressure. A second tour around the wheels to remove the deflators and screw on the valve caps and I'm away again.They have never let me down.

I find the ARB deflator takes longer and I only use it when another pressure is chosen, (pretty rare) or sometimes to deflate the camper tyres.
Bill


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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 10:01

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 10:01
I had my original Stauns set of 4, 2 set for 26, 2 for 18, but not long into various types of driving realised I might need anything from 28 down to 8, and they were just not going to cut it for practicality.

If you manage with 2 psi settings, your setup would work for you, but Stauns x 2 sets what about about $180 (Supercheap), vs ez type deflators (ARB) is about $60 ?
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 14:44

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 14:44
Hi Les,

Your costs are probably right if buying now.
I paid around $60 for the first set of Stauns when planning an off road trip and about the same around 18 months later for a deset trip. They are still reliable and quick when used as a set of four.
As I mentioned, I also have the Ezi Deflator if required.
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 10:12

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 10:12
My ez-type deflator is not an expensive one, but it works and the gauge is accurate enough for me - within a PSI of my digital gauge, as I mentioned elsewhere in this thread.

My only complaint is that the part that is inside the slider and which turns to screw onto the valve stem gets very stiff to turn and requires a regular shot of silicon spray lubricant, but that doesn't seem to last long.

Is that common to all devices of this type, or have I "got what I paid for" LOL?
AnswerID: 617886

Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 10:56

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 10:56
I've never had the sticky thread issue with the ARB one, but as I mentioned in another post the ARB ones would almost certainly be Chinese made, and most likely all of them come from the one factory with different branding / aesthetic differences.

There could be seconds, picked up by ebay sellers I guess.

Mine is about 7 years old now I guess, working back from when I bought the Ranger, got the deflator not long afterwards.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 11:56

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 11:56
Thanks Les. It's not the thread itself that gets sticky, it's the O rings or whatever inside the assembly that seem to dry out and make turning that screw-on adapter difficult.

Mine came from Kulkyne Kampers.
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Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 12:21

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2018 at 12:21
Hi Ron, another vote for the ARB EZ deflator. I don't have a TPMS, so I can't comment on that, but my ARB EZ deflator has never let me down. It has proven to be very accurate, (within 1 psi). I find Silicone spray to be the best for keeping things lubricated.

Macca.
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