Not sure this new road rule is the brightest of ideas!

Submitted: Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 14:03
ThreadID: 137178 Views:2616 Replies:28 FollowUps:40
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So you are travelling at the speed limit of 110k/hr, on a good road,and then all of a sudden you spot the red and blue flashing lights on the side of the Hwy, immediately you slow up to the required 40k?hr, but hang on the B double behind you was near the doing same speed ,So what the hell is he supposed to do?,Mow everyone down??…..



Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Member - ACD 1 - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 14:31

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 14:31
Apply brakes, use gears to bring the truck to the appropriate speed!

Given they are a "professional driver", this would be well within their skill set- surely! It is also more likely they have seen the lights before the car in front - given their additional height!

It is the law Axle - it's been around for a while now - get over it and move on.

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Anthony

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 15:49

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 15:49
Yep exactly - move on.
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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:20

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:20
Not only are they a "professional", but from their elevated viewpoint, they likely saw the flashing lights well before you did, and started to reduce speed before you were even aware of the need.
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Reply By: RMD - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 15:07

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 15:07
Axle.
I drove coaches for a while and like trucks do, we slow down when a hazard is seen. The police car has flashing lights to enhance the probability drivres with a brain will respond according to common sense and the law.
Drive past the patrol car faster than 40kmh and their dash cam, really good ones they have, records your number plate and speed and location for the forwarding of personal mail to YOU. Wanna go fast past a police car? Think again.
If drivers haven't got sufficient brain function or are on drugs then, yes, you will get mowed down anytime at all, the law doesn't prevent that.
PS
It is a requirement of having a licence that you operate said vehicle in a manner in which you can stop if a hazard becomes evident. The higher vehice will be able to see a situation usually long before a car driver can.
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Reply By: Jackolux - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 15:25

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 15:25
The 40kph was only introduced in Vic last year , it's actually 25kph in SA .
I had to slow to 40kph on 3 times on one trip into Melbourne, it's evident more than half the drivers either don't know or don't care ,
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Reply By: Life Member - Duncan W (WA) - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 15:51

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 15:51
Came into WA this year. Question is, is this all lanes that pass the emergency vehicle or just the closest lane? Not much of an issue on a normal road but a multi lane freeway or highway could cause some confusion and hold-ups.

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Follow Up By: tonysmc - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 16:09

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 16:09
All lanes including cars driving in opposite direction, except if there is a median strip.
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Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 16:57

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 16:57
He hereby it COULD be dangerous at times is . . . how far from the emergency vehicle position’ do you need to be doing 40, and at what distance ?

There was that NSW lady coming into Adelaide on a he SE freeway, and she claimed a police car had pulled a driver over and was 20m from her lane (and yes, it is 25 in SA, and at highway speeds could be dangerous to slow so much fast, particularly in poor visibility etc.

There appears to be no distance in any legislation I have seen referenced, so it’s up to drivers to use common sense.
But will that be the same as the Police officers view ?
And how will other emergency services like SES or CFS (RFS etc) interpret it, or indeed be able to enforce / report blatant disregard for their safe working area.

A big can of worms open to abuse both ways.
Most motorists using sense and rightful courtesy to emergency responders safety would be ok, but if the inevitable situations occur where they were over enthusiastically booked, it is terribly impractical and costly to fight these things.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:45

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:45
The law says flashing red & blue lights.
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:25

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:25
WA Law includes any “Emergency Vehicle” responding to a roadside incident - these include -tow trucks, RAC roadside assistance patrol vehicles, and Main Roads Incident Response Vehicles.

None of these vehicles have “Red and Blues” they have Amber flashers.

And No! - the law does not include Roadworks vehicles at roadworks.

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Anthony
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:57

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:57
Les was referring to NSW, as was I.
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 21:23

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 21:23
Ted and blu flashers here in SA, and include police, ses, fire (metro and volunteer), ambulance, think that’s it.

Edit - red and blue flashers, darn these small phone keyboards.
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 21:34

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 21:34
Off your high horse Shaker!

I was simply clarifying the law in WA - not having a crack at anyone - which is why my post states “WA Law includes...”

At no time did I contradict yourself or Les (who it would appear is referencing South Australia)

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 08:49

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 08:49
There is no “high horse”, I was just alluding to the stupidity of having different rules from State to State, I realise that it is the responsibility of the driver to be aware of current rule changes, but not in another State.
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Follow Up By: KevinE - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 10:22

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 10:22
The default speed limit for road works is 40KMH, unless otherwise signed & already was before this new law came in. So in WA at least, I can't see a problem distinguishing between a tow truck & road works with the new law.

Here in SA there is a push by the police to have the 25KMH limited raised on roads where the speed limits are higher, as they deem it unsafe for traffic to suddenly drop to 25KMH in some situations. Good luck with that though! Trying to get politicians to raise speed limits is never easy.
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:04

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:04
Sorry Kevin, the "default speed limit for roadworks" in WA is NOT 40kmh.

The speed for roadworks is set according to a number of factors including, but not limited to, projected length of the roadworks, the number of vehicles that use the road, location of the roadworks, access points (to from and between) the roadworks etc.

For example - A major highway with a prescribed limit of 110 kmh may only have the speed reduced to 80kmh for the duration of the roadworks. On the other hand, a small side road (normally 50 kmh) may have the speed reduced to 30kmh.

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Reply By: Nacho - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:11

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:11
No problem for the truck...he is higher than you so would have seen it sooner.
Whatever it takes to keep emergency workers safe I say.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:41

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:41
This rule might cause more accidents than it prevents. Especially if you have to slow from 110kph to 25 kph in SA.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-16/sapol-urges-increased-speed-limit-around-emergency-vehicles/9156008
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Reply By: GerryG - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:44

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 19:44
I was driving south from Ballina the other day and saw that two vehicles were parked on the left side of the road. It wasn't until I was quite close that I noticed that the rear vehicle, a dark blue car of some description, had blue and red flashing lights set up, and going, inside the rear tinted window!
The driver, obviously now, an officer of the law, was in the vehicle having just finished with, or about to start, their work on the front vehicle.
The unmarked police car, with what appeared to have rear tinted windows, was giving passing traffic no chance of recognising their official capacity until one passed them!
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Reply By: Member - Scott & Sally - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:09

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:09
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:42

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:42
There's no chance of an accident, the truckies are professional drivers. They'll see the flashing lights a mile back.....just ask the people pulled up for roadworks out near Dubbo not long ago. The truck cleaned up 8 cars and killed two kids, the flashing lights didn't save them. I'd like to see the statistics on how many people get killed by cars and trucks failing to stop at unexpected hold ups, against how many police or ambulance workers get killed by cars driving dangerously past emergency vehicles with flashing lights on the side of the road. From memory, I've heard of far more of the former compared to the latter but I'm happy to be proven wrong.
This law is fine for built up areas, it's a great idea in fact. It's quite stupid in a lot of ways when applied to high speed motorways. The speed difference is too great, 60 or 70 would be more sensible. South Australia is just plain moronic.
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:46

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 20:46
Tell that to the 2 people killed on Moonie Moonie Bridge a couple of weeks ago when a truck went up their clacker.

The driver was 'leaning over to get a cup of coffee" and the traffic had slowed or stopped for congestion at the Gosford off ramp about 2KM ahead. There were 4 cars hit but one completely crushed.

Visibilty was perfect.
Regards Philip A
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Follow Up By: Member - Bigfish - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 09:46

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 09:46
Was there red and blue lights?
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 00:19

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 00:19
Agree Phil. The incidents might be rare but the outcomes can be horrendous. The majority of truckies may be responsible and alert drivers but complacency, fatigue, distraction and drug use aren't rarities in the heavy transport industry. The tow truck driver's flashing amber light didn't help at Mittagong a few years back.
Long story short but we were close to being victims of a semi driver who wasn't paying attention to slowed traffic and flashing brake lights ahead of him when we were going home from work about 15 years ago. I could see his rig bearing down on our little Mazda bubble at a rate of knots in the rear vision and was about to drive up onto the median strip when he got a small break in traffic in the left lane and veered away at the last minute. We and he were lucky because there was no way he was going to pull his truck up in time to avoid ploughing into us. Suffice to say I've seen enough bad driving by professional truck drivers not to have blind faith in their abilities.
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Reply By: mountainman - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 21:06

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 21:06
Its been standard thing in other states
About time ! Considering the fatalities already in other states
one was a tow truck driver and broken down victim on the F3 or was it hume hwy
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Reply By: Gronk - Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 22:07

Thursday, Aug 30, 2018 at 22:07
Apart from emergency vehicles doing their job, what about the hwy patrol on a 110 k/ph freeway that has stopped someone for speeding ? Hardly an emergency situation, but for that everyone has to slow down.
This WILL cause accidents....some people will not know of the new rule, some won't care ....while others that are not paying attention will get caught up in it all..
In the USA, the rule is to drop 20mph off your speed or in multi lane roads, move to the outside lane if possible.....a more sensible approach..
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Reply By: Stevemac - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 03:42

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 03:42
Copper pulled a driver over on the M1 near Hawkesbury River yesterday, presumably for speeding. Lights a-flashing. Just a couple of meters from the near side lane. Everyone whizzing by at 110.
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Follow Up By: KiwiAngler - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 04:30

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 04:30
New law doesnt kick in until September 1st (tomorrow)
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:44

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:44
And then it is a trial for 12 months - not sure if they will actually book people or just warn them during the trial period.
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Reply By: Malcom M - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 06:11

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 06:11
This law was prompted by a tow truck driver who was cleaned up when stopped to help a break down.

Strangely towies and roadside assists are not included...
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 08:41

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 08:41
Apparently they are in Western Australia.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 09:31

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 09:31
good to hear if true.
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Reply By: Member - lyndon NT - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 07:05

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 07:05
A little off topic here. But as mentioned above, unmarked cars. What's the go, you can buy a pair of lights of Ebay etc. I wonder whether you could argue your way out of not stopping for such a vehicle? Anyone here be a bit dubious about stopping for an unmarked car on a remote stretch of highway with lights flashing?
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Reply By: qldcamper - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 07:58

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 07:58
If your stupid enough to get into the safe stopping zone most truckies leave in front of their rig then forget he is there and jump on the brakes, he would be doing the rest of us a favour removing you from the road.
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Follow Up By: batsy - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 08:20

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 08:20
Wow what a hell of a statement to make & publicly..I hope you don't really advocate this type of thing. What happens when a truck or another vehicle closes the gap to you & you have to slow for the red/blue lights ? Hopefully you will re think your reply.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 09:34

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 09:34
I'll assume you haven't had your morning coffee yet.
Stupid statement!
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:48

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:48
Since when do truckies leave a safety stopping zone in front - normally they are welded to your rear bumper.
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Follow Up By: qldcamper - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:54

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:54
Its simple, if there is a truck right behind you for any reason, you dont stop suddenly for any unavoidable reason, im sure the emergency services crew will see your prediciment and let you delay your braking. Use common sense and drive to conditions just like any other situation on the road.
A rather stupid thing to do.
Oh there is a speeding B double behind me, i need to slow down right now or ill get a fine, but it is ok, if i get crushed it wont be my fault and ill save the cost of the fine.
FFS it is just another one of Axle's silly senarios, take it with a grain of salt.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 12:27

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 12:27
" the emergency services crew will see your prediciment and let you delay your braking. "

Really?
Think they might be a bit busy to be caring about your 'predicament'.
Fine in the mail for another idiot who chose not to obey the rules.
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Follow Up By: qldcamper - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 12:42

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 12:42
Ok Malcom,

So you got a fine in the mail, if everyone was busy it must have been from a speed camera mounted in the vehicle right? If it was then surely the camera captured the truck right on your rear bumper pushing you through.

If you think that is is unacceptable to break a road rule to avoid a potentially fatal accident, then who is the idiot?
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 16:39

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 16:39
Front and rear dash cams are becoming almost a must have with such scenarios.
Their footage would certainly assist in fighting something blatantly outside of the laws purpose, or over zealous enforcement.
Show then the footage, tell the relevant authority you will be fighting it and using footage as evidence, 99% of the time it’ll be dropped.
Without it it’s a drivers word against an authorities and hardly a chance of beating an unfair fine.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 00:32

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 00:32
And if "the emergency services crew don't see your predicament and let you delay your braking" then the bloke in front of you who did slow as required may get a big surprise. Never mind, Jesus will save you, or not.
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Reply By: Member - PhilD_NT - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 10:09

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 10:09
I have 2 camera's on the back of our full height van that has a very square & vertical rear and they are at the top edge. One is for distance and the other is a wide angle looking pretty well straight down and a few metres out. It's not unusual to have cars that I can only see in the close in camera. I've also had a couple of trucks so close that the distance camera is looking straight at their face. So close that there's no chance that they could see what is happening in front of me and the actions of the traffic I was following. Now considering that I'll fit a rear dashcam so that if I'm booked for failing to slow to 40/25 I can present video of it being unsafe. You would hope that the Police would take it in to consideration at the time and hopefully take action against the tailgater instead.
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Reply By: Shaker - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:17

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 11:17
Surely it’s high time that we had National Road Rules, how can a driver be expected to be familiar with rules that vary from State to State. I also don’t understand why rule changes & new rules can’t be included with our registration renewals, surely it would be little more than a push of a computer key.
It seems that South Australia have the most onerous school zone rules that must be almost impossible to adhere to as follows:

School zones apply 24 hours a day, 7 days a week throughout the year.

What do they look like?
White zigzag lines are marked on the road, showing you are approaching a school zone. Signs indicate the start and end of school zones.

How do they work?
School zones have a speed limit of 25 km/h at any time when a child is in the zone, including outside of school hours, whenever a child is on the road, footpath, median strip, even if they are on a bike.

A child is any person less than 18 years of age and includes a student of any age wearing school uniform.

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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 22:08

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 22:08
My only reaction to that is "Holy Sheet!"
How do you determine the age of a "kid" walking in a school zone?
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 23:22

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 23:22
Yes, at 3.00 on the morning.
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Follow Up By: OBJ - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 11:57

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 11:57
Same in Canberra ... school zones 24/7.
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 14:03

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 14:03
OBJ - who told you that - totally wrong.

School zones in Canberra apply 8.00am to 4.00PM Monday to Friday. When it is school holidays the signs are covered up. In the pic you can see the hinge that allows the bottom sign to be folded up over the top sign (and then padlocked)

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Reply By: Rangiephil - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 14:35

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 14:35
I always wonder when I am doing 40KMh in a High School zone what sort of teenagers we are raising when they cannot safely cross the road independently.

I have to say I think it is ridiculous to have 40KMh zones at high schools as in NSW as opposed to primary schools.

At our local Terrigal High School, there are always very few students around at the set times. Most appear to be driving by the car park! LOL

In addition there seems to be no attempt to change the drop off zones to side streets. In AFAIR Blaxland in NSW it Goes from 80KMH to 40KMh on the main road from Sydney to the Central West.
Ah well with the new rules they will probably back down once a dozen or so people are killed. Of course the incident which helped to bring this on where a iced up drongo ran over a breath test cop would not have happened in a 40KMh zone. And I have a bridge to sell.
Regards Philip A


Regards Philip A
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 14:56

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 14:56
All the 40kmh limit does in our area is encourage the kids to thread their way through the slow moving traffic to cross the road & ignore the manned school crossings!
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 19:10

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 19:10
The 40kph zone at Blaxland is in a 60kph zone. I don't see a problem with that.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 19:50

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 19:50
No problem at all, as long as it doesn’t encourage jay walking.

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Follow Up By: Gramps - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 08:17

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 08:17
In NSW we have the ridiculous situation of school zones operating during "student free days". What chance do the little darlings have if their teachers and school staff can't be trusted to operate without a 40kmh limit, BUT only on certain days! Obviously they're fair game every other day.

regards
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Reply By: Keith B2 - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 15:02

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 15:02
Just on the school speed limits, a high school not far from me on a six lane highway has a fence either side of the road, a fence in the median strip and an overhead pedestrian bridge. It still has a 40 kph limit and it's one of the busiest arterial roads in Sydney with about 30,000 cars on an average day.
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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 22:05

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 22:05
Typical "one size fits all" approach of politicians ... everything MUST conform!
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Follow Up By: rumpig - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 08:22

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 08:22
Watching the news yesterday and they had a story about people here in Brisbane petitioning to have Ipswich Rd at Annerley / at the The Junction Hotel area changed to a school zone with a 40kph limit. At this point the road is 6 lanes wide, is arguably the main arterial road that takes traffic South out of the city (other then the freeways), and the school they want this done for is down a side street and doesn’t even front Ipswich Rd at all. I have no issue with school zones right outside the schools to help protect the kids, but how far away from the school do we stop having them? The area in question has multiple sets of traffic lights within a few hundred metres to safely cross Ipswich Rd at, so chances are you’d be lucky to be doing 40kph through there at that time of day anyhow. Push the pedestrian button, when it turns green you look right, look left, look again...if it’s safe start walking, it’s not rocket science.
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Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 17:37

Friday, Aug 31, 2018 at 17:37
Axle

To your question, follow the road rules, that is what will be expected of you, and the B-Double driver behind you.

On trucks, I find most truckies professional, courteous and clearly cognisant of the vehicle they are driving - and for good reason, I suspect they also want to make it home to see the family, and not end up a mangled piece of wreckage.

For sure, plenty of rogue drivers out there of all pursuasions, but you only get to control your actions, no-one else’s, there’ll always be someone breaking the rules.

And on distance required to slow down before and after, common sense suggests you slow down with enough time to be at 40klm by the time you pass the emergency vehicle, clearly a B-Double driver might commence that sooner than the ‘bloke’ on a Postie Motorbike.

And distance afterwards? Well commonsense (yep, commonsense) suggests once you are past the emergency vehicle you no longer pose a threat - so resume normal or appropriate speed.

Some might feel challenged by this new rule, others will just get on with it, but if you still have trouble working out how far in advance you should slow down, just put yourself in the emergency workers shoes and ask yourself the question...

As a footnote, just remember whilst it is good driving technique to check your rear-view mirror regularly, it remains the vehicle that is following responsibility to maintain a distance commensurate with the speed being driven that enables the vehicle to respond to unforeseen situations...

Cheers, Baz - The Landy



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Reply By: OBJ - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 12:15

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 12:15
No need to worry Axle. It does not apply to you.

It really only applies to a few of us here, who are not bush lawyers, but who care enough for our emergency services like Police, Firies and Ambos to want to keep them safe from harm and injury and to make sure they get home of a day or night after work.

You apparently travel on the M1/F3 Sydney - Newcastle Motorway on a regular basis. You will therefore be familiar with the two bridges named after Police officers who were killed doing their job. So, as you go racing past flashing lights you might think of their families. I do .. I knew one of them. If you travel south on the M7 there are other reminders of men doing their job who did not get home.

But, you may bve right. We could also do away with 40kph speeds outside schools too. The number of incidents and fatalities involving semi-trailers, B doubles and even road trains running into the back of cars travelling slowly outside schools means this should also be addressed by our lawmakers.

So off you go ... but me .. I will slow down just to make sure nobody gets hurt. No arguments here.
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 13:15

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 13:15
So OBJ, what has your post got to do with the OP by Axle.
" It really only applies to a few of us here " Really ?
"So, as you go racing past flashing lights" He does?
Etc,Etc.
Get of ya horse.
Dave.
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 20:57

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 20:57
The way that I'm going to approach this law is to obey the law, assume everyone around me is going to either not see the emergency service or disobey the law and speed, take a look around me and get out of the way as best I can so I don't hit anyone or be hit by anyone. It's actually pretty damn similar to how I already drive really. Business as usual.
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Reply By: Member - DOZER - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 21:00

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 21:00
Lets look at this from the other perspective, the Gov employs people to uphold the law and respond to emergencies. It is the law that they provide a safe place for their employees to work, and this is their response. Now it is also the law that you leave enough room to emergency brake should an emergency occur. This is a good law. A while back I found myself on the wrong side of the road with oncoming because a pushy was on the road instead of the sidewalk....that's a good example of a bad law.
b4 you bag me out, walk a mile in my shoes, then your a mile away and have my shoes :)

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 22:05

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 22:05
Is there a law that says bicycles have to be on the footpath (sorry, but I’m an Australian) & not on the road? I thought there was an age limit to be able ride on footpaths.
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 22:15

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 22:15
Depends which state you are in.
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Follow Up By: Member - DOZER - Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 22:20

Saturday, Sep 01, 2018 at 22:20
In NSW it was 12 or younger, but I don’t believe that’s the case any more.
b4 you bag me out, walk a mile in my shoes, then your a mile away and have my shoes :)

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Reply By: 9900Eagle - Sunday, Sep 02, 2018 at 17:13

Sunday, Sep 02, 2018 at 17:13
Had a chat to a Qld highway patrol officer at a truck stop and I asked him what he thought of the new 40kph law regarding blue and red disco lights. Now he was about mid 50's so he had been around and he was also from WA. His slant on it was, I see it as unworkable law that can't really be policed.

He just wanted people to use commonsense and as we all know, that's not going to happen.
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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Sunday, Sep 02, 2018 at 18:14

Sunday, Sep 02, 2018 at 18:14
I worked Ambulance NSW.
An incident on the Pacific Hwy just north of Coffs Hbr.
Many flashing lights in attendance in full view of approaching vehicles and in daylight.
One motorist didn't get his brain into gear and clouted the lollypop guy waving a slow sign.
In an instant the lollypop man has brain tissue coming from his nose.
I'm for the the 40kph limit and above all be alert of your surroundings.
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
VKS 737 mobile 0049 selcall 0049

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Reply By: Genny - Saturday, Sep 08, 2018 at 05:09

Saturday, Sep 08, 2018 at 05:09
I call bulls effluent on those who assert professional drivers have the skills and ability to cope with this rule.

Rear end collision after new rule
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Saturday, Sep 08, 2018 at 07:30

Saturday, Sep 08, 2018 at 07:30
Trucks slamming into stationary cars has been a reasonably rare occurence in the past, but still more common than emergency workers being hit doing their job. The new rule does give the trucks more opportunity to run up the back of cars. Perhaps the new rule over time, will train the latest breed of cowboy truck drivers to steady down in general? That would be a good thing. I've noticed a distinct deterioration in truck driving standards over the past decade. The trucks are more powerful and are now driven like they are cars, weaving in and out of traffic and tailgating is very common. This especially applies to empty tippers with dog trailers, those guys are nuts.
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