Dingo Attack on Fraser Island

Submitted: Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 08:41
ThreadID: 138183 Views:1511 Replies:7 FollowUps:9
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Another dingo attack has occurred on Fraser Island.
Read ABC News report here.

A 14 month old child has been dragged from a camper and rescued by his father.
This has raised the bar on previous attacks.
Clearly, island visitors must take considerable care, particularly with children.
It has not yet been expressed how the dingo obtained access to the camper.
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Allan

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Reply By: cruiser 3 - Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 12:06

Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 12:06
I think it’s about time they banned children from Fraser Island.
AnswerID: 625031

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 12:42

Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 12:42
Personally, I think its time to close the island to visitors or at least impose much higher restrictions on visitor numbers and times of year etc. Sadly however, that won't happen and instead they'll kill the dingoes I suspect.
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Follow Up By: rumpig - Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 15:55

Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 15:55
Check how people (especially kids) have been bitten previously, most times it’s due to a lack of supervision.
The six million dollar question here is....how did the dogs get access to the child? My guess is it was sleeping in an annex area with no floor / not fully enclosed....which is not exactly ideal when wild animals are about.
Until the actual full details of what occurred come out, all we can do is guess what happened though
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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 20:38

Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 20:38
Unfortunately, Michelle, I fear you may be correct.
There's reported to be a search ongoing for the "culprit" dogs ... one cannot but wonder how the authorities will determine the guilt (or innocence) of the dogs they locate, and how they'll be absolutely certain that the dogs they kill (as kill some, they almost surely will) were the ones responsible.
Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.

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Reply By: Member - abqaiq - Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 15:48

Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 15:48
Curious how the dingo got hold of a baby, seemingly from inside a camper van or attached tent. More to this than reported, so far!
AnswerID: 625038

Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 18:03

Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 18:03
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The latest report is that it was a camper trailer and the dingo probably gained access by "pushing under the canvas wall". It would then appear that the camper had no integral floor.

A parent less experienced with dingos may well consider that the setup would be adequate. Those more experienced would know that dingos can be more cunning and resourceful.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 18:47

Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 18:47
From an online newspaper report,

"It's understood one dingo was able to pop a clip on the side of the camper trailer, allowing it to sneak into the vehicle through a small gap in the canvas access flap."

What made it want to go into the camper, food smells?
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FollowupID: 898619

Reply By: Michael M34 - Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 18:47

Friday, Apr 19, 2019 at 18:47
While I can sympathise with what the parents (and the baby) are going through, as before, emotions will escalate, the media will go into a feeding frenzy, the local Hervey Bay Politician (if he is still there) will demand the protection of the lucrative tourist industry (oops sorry, I meant the tourists); like before; and order the extermination of the last of the purest strain of Dingo's left in Australia.

Tourist education and regulation is the key but in much more depth than before. I agreed with the Stalag type dingo fencing solely to protect the dingos.

I first took the kids to Fraser the 70's and lost count of the times since but on our last Dingo encounter south of Wathumba at the time of the last cull we found a beautiful dog with an empty .38 cal cartridge (revolver I suspect) nearby. Another inhuman issue.

The Parks guys and women do a great job but lets see what happens with the future political outcome. The election in May wont help the Dingo's either.

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AnswerID: 625040

Reply By: Iza B - Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 06:54

Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 06:54
Appears the camping setup was a Camper Trailer, not a campervan. Entry to such setup by a dog or dingo is quite easy if there is no seal or pegging down of the bottom of the canvas "door". Our hard floor Camp-o-Matic had such a door and was no barrier to our dog.
Anyone who has visited Kings Canyon will have no difficulty with the idea that a dingo will sneak into a tent, camper trailer, or caravan looking for something to scavenge. A small child would smell quite yummy to a dingo looking for something to eat.

Iza
AnswerID: 625044

Reply By: pedro the swift - Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 11:19

Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 11:19
Well, that will make all those who did'nt believe Lindy eat their words.
whats the answer? If they want people to continue to visit Frazer then it needs some sort of separation. Electric fence? Better education for visitors making it clear there is a real risk? A fenced off area just for campers?
They put in a dingo/rabbit fence across part of OZ, why not one across Fraser.
Culling? No,I would not want them to be culled. Rather ban visitors to the island except day trips under supervision by a guide could be a last resort.
AnswerID: 625052

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 12:30

Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 12:30
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Pedro, there are already several fenced camping areas but not everyone chooses to use them.

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Allan

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Follow Up By: splits - Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 15:08

Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 15:08
Culling? No,I would not want them to be culled.
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Neither would I pedro. It was mentioned today on a Sydney talk back radio station that about fifteen have been shot recently and if it does not stop, the island will loose its world heritage listing.
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Follow Up By: rumpig - Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 15:29

Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 15:29
Why the heck would you want to camp there in a cramped in fenced pen area away from the beach, when you can camp on the beach with water views?....been beach camping on the island there with my kids since both were 6 months old (oldest now 16) and never had an issue with the dingos, but we treat them as the wild animal they are and put food and rubbish away and watch our kids like hawks. Personally I think some of the clowns behind the wheel of 4wd’s there are a much bigger danger to my kids then the dingos ever were.
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Follow Up By: Steve in Kakadu - Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 16:23

Saturday, Apr 20, 2019 at 16:23
Pedro,wont be eating my words any time soon.
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Follow Up By: Banjo (WA) - Sunday, Apr 21, 2019 at 09:07

Sunday, Apr 21, 2019 at 09:07
'Personally, I think its time to close the island to visitors or at least impose much higher restrictions on visitor numbers and times of year etc.'

Yeah, but the Ayers Rock 'dingo' was mentioned, so lets close Australia?

Anywhere, anytime someone could be attacked by all sorts of wild things. Or be injured doing all manner of activities.

Why not have people take actions that protect themselves and family rather than call for bans.

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FollowupID: 898654

Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Apr 21, 2019 at 09:53

Sunday, Apr 21, 2019 at 09:53
Kangaroos are just as dangerous as dingoes, particularly the big bucks - these are all wild animals, you don't treat them like pets, you treat them as the unpredictable, wild, and often vicious animals, that they are.

The problem stems from owners of wildlife sanctuaries and tourism ventures, letting tourists pet these types of animals, and lulling people into thinking all wild animals are just big cuddly pets, waiting to be hand fed and patted.

As with croc-feeding, encouraging contact with wild animals should be banned - educate people to treat animals in the wild with respect and extreme wariness.
Feeding of wild animals is the worst thing you can do, let them find their own food, and keep them very wary of humans.

In the old days, the wild animals would turn and run on the sight of a human, knowing full well they would soon be on the receiving end of some flying lead to keep them at bay. Personally, I don't think that's a bad idea.

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 898658

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