12V supply for UHF Radio

Submitted: Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:08
ThreadID: 13906 Views:2622 Replies:8 FollowUps:4
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Hey all,
Just about to fit a Uniden UH013 UHF Radio into a '04 TD Prado... and would like to draw on the experience of others on how you've connected the 12v supply?

I've got 2 x 12v cigarette light plugs so can use one of those - but just wondering if anyone has a better way or knows a 'secret squirrel' way of getting the 12v from somewhere else.

Cheers,
Drewsie :-)
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Reply By: steve - Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:14

Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:14
Picked up the power from the rear of the accessory socket on mine. You'll need arms of rubber though.

Steve.
AnswerID: 63834

Follow Up By: steve - Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:16

Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:16
BTW, the radio is mounted inside the console.

Steve.
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FollowupID: 324990

Reply By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:21

Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:21
Buy a length of twin insulated auto wire and run it through to the baterry and put a fuse in the positive lead.
AnswerID: 63837

Follow Up By: Carbon13 - Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:27

Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:27
Not a bad idea... the thought didn't cross my mind to go back through the firewall for power. Did something similar for the air horns *GRIN* HeheHaha - couldn't resist $19.95 twin airhorns from supercheap auto!
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FollowupID: 324992

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Victoria) - Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:34

Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:34
If connecting the negative direct to the battery then fuse it as well as the positive. If the main earth should come adrift then the return will be through the radio earth...not nice if it aint fused.
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FollowupID: 324993

Reply By: Carbon13 - Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:23

Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:23
This unit has a remote head - so will mount the unit itself under one of the seats - so will have to run the 12v to under there too.

I've already pulled out the glove box - but soooooo many wires! Looks like there are a few plastic connector plugs not being used - possibly for accessories for the Grande Model??? Anyway, 'spose a multi-meter will tell me if they're live.
AnswerID: 63838

Reply By: Bilbo - Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:39

Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:39
In my travels as a prospector with my old Mav ute, I developed a sub fuse board for accessory and supplementary wiring feeds. This was an old fuse board out of wrecker Diahatsu. This was wired direct to the battery with high ampage cable - big stuff. The sub board was screwed into in the inner wing panel, under the drivers side wing of the Mav. The sub board takes the regular glass fuses but can suffer from rusty ends on the fuses if you use steel capped fuses and not the hard to find brass capped ones. I used to spray 'em with WD40 stuff often to try and prevent the rust, sometimes used "Fishoilene".

Once the sub board was established, it was just a matter of running any accessory or supplementary wiring back to this fused supply board for 12 volt power. I ran a fridge, a set of spotties (through a relay), an electric fuel transfer pump for a long range sub tank, HF radio, CB radio, all sorts of gear from this set up and each supply was individually fused. There are about 14 seperate fuses on the board and it worked a treat. Only problem was the steel capped fuses occasionally got rusty and had to be rubbed down once in a while.

I remember I had a set up for gear that I needed when the ignition was "Off" (straight off the cranking battery) and another feeder for when the ignition was "On". But I can't remember where took the high amp feed cable from for the former. I think there was a high amp spare wire in the loom very close the cranking battery on a Mav/Nissan. I seem to remember it was yellow cable and looked about 20 amp rating or more. The set up fed just everything I ever needed.

Bilbo
AnswerID: 63841

Reply By: Bilbo - Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:45

Friday, Jun 18, 2004 at 23:45
Whoops make "But I can't remember where took the high amp feed cable from for the former" into "But I can't remember where took the high amp feed cable from for the latter".

BTW - the fuse board was fastened inside the inner wing, in the engine bay and NOT outside over the wheel.

Bilbo
AnswerID: 63842

Reply By: jolls - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 02:43

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 02:43
Drewsie,

I concur with Bilbo. The way to go is to establish a second fuse block for all your accessories. I attached my last set up to the second battery; therefore it was isolated by the solenoid; the down side was that you could potentially leave it on, just became a habit to turn it off whenever I stopped. When I do it next time (currently OS and will be back in Jan) my plan is to pick up the fridge and any other permanently connected bits off the second battery; i.e outlets for lighting etc and have a second bank for the other accessories, HF, UHF etc. You should be able to pick this up at the rear of your original fuse box. An old fuse box out of another vehicle should do the trick, or you could by two five bank fuze holders from an auto sparkie for a couple of dollars.

Hope this helps.

Cheers

Craig
AnswerID: 63852

Follow Up By: Jimbo (WA) - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 23:39

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 23:39
A fine-tune to this great way of doing things is to put the extra fuse block in the cabin rather than under the bonnet. This has all the advantages mentioned by Bilbo and Craig, except you only have to run one set of wires through the firewall (earth and power for your fuse block) instead of a set for each accessory you add on.

Mind you, this is only valid if your accessories are in your cab - like GPS, UHF, phone etc.
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FollowupID: 325116

Reply By: Carbon13 - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 05:07

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 05:07
Thanks guys - much appreciated.

Often wondered what others did when setting up accessories. You often hear of the number of accessories and gadgets people have, but not how the electrics is done!

Cheers :-)
AnswerID: 63853

Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Monday, Jun 21, 2004 at 12:15

Monday, Jun 21, 2004 at 12:15
Run direct to the battery, easy as, get your pocket knife and just slit the gromet that has your wire looms going through it, run a single wire through to the battery, buy a water proof fusing housing from supercheap (blade type) and connect to battery, it'll take you half an hour tops, just earth it to the body. The rig is only 5watts max, it's not a big deal. Your going to have to run a cable throught the firewall for your coax anyway. Just use a dap of silicone to ensure water tight seal on the gromit when you've finished. You don't want the radio turning on and off with accessories either, you want it on all the time.

If you have dual battery you can run some 8 guage through the firewall and setup a disitrbution system to run all of your accessories.
AnswerID: 64185

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