Nanny state in the extreme!!!!!

Submitted: Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 17:21
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Nanny State in the extreme here in Victoria, I just travelled between Stratford and Bairnsdale 45kms of Highway One, some numb nuts in Vicroads has expended millions of dollars and put Armco barrier down the middle of the road preventing overtaking except in the 5 passing lanes, when I saw it I just shook my head in utter disbelief, won't be long before it happens state wide........
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Reply By: Ron N - Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 17:40

Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 17:40
When you see some of the local imbeciles and incompetent tourists sharing the road with you, you have to understand this is the only method the authorities can find to stop these imbeciles overtaking on the crests of hills, or over double white lines, and killing members of your family in the process.

There's just been a bloke sentenced here in W.A. for overtaking a car, over double white lines, on the crest of a hill - and he collided with a woman coming the other way and killed her.
This imbecile survived, as they always seem to do.

But when he was charged with manslaughter, his defence argument was that he didn't do anything inherently dangerous!! - what he did (overtaking over a double white line) was merely a "technical infringement of a road rule!!"

God give me strength!!

Luckily the judge disagreed and sentenced him to jail - but he still only got 12 mths!!
He should've got 12 years and never be allowed to drive again, such is his total imbecility, and lack of understanding of road rules, and safe driving principles.

Driver sentenced for killing woman after overtaking on double white lines

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bigfish - Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 18:26

Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 18:26
Wonder what the sentence would have been if it was the judges wife that was killed...
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Follow Up By: tim_c - Friday, Sep 27, 2019 at 10:43

Friday, Sep 27, 2019 at 10:43
He supposedly didn't do anything dangerous, yet his actions directly caused the death of someone... just what is the definition of dangerous according to these people?

It might be technically a road rule, but why does that road rule exist? Precisely because it is inherently dangerous to overtake when you can't see if someone else is coming the other way.
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Reply By: Dave Trees - Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 18:24

Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 18:24
That stretch of road has a long history of head-on collisions, many of them fatal. I travel it fairly regularly for work, and rarely find myself held up by the lack of overtaking lanes .... when travelling at the posted 100km/hr speed limit.
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Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 18:52

Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 18:52
How would this be a problem John. The ARMCO is were the double white lines were so you could LEGALLY overtake anyway.
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 05:48

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 05:48
The Armco rails are were the double lines were not, where double lines were, no Armco, just double lines.
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Reply By: RMD - Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 19:41

Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 19:41
John
Besides the Armco which is a good idea in many places, the insane socialist government here have installed thousands, many thousands of kilometres of cheese grater barriers in places where there is no need. A mate of mine died after a roo took him off his motorcycle, not unusual, but the cheese grater he hit ended his life then and there. In many places you cannot pull off the road for any reason, very dangerous.
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Reply By: Ozi M - Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 22:38

Tuesday, Sep 24, 2019 at 22:38
In NSW, we are required to pull over and stop if we wish to talk on the phone or reply to a text. This I agree with, no problem but !

On the other hand we have millions of dollars worth of cheese grater fences along a road that has a Huge drop off of 100mm !

Almost impossible to find somewhere to pull over around Newcastle area on the country roads.

So much of the road has these fences that if there is an emergency or a mechanical failure people are forced to stop on a very narrow shoulder.

Their vehicle is so close to the passing traffic it is dangerous, no where to change a tyre or pull over to fix a problem.

Road toll is the same as drownings, there will always be accidents, sad but true, we will never get to zero.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 06:20

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 06:20
Yes, absolutely no chance of getting to zero.
They never seem to take into account (at least publicly) the increase in population and foreign unskilled drivers each year.
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 06:38

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 06:38
The road toll has been dropping in real numbers and as a percentage of population since 1970. In 1970, 3798 people died while in 2018, 1137 people died. In 1970, this represented 30.4 people per 100k of population. The number now is less than 5 per 100k. The breakdown per year is here. They didn't have a column for foreign unskilled drivers so I can't give numbers for that.
The numbers clearly indicate that all road safety measures, including rule changes, infrastructure changes and car design changes, have been spectacularly successful in reducing the number of deaths on our roads.
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 12:05

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 12:05
Malcolm M,

What is the difference between a "foreign unskilled driver" and a home grown unskilled driver?

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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 12:23

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 12:23
Macca

My sons girlfriend moved to Aus about a year ago. She holds a license for her country and only had to sit a practical test to gain her license. Somehow she was not required to do any theory whatsoever. That apparently is quite common for some of the Asian countries
She can't drive for pooh.

That's a "foreign unskilled driver".
The idiot kid who lives next door is a "home grown unskilled driver"

Hope that's cleared that up now :)
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 12:29

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 12:29
Malcom,

No problem, but I still don't see the difference. Unskilled is unskilled wether foreign or home grown.

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Follow Up By: greybeard - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 12:33

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 12:33
The origins of stupidity are not based upon race. Stupid is stupid.
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 14:47

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 14:47
" What is the difference between a "foreign unskilled driver" and a home grown unskilled driver? "


A turban ?
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Follow Up By: eaglefree - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 20:30

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 20:30
Geelong bypass same. Wheel became loose. Traffic 60cm from my van. Passenger side I only allowed 80cm the change the damaged wheel between van and steel wall.
Van shook on the jack everytime a car, truck passed which was every 10 seconds. Next time RACV!! So I have some protection by way of flashing yellow lights.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 00:34

Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 00:34
There is one major and prevalent problem with the "foreign unskilled driver" - who has come from a country where they drive on the right - and the driver has learnt to drive on the right, and has no experience with driving on the left.

That problem is, these drivers from these countries automatically swerve to the right, as part of their ingrained response to road emergencies - just as we, who have been trained to drive on the left, automatically swerve left as part of our ingrained, automatic response to road emergencies.

So, a driver from a foreign country, who learnt to drive on the right, comes to Australia, produces an International Driving Permit - and without any local training or testing, is let loose on our roads.

Not only are these people unused to the high speeds on our often-less-than-national-highway-standard roads - they are also not used to driving for the vast distances that are part of driving in rural and Outback Australia.

Then this "unskilled foreign driver" makes a severe error of judgement (sometimes caused by a severe lack of knowledge of local road rules) by initiating an overtaking manouevre, by crossing double white lines, or before a crest of a hill - and when suddenly faced with an oncoming vehicle in their lane - they instinctively SWERVE RIGHT.

As the oncoming driver is instinctively swerving left, the result is a predictable head-on collision, often with fatalities as a result.

The answer is to ensure that these visitors to our country are brought up to speed, and even given a mandatory driving test, with added instruction, to ensure that they come up to basic Australian driving standards.

I went to Greece a few years ago (and Greece has an appalling road casualty record), and hired cars in various places throughout Greece.
It was "interesting", to say the least, to find Greeks overtaking around blind bends, over the crest of hills, and over double white lines - CONSTANTLY.

In fact, the advice from the hire car people was invariably, "you always drive half in the emergency lane, to allow for the other mad drivers!"

But the best advice came from a hire car bloke on the island of Kos - who asked where we were from - and upon being advised we were Australian - said, "O.K. - there are two things you must get used to here, that is different to Australia".

"One is - you need to give way to vehicles ENTERING a roundabout, the opposite to Australia!" ... and Two is, "There are people from 103 countries visiting Greece right now - and they all use the road rules that apply in THEIR country!!" LOL

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 06:34

Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 06:34
You're spot on with your assessment of Greek drivers Ron :-) It's a scary place to drive. In my opinion the biggest problem when swapping sides is pulling out from T intersections. In Australia the immediate danger is coming from the right so unconsciously you focus your initial attention in that direction and on the lane closest to you. Obviously it's the opposite in LHD countries. I know of several instances off the top of my head, of overseas drivers pulling out from a T intersection and being cleaned up by a car coming from an unexpected position. Before anyone says it, yes, you do check both ways, but in some weird way under some circumstances, a car catches you by surprise because your mind dismissed it as being "friendly" and travelling the same way as you when in fact it's coming straight at you and isn't friendly at all. I've been caught a couple of times but without incident. I've never had the problem of swerving in the wrong direction though, and you do a fair bit of swerving in some countries. :-) But that's just me.
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 08:02

Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 08:02
Same applies to Aussie’s travelling overseas. I have lived & worked in the Middle East, driving on the RHS of the road. I have also driven in the US on several occasions. Only once did I enter a carriageway on the wrong side, but as a passenger with other expat drivers, both Aussie & British, I did not feel safe. All I am saying is that you do not have to be “foreign” to be distracted or be a poor driver. There are just as many if not more home grown foolish drivers, or drivers that do foolish things on our roads than “foreign” drivers.

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Reply By: Member - sparra - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 08:34

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 08:34
Yeah John,I live in Bairnsdale and now refuse to drive on that stretch of road .If I need to go down that way I take the Bengworden-Stratford road. There is hardly room to pull up on the main highway if you break down or have a flat tyre as there are Armco rails on the edges of the road also.??
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 08:38

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 08:38
Sparra, was going to use that way to get to Bairnsdale, but been a while, thought I would use the highway, came home via Bengworden, will never use that stretch of the highway again.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 09:14

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 09:14
.
Well Sparra and John, It is good that you have a choice, eh?
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 09:42

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 09:42
Funny really.
This from the state that had "Suicide Lanes " not too many years ago, and the infamous centre turn or whatever it is called.
To be fair the NSW government has fitted cheese cutters on the Pacific highway in places with bad accident histories but these are getting replaced progressively by expressway.
It is astounding what is being done in the North of the state to improve the Pacific Highway and flood proof it. $400Million or so.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 10:49

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 10:49
Rangiephil,

The "infamous centre turn" is what we all do when turning right. I think you mean the hook turn at maybe five intersections in the city. There used to be signs at those intersections showing the hook turn and the words "No Centre Turn"

The hook turns are there to prevent right-turning vehicles holding up following trams. They are (or were when I lived in Melbourne) only at city intersections where there were tram tracks in both directions on both crossing streets.

Once you know what they are all about and how to do them they're no more difficult that any other driving task in a big CBD. I've done them with my hybrid in tow :-) Raised a few eyebrows, but no big deal, really.
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Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 21:42

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 21:42
But if you are new to Melbourne it can cause problems. I have seen interstate visitors totally confused.

The other Melbourne oddity is the Uturn bays (which I think are a relatively new development) near traffic light intersections.

In NSW you cannot do a Uturn at basically any lights. It's a PITA having to proceed until you find a roundabout or side street.

Of course the tramlines make it butt clenching on a motorcycle on a wet day also.
IMHO Melbourne traffic is also far worse than Sydney. That Northern bypass that ends in Greensborough at a set of lights, and getting onto the SE Freeway at Heidelberg on an afternoon. Not fun.
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Reply By: Geoff K4 - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 14:28

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 14:28
Not as good as a Roundabout being installed on the Calder highway at Hattah in a 110km zone
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 16:53

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 16:53
.
Are you telling me that there is no signed speed reduction on the approaches to this roundabout?

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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 17:35

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 17:35
I would think that it maybe better to wait until it is finished, just maybe they may install some very big yellow flashing lights to warn of a roundabout and a speed reduction. Then again, maybe and think about it would you like a set of traffic lights.

Just sayin.

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 23:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 23:00
No, surely you jest?

It's not a black-spot by any stretch of the imagination. They've put bloody big lights up on it and all!

A roundabout....Really?
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Follow Up By: Geoff K4 - Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 07:59

Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 07:59
From what I've been told a near miss occurred when a foreigner turned from the Wemen road onto the highway, but, on the wrong side of the road as they tend to in the area. Basically it was a T intersection now it will be a massive roundabout. I would have expected some merging lanes and better traffic management as roundabouts are for towns and city traffic management aren't they? Anyway too late to worry, it's halfway completed with traffic light control to protect the workers.
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Reply By: Member - Balvenie Pastoral - Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 11:40

Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 11:40
Hi Guys: In relation to "Cheese Cutters", The wire rope "Safety Barriers" Just wait for a Code Red fire situation.... Google "1969 Lara Fires." ...... 17 motorists died in a grass fire... most had taken "shelter" on the concrete bridge.
Of Course the Nanny State mandarins have all this under control and have, Quote, "In response during major emergencies Traffic Management Plans are created to ensure risks are identified and action taken to treat these risks".
An interesting concept with a fire bearing down on you with a 40 plus degree day and a 50 knot wind, with wire ropes on both sides, not to mention minimal visibility due to smoke.
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