Electric 4WD ....... sooner than you think

Submitted: Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 17:49
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Just finished watching a review of a new 4WD electric pick-up being readied for the US, Canada, Mexico market initially, but also coming in RHD for UK, Australia ...

Didn't think I would be impressed for a few years yet, but this thing is awesome.

https://www.caradvice.com.au/749009/rivian-electric-ute-and-suv-planned-for-australia-as-early-as-2022/

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=share&v=QMfxJEfb4lw

Cheers
Jim
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Reply By: OzzieCruiser - Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 17:56

Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 17:56
I believe it is still only a show concept car - while it may go into production I doesn't exist as yet - except for the concept car.
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Reply By: noggins - Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 18:36

Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 18:36
Why is it that when I look at the design of it I always think (Early Australian) Skoda and to keep well away.
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Reply By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 19:27

Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 19:27
Gday
Thats a damn long lead cord 634 km and then you have to rewind it to plug in again
thats like from my place to Wentworth
Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 23:31

Thursday, Jul 04, 2019 at 23:31
.
It's not just the length of the lead Muz. It's also the plug on the charger.
There are already more than 7 different types and you need to hope that the next charging station will suit your type.
And typically, our government will not legislate to require just one type for Australia. Or alternatively that each and every charging station must have plugs to suit each type of vehicle sold in Australia.
If it is left to the individual States it will end up like a fruit pudding.
Just look at the variety of trailer plugs. And I doubt that you would be able to use similar adaptors for EV charging.

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Allan

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Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Friday, Jul 05, 2019 at 07:17

Friday, Jul 05, 2019 at 07:17
Gday Allan
Just imagine the young hooligans waiting for you to leave , and then pulling the plug . That would be worse than a flat tyre
Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Jul 05, 2019 at 18:11

Friday, Jul 05, 2019 at 18:11
Something more to think about with EV's - the constant copper thieves, who would knock off your charger cable, just for the copper content, the instant you turned your back on it!

I believe the Tesla EV's use a charger outlet and connector that is specific only to Tesla.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: OzzieCruiser - Friday, Jul 05, 2019 at 22:35

Friday, Jul 05, 2019 at 22:35
[img]
Tesla on a Generator by [url=https://www.flickr.com/ph[/img]
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Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 08:58

Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 08:58
Gday Ozzi
Is that an electric generator or one of those out of date fossil fuel things ?
Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Candace S. - Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 10:20

Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 10:20
Re the Tesla being recharged by a portable generator... At least give them credit for being prepared! :)
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 10:29

Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 10:29
.
......... and for patience!!! lol
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Allan

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Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 09:19

Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 09:19
At the right price I'd have an electric car for round town use tomorrow...! And I'm sure in time prices will be accessible to most.

Solar panels on the roof, charge vehicle, reduce vehicle operating costs in an instant, who wouldn't do it...?

Cheers, Baz - The Landy

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 10:15

Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 10:15
.
Me too Baz.

I just want a little two-seater to buzz around the village. Maximum 50km at a time. But nobody is manufacturing one. I would have thought that such would be a good entry to the EV market.

Ross Blade was producing the 'Electron' based on a Hyundai Getz but has been put out of business by ESC requirements. Hardly need ESC for a suburban 'shopping trolley'. They sold at $47k. (Blade Does a Runner)

Thought of modifying a small car myself and could probably manage it technically (except for ESC) but was concerned at possible bureaucratic requirements.

If you find one, let me know.
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Allan

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Reply By: Candace S. - Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 10:38

Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 10:38
"Despite claiming to be a little over a year away from production, Rivian says it does not know how much driving range is lost when towing or carrying a heavy load."

Statements like that make me question if they're really a year or so away from production!

"...but Australian utes typically can carry up to 1000kg, which in most cases is more than their larger US counterparts which have suspension that prioritises passenger-car comfort over load-carrying ability."

There are zillions of different packages, configurations, and trim levels of full-size pickups in the US. Even F-150's can be configured to carry more than 1000kg, LOL.

2019 F-150 brochure
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Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 11:46

Saturday, Jul 06, 2019 at 11:46
There's at least four things stopping the full EV revolution arriving overnight.

One is, the enormous demand for lithium batteries, if the majority of vehicles became EV's - which just cannot be met, by current production facilities.
It takes years to plan and build and put into production, giga-factories with the ability to churn out the quantity of batteries needed.

These batteries are complex, require top-level QC, and constant build system tests and checks - and they take extended time to construct.
There's no rapid-fire, 1000-a-minute, mass-production levels for these things.

Two is, there's a need to improve battery energy density. Lithium battery energy density is good enough to start the EV revolution, but they still lag badly in energy density compared to fossil fuels.

Three is, the charging network is not in place. It's bad enough queuing up for petrol on Cheap Mondays, and waiting for 10-15 mins to reach a bowser - but can you imagine the queues when everyone has an EV with a flat battery, and it takes 30-45 mins to recharge it??

It will need service stations to enter into arrangements with shopper carparks, to utilise large available shopper parking areas, to install a charger in each bay.
No current fossil fuel servo will have enough area available to be able to recharge any more than a couple of dozen vehicles.

Yes, you can recharge at home - but that limits your travel movements to a relatively small radius from your home.
Publically-accessible chargers will be needed - everywhere. The idea the English inventor came up with, a charger in every street light pole, has merit.

These charger arrangements will still need addressing as regards planning, cost structures, and installation.
I see nothing currently being done in these areas - this country-wide charging network arrangement will suddenly fall from the sky onto councils and other planning bodies, and companies and retailers - and they will be scurrying to try and adopt the huge changes needed, and determine the costs and cost recoveries.

Four is, hybrids are going to play a very large fill-in role, in the vehicle mix, in the next 10-15 years.
There is no way that full EV's will have the capability to meet long-distance touring, and heavy towing requirements, with current technology.
But the current hybrids are very good, and can only get better.

I can see there will be a huge divide in the vehicle market in 10-15 years - the cities will become the home of EV's, with hardly a fossil-fuel vehicle to be seen, and the country areas will still be home to the "outdated, obsolete" fossil-fuel vehicles, which will still be necessary for most country travel tasks.

By far the greatest hurdle that current EV's must overcome, is the simple economics of current EV offerings.
Paying double to acquire an EV, just to save $1500-2000 a year on fossil-fuel purchases, still makes no sense.

Cheers, Ron.

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Reply By: Batt's - Sunday, Jul 07, 2019 at 03:02

Sunday, Jul 07, 2019 at 03:02
Good to see how future travel is advancing people will be able to use them for weekend camping trips at this stage. But I wonder if you will have the power supply to reinflate 4 tyres and drive home after a day or 2 camping on a beach something else to be concious of or experiment with before heading out.

I'll be there waiting with my diesel and a snatch strap to tow you home for a fee lol sorry couldn't help myself.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Jul 07, 2019 at 13:18

Sunday, Jul 07, 2019 at 13:18
The four-wheel drivers carrying gensets, are going to get a lot more "mates" pretty rapidly, when the EV's arrive in force! [;-)

Cheers, Ron.
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