Inskip Point...what is it really like?

Submitted: Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:28
ThreadID: 139235 Views:1811 Replies:10 FollowUps:31
Hi team

One lot of YouTube videos that I never tire of watching are the Inskip Point videos of the continual bogging.

To be honest I have never driven to Inskip Point and are the bogging due to inexperienced drivers?

The number of videos that show the first thing many drivers do is then deflate air from their tyres, after they have been bogged.

Then you will see other vehicles drive straight past with no issues what so ever.

From my sand experience it looks like 10psi should be great, or are there other factors that continually are causing drivers to get caught out?

I would like to hear from others that have driven it and are there any special secrets, or is it just common sense and low pressures.



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Stephen
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:34

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:34
It's only soft and tough for 500 metres and I reckon a lot of people gamble they can get away with higher pressure. The beaches on Fraser aren't that soft like they are in SA, unless its high tide and you're up in the fluffy stuff. It's either inexperience or laziness you're watching.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:38

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:38
Hi Michael

Thanks for your quick reply.

As I said I have never driven it, and from an outsider looking in, my very first thoughts are my favourite pet hates........far too high pressures for sand driving, be in the Simpson Desert or beach driving.

I know a lot of beaches can be very hazardous and can and will catch out the most experienced of drivers.


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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:48

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:48
The other places you can get caught out by tyre pressures on Fraser are Indian Head, Orchid Beach and the Ngkala Rocks bypass. I'm sure there are others but they are the main ones. In general Fraser is a doddle on the beaches.
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Follow Up By: George_M - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 19:35

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 19:35
I was up there for two weeks in July.

The sand was cool and largely damp: every day we saw people getting stuck coming off the beach to the bitumen at Eurong:-)

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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:42

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:42
No problem if treated as soft sand which is what it is...


[gi]169774[/gi}
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:46

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:46
Hi Peter

Thanks, but that points looks very different to all the videos of Inskip Point.

Another thing that points to inexperienced drivers, they all mostly never have MaxTrax, snatch straps or any recovery gear.

Then there are the guys that connect a snatch strap straight to a bull bar .


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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:53

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:53
I don't carry maxtraxs either. Just let some more air out.
If you wander on and off the beach or arrive at high tide you will get sick of getting bogged and less air will take you anywhere.
We simply drove out from this.

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Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:56

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:56
Yes Peter, that is the secret I feel.

Go to YouTube and type in Inskip Point and you can see what I mean.....they do make very interesting watching, and sitting at home watching them gives a insight into the fun they have.


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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:05

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:05
The traditional answer is more power and more speed which simply serves to tear up the country for everyone else, as anyone who has crossed the Simpson will witness.
The OKA is severely power limited so I don't have that option. "Walking" over the sand with low pressures is my solution.

Arriving at the top of Big Red from the west in 2018. No screaming engines, no spinning wheels, no stress. About 1800-2000RPM.
https://youtu.be/hX2bqM8VSZE
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Follow Up By: Hoyks - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 19:16

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 19:16
... or they have MaxTrax, snatch straps and recovery gear, but no idea how to use it.

I spent a week there, used the tyre gauge to go straight to 12-15 psi on day one and had 0* issues.

I'd done a fair few trips to Stockton, so had a bit of experience on soft sand and what worked for my vehicle.
Mack in the day you'd see similar scenes on Lavis Lane, it would get dry and chopped up a bit. One car would try it with tyres a bit too high, he'd get stuck, the guy behind him would lose momentum and go down and before you know it there is a conga line of bogged vehicles.

*OK, I did have a big moment when chasing a bus around the southern point and racing the tide to the ferry. On the wet sand and hit a really soft bit and just made it through (bus went a lot deeper than I did).

My own fault, I knew it was a bit sketchy going that way and getting to the ferry 15 minutes later wouldn't have killed me.
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Follow Up By: gke - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 08:24

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 08:24
That is the entrance to Teawah, not Inskip. :)
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:06

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:06
And for those that are not quite sure what I have asked, have a look at this video, and show just what some driver are like....

Bogged at Inskip Point
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:14

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:14
Serious injury or death moments away.
The solution is lower pressures, not wheel spin, not more power, not more speed, not maxtrax.
It is not rocket science.
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Peter
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Follow Up By: RMD - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:34

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:34
While Traction does start with T, so too does Testosterone. Maybe too much of the one and not enough of the other. I was sure the remapped engine with high torque would claim victory, didn't you?

Is that Inskip point or Inbred Point?
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Reply By: Mikee5 - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:25

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:25
Hi Stephen,
I am a sort of local, living in Hervey Bay now and have been going to Fraser Island since the 70's.
Inskip Point is hot soft dry sand. Usually deep due to being churned up by knobs. Tyre pressures are critical, 16 usually works well, 40 does not. I saw one comment on the Facebook page 'another gathering of the 50psi club'.
There is another clip of a guy idling through on no revs, he gets out and walks alongside. Momentum helps but no need to charge.
I have crossed the Simpson and it is not much different, I used 18 psi for most of that. Once onto Fraser you can drive the beach at 80kph (speed limit) and that will heat soft tyres hence the reluctance of some to deflate for such a short distance.
Mike.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:10

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:10
Thanks fo that Mikee

After watching many videos, there are so many people that deflate after being bogged.

There are also a couple of clips where guys are only using 2WD


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Reply By: Gusthebus - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:34

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:34
Having driven it, you are correct. Common sense and low pressure. The ability to self recover should be a priority for anyone with a license. We had a heavy (dont ask) patrol no trailer and had no hassle. As stated slow and steady and don't flog your pride and joy/home/transport/investment in fun. The vids are a good reminder that some lack essential knowledge.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:12

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:12
Hi Gus, so true.

There is even one video of one guy going to the aid of a bogged vehicle and boat, only to rev the hell out of his vehicle and the result was he blew his motor.


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Reply By: rumpig - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:56

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:56
Just spent 10 days on Fraser a few weeks ago, Inskip Point like any sand driving is purely about tyre pressures....i have towed several different of our caravans and camper trailers through there over many years of visiting Fraser Island, and the only time I have gotten bogged at Inskip was several years ago because I had reinflated my tyres some on the island for the 2 weeks we were there, and then forgot to lower them again for getting off the barge to cross Inskip...i stopped before burying the vehicle, a quick deflation of tyres some more and a pair of Maxtrax under the rear wheels of the 4wd and out I drove.
Towing our current 17ft Jayce Expanda van through there I run 14psi rear and 12psi front tyre pressures on the Cruiser, van goes down to 12psi alround also....we time our run for 2 hours before lowtide usually, could probably do it at 16psi alround but i'd would rather reinflated the tyres a touch once on the hard sand around Hook Point, then spend an hour trying to get unbogged. Inskip itself was easy this year as the barge operators had watered the track for the school holiday crowds, but the immediate section you drove off of the barge onto Fraser was chewed up some and still very soft, made me glad I went that bit lower in pressure.



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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:17

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:17
Hi Rumpig

I bet you had a fantastic time over on Fraser, and saw some very interesting things.

Judging by the videos, tyre pressures seem to be the answer and as I have seen, many people towing caravans, trailers and big boats seem to sail through with no problems.

Having said that there are many videos showing idiots passing the slower vehicles, then get bogged themselves.

Glad you had a great time over there.



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Follow Up By: rumpig - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:29

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:29
Yeah we had a fantastic time there Stephen.... the weather was super kind to us and we went places away from the crowds that flock to the usual popular locations. This year amongst other places we visited an old logging camp not many visitors to the island would go to and an old hut that's on the Western side of the island, there wasn't much left of the hut, but some wandering through the scrub exploring had us finding several tank tracked type vehicles that were hidden amongst the trees and slowly decaying away.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:40

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:40
That would have been fantastic.

Was it very windy at this time of the year? as I know down here in South Australia we have had some windy weather, that takes the shine off of what what be a great day.

I have only been over to Fraser twice, both times on one of those big tourist buses, and back then, I thought it would be a top spot to spend a few weeks exploring.


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Follow Up By: rumpig - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:58

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:58
It wasn't overly windy there Stephen, a nice cooling breeze was blowing most of yhe time we were there, but a few nights were quite cool with the breeze blowing a touch more then we would have liked, but you wouldn't call it bad as such...main issue was we didn't expect it to be as cool as it got a few nights (born and bred Qld temperature...lol), we took little in the way of warm clothes wiith us, a bigger jacket would of been nice over the thin jumper I had....Southerners would have been in a t shirt though...lol.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 17:02

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 17:02
That sound like me going away, getting caught out with the wrong clothing, then having Fiona on my back, say.....I told you so......lol

Thanks again


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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:40

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:40
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Hi Stephen,

Fraser sand is much the same order as the Simpson. We take the Troopy at 18psi on both. However on Fraser we are a bit lighter.... with less food and water and no need for 270 litres of diesel.

Probably the worst part is at Inskip between the bitumen and the barge. Although we once traversed that in two-wheel drive as I forgot to lock the hubs, doh! But it was heavy going. Certainly, if you can get across that section, the rest of Fraser is no problem although Indian Head can be heavy-going sometimes.

Yes, I have seen that video (and others) and that can be a frequent scene at Inskip. I have helped a few across there and most were very reluctant to drop tyre pressure. I believe that they had not before heard of the concept.

I cut my teeth on Fraser in 1984 in a little Subaru pulling a camper trailer without getting bogged. But we did not tackle Indian Head then.

What can be more difficult these days on Fraser is the inland tracks. These tracks have been eroded allegedly by 4WD busses. Vehicles with lower clearance can get hung-up. Not an impassable problem with the Troopy but not very comfortable either. The problem has been exacerbated by several drought years where there has been little sustained heavy rain to wash the sand back into the eroded wheel ruts.

One zone that can present a problem is from where the barge arrives at Hook Point for about 10k up the beach. The beach is fairly narrow here and if the tide is up a bit you are forced to the soft part which is littered with flotsam. A few years back we were hastening off the island escaping an approaching cyclone and racing a rising tide. Roz was driving and as we came around the corner we were facing sand only about 5 metres wide and waves breaking against it. I yelled at Roz "don't stop, keep it moving" and like the trouper she is, she got us through OK, but my heart was in my mouth. So it may be wise to avoid cyclones and unusually high tides!

So, are you planning a Fraser trip? If so, we need to talk, right?


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Allan

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:50

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:50
.
Something I should have added above is that as soon as you get onto the hard-sand beach you will want to drive at the 80kph limit. But you will not want to do that at 10psi, so unless you enjoy playing with the compressor it would be best to stick to 18psi from the start. If you are pulling the Ultimate you may want 15psi.

I never get to drive up the beach. Roz grabs the wheel leaving the barge, winds the window down for the breeze to blow her hair and Wheee.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:55

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:55
Hi Allan

I was waiting for your reply, as I know it is right on your back door.

Yes we would live to spend some time over there, but not for another year or so.

When you see the videos, it made me wonder is Inskip Point really that bad, or just people not wanting to drop tyre pressures and being prepared.

I am well aware that any beach driving depends on the tides and can turn a good trip into pure hell if you are on the wrong side of a tide.

Thanks for your reply.

Regards to Roz as well.



Cheers



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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:58

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 16:58
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Stephen, are you home now? Up for a chat? I have private news for you.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 17:03

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 17:03
Will give you a call now
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 17:45

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 17:45
"Vehicles with lower clearance can get hung-up."

We did not need to do anything but watch and wait :)
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Peter
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 18:58

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 18:58
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Hi Peter,

Yes, that's what I mean. Although that track is not so rutted as some. Still too much for a passenger car, even if 4WD.

Mind you, We took a little Subaru 4WD over there in 1984 and pulled a lightweight camper trailer all over the place, but not above Indian Head. Did struggle on one of the by-passes but got clear. Mind you, the tracks were not bad then. In fact, there were no big 4WD busses at that time.... they were using trucks with bench seats on the tray and canvas above!

Actually, that Subaru was pretty good on sand. So light that it just tip-toed over it. But the clearance was the killer, even when the suspension was wound right up.
When you sit there rocking from side to side on the diffs you know you have a problem.
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Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 08:08

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 08:08
Hi Stephen,

I am one who has got bogged at Inskip Point. Coming from the Bitumen on to the sand, 76 Series Landcruiser towing a Kimberley Kamper, following another vehicle in deep ruts, he got stuck, and I could not climb out of the ruts to pass him, the draw bar dug in and acted like a plot bogging me down. My tyre pressures were too high at 22 psi, I deflated to 18, but still could not climb out of the ruts. A guy in a Hilux offered to help, he tried to pull me out but was bogging himself in. I ended up connecting my winch to his rear tow point & winched myself out of the ruts, once up on “virgin” sand, & at 18 psi, I had no further trouble.

Macca.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 08:24

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 08:24
Hi Macca

Thanks for the reply.

What happened to you also looks a very common thing, when someone gets caught out and then causing a chain effect.

Are you able to sit back and wait for the vehicle in front to get through, or are there lots of vehicles and ar3 compelled to go regardless.



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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Monday, Oct 28, 2019 at 08:22

Monday, Oct 28, 2019 at 08:22
Stephen, one of the problems at Inskip is the fact that once you leave the bitumen, there are only two narrow entrances to the sand. Generally, the one on the left is for entering the beach, and the one on the right for departing the beach. These tracks are pretty narrow, with little or no room to pass another vehicle, if one gets bogged in this narrow section. As others have said, the sand gets very soft & fluffy, and it is generally in the first 200 - 300 meters that people seem to come to grief. I have been to Fraser Island twice, and I got bogged the second time as I was towing the camper. If I was doing it again, with or without a camper/trailer/caravan, I would sit back & wait until I had a good space between me and the person in front, so that in the event the other person did get bogged in this section, I was not directly behind them with nowhere to go. As stated, lower tyre pressures are the way to go, and with you towing an Ultimate, you can afford to run pretty low to get through this area. Once onto Fraser Island, you need to find somewhere safe where yo can “air up” a little, as you can quite easily sit at 70 or 80 kph driving along the beach.

Macca.
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Reply By: Member - Ross N (NSW) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 17:04

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 17:04
Watching the videos and reading the mostly sensible comments it appears no one carries a shovel.
Ross
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Follow Up By: rumpig - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 17:41

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 17:41
Can't comment for others, but my long handled shovel is attached to the drivers side of my roof rack....deflating tyres appropriately means it doesn't get used in anger to unbpg my vehicle at Inskip though.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 17:42

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 17:42
Hi Ross

There are so many people that are totally ill prepared for the sand, and from what I have seen, tyre pressures seems to be no 1
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 21:03

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 21:03
I carry a long handled shovel on the roof of the OKA.
I try not to use it except for burying toilet waste. :)
Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Ross N (NSW) - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 14:02

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 14:02
Once bogged as many in the video became, the drivers in my view should not only lower
Pressures, if not already done so, but should also remove the dammed up sand in front
Of the tyres with said shovel. Then snatch if necessary.
Ross
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Reply By: Member - nickb "boab" - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 21:31

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 21:31
we were there a few years ago But did not drive on that section of the beach .
just walking on it was thirsty work ...lol ))) I too have had many hours watching funny youtube moments from inskip . As mentioned the ruts are large & would be dragging on your everyday 4wd , aswel this is a very high traffic area inc towing & trucks recovering brake downs & a wide variety driving skill or lack of lol )) . we did drive on the beach just back up the road with no problems , no different to say Goolwa beach But inskip is a headland type beach as i remember & that might make it more difficult ?? great location .
Cheers Nick b
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 21:59

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 21:59
Thanks Nick.
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