HEATING

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 18:37
ThreadID: 14257 Views:1511 Replies:18 FollowUps:5
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I was wondering what form of heating was used by fellow formulites in their camper, caravan, tent in the times when you would go away in winter or whether you didn't use anything other than your partners body heat.

Baz.
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Reply By: Magnus - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 19:00

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 19:00
Baz

Use thermostatic control 2 stage Electric heater(1220 or 2400 watt) in the Camper Annex and Electric Blanket in bed if on powered site. Also have been known to leave heater running all night suspended from the bows in the tent.

All appliances on earth leakage cord of course.

Gas heater if not on powered site in the annex or perhaps two. No heater running on gas when in bed. Too dangerous. Plenty of material under the bed to keep cold out and good quality zip together sleeping bags. Thermal underwear and good thick socks in bed to keep feet warm.

Have slept in tent in below zero without power and survived OK.

Cheers

Magnus
AnswerID: 65822

Reply By: Sparkie - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 19:32

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 19:32
I personally would use my credit card. It has been swiped so much it wont hurt to swipe it once more and find a motel room(if it is really cold and you have little ones).
AnswerID: 65828

Reply By: Member - Roachie SA- Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 19:42

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 19:42
Baz,

Stick with the "body heat" idea......MUCH cheaper and more fun.....(oh well, as far I can remember it was more fun, anyway!!! LOL)

AnswerID: 65829

Reply By: Mad Dog (Victoria) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 19:51

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 19:51
Nothing worse than being cold when trying to get a good nights sleep so I always throw a hot water bottle ot two in the kit. They can be handy for tucking up the jumper or down the pants when it's brass monkey weather.
AnswerID: 65834

Reply By: Member - Ken - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 20:02

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 20:02
Evening Baz

Use a 1500W thermostatic controlled ceramic anti tilt heater when on powered sites, that is connected through a multi timer when sleeping that cycles 15mins on and 30 mins off during sleep period.

Also use a feather doona. The most valuable item in cold weather.

This by the way is in a Troopy poptop camper. Never have a problem with the cold now.

Ken Robinson
AnswerID: 65836

Reply By: Lone Wolf - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 20:31

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 20:31
Tracy & I bought a small Gas Heater, but we don't use it.

We simply rug up to the max.

If I am following the Sled Dog Circuit in one of the forests, I will wear....

Jocks
Long Johns ( Cotton )
Cargo's
Over Pants
Tee Shirt
Shirt
Jumper
North Face Jacket
2 Pair Sock
Hiking Boots
Full Face Balaclava
Beanie
Gloves

This allows me to set up hides along the tracks and sit in puddles for up to 2 hours at a time with my cameras, and I am not cold.

Just rug up, it's way easier than trying to heat an area.

Cheers

Wolfie
AnswerID: 65842

Reply By: Baz (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 21:00

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 21:00
You must be that Yowie that people reckon they see, with all that gear on must look 4 times your normal size lol.

Baz.
AnswerID: 65848

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 21:08

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 21:08
Bigger.......yes.......but not unmanageable......

When I set up a hide, I am quite often left laying literally in pools of mud, for maybe 2 hours.

It is VERY warm and VERY comfortable.

When I get home say Sunday nite, I undress, and I find that I have sweated nearly the whole weekend, clothes are quite damp and smelly.

Wouldn't recommend this if you were active, but photography in the forest is quite sedentry.

I have spent a lot of time on some of the US websites, about keeping warm, and they all say..........rug up

cheers

Wolfie
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FollowupID: 326738

Reply By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 21:24

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 21:24
Baz,

Just the feather/down doonah for the night and have been too warm sometimes, though not if you get cold before you get into bed. Take longs if I need to as well. Thermals, top and long johns in polypropoline and fibrepile tops too, short and long sleeve.

You may wonder the polypropoline but I have used that in preference to a wetsuit in all but the colder waters in white water kayaking. Yes you get wet when you fall in but you dry out quickly too, all water is shed to the outer layers of clothing, perspiration too. I have worn it at night but too warm to wear long. Socks in bed if I am cold when I get there. Another thing on these synthetics they don't take much to dry them after washing either. Heather bought Travel Towels before the last trip too, take less room and very effective.

Was talking to Queenslander who was using an electric blanket through his inverter travelling through South Aussie where I had the side door open.

You could gather I don't go much on heaters in tents Baz........... I grew up with a school with chicken wire windows and drop the blinds if blowing a gale and rain from the wrong direction.
Cheers,
Who?
John

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AnswerID: 65853

Reply By: brian - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 21:51

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 21:51
two bad women better than all the above,one each side
AnswerID: 65864

Reply By: Member - Bob et Joëlle (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 22:29

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 22:29
We were wondering if the Cobb was OK in the camper - saw somewhere that it is one of the uses ?
AnswerID: 65877

Follow Up By: oddy - Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 22:40

Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 22:40
careful of the fumes
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FollowupID: 327064

Reply By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 22:40

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 22:40
Double sleeping bag with a hot blooded partner is the best, have used petrol light in tent plenty of times to take chill off the air, and if real bad put gas heater on.
Father in law who travels half the year, never in c/parks, with small offroad c/van, puts a video on and elecrtric blanket from inverter and lays in bed to watch movie!
Puts gas stove on in van to heat van, only takes minutes.
AnswerID: 65879

Reply By: Tim - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 22:46

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 22:46
Does the good old bundy bear count?

Tim
AnswerID: 65880

Reply By: Member - Jiarna (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 23:12

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2004 at 23:12
Good quality sleeping bags and good quality wife is all I use for warmth. Never been cold yet (except when I get kicked out for saying something I shouldn't have!!).

Of course, this comes from a bloke who doesn't own a jumper or jacket, just a Drizabone for the cold weather.

Cheers
John
Those who say something cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it.

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AnswerID: 65886

Reply By: Baz (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 07:45

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 07:45
So many differant answers thanks guys, Eildon is going to be cold as, still should be fun, winter is the best time to travel less crowds, hate crowds.

Baz.
AnswerID: 65903

Reply By: Troopy Travellers (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 08:38

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 08:38
It was -4 at Wollondilly River so was very cold for a trial camp after many years of soft living.

I agree with most of the above, Down doonas or sleeping bags, thermal long johns and tops, natural fibre jumper, beanie, scarves and gloves.

An extra wam body helps as long as it doesnt keep getting up and down all night and coming back cold and telling you the @#!!# temperature.

I was amused recently when sitting by the early fire having a coffee there was no sign of the kids at the camp next door, I was later to find out they were in the car with the airconditioning on.

The warmest fibre I know is "Samoyed Dog Hair". If you know someone who has one get them to save the brushings (clippings contain too many spikey guard hairs) for you when the dog sheds in summer. Then get it spun up into "wool" and made into a beanie or socks, I have a vest as well and mostly I am too hot in it. It can be mixed into mohair and/or sheeps wool. It seems to trap the air in and in very cold weather the pile stands up about 2 or 3 cm. It can be dyed successfully also.

Carolyn
AnswerID: 65908

Follow Up By: Wizard1 - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 11:11

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 11:11
I will be travelling south in Sep. We find 16 degress cold up here. Thank heaven for Honda generators and reverse cycle aircon in carvans.

Wizard
Darwin NT

"I will never be cold again"
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FollowupID: 326782

Reply By: Willem - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 10:41

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 10:41
It was -6 in the Simpson some years back. Definitely a 6 or an 8 dog night. We had camp beds then. Lined them with newspaper under the sleeping bags. Was still too cold. Dug a trench under each bed and filled it with coles from the fire. Then we slept well.

To keep warm at night out bush:

Have a 0 or minus rated sleeping bag
Sleep under cover
Sleep alone
Go to bed fully clothed wearing woollen garments
Wear a beanie or balaclava

alternatively:

Go the closest outback community and hire 6 camp dogs for the night.......they will keep you warm and up to scratch....hahahahaha
AnswerID: 65925

Reply By: hardingprj - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 13:56

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 13:56
Heating is a problem for us too. We have a 5 month old what to do. Anybody have some thoughts on how to keep the baby warm if the hubby can't sleep with the baby in bed. Yes, yes kick him out but any other thoughts? We will be in a camper trailer, a tent 22 ounce thickness. Condensation is this a problem?
AnswerID: 65956

Follow Up By: time waster - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 20:06

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 20:06
We have a 4 month old girl and we went to Melrose in sa a month ago (she would have been 3 months then) and I reckon it got to below zero,we had a powered site and ran the fan heater until we hit the sack then we found the best way was to put a hot water bottle in a blanket and place under the camper cot (porta cot) between the ground and the mattres this seemed to stop the cold from rising.

Ohh and one for us too.

We have a off road camper trailer with the thick canvas,we did not find condensatin a problem.
Start early its great fun.

We also have a gas heater but only use if unpowered but must be very careful of oxygen usage in inclosed tent
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FollowupID: 326854

Follow Up By: hardingprj - Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 23:41

Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 23:41
Thanks TIME WASTER waster sounds good. Will buy hot water bottles tomorrow. Hubby left work today, taking a career break for 5 yrs to look after the kids. Before I go back to work from MAT leave we are heading off around Australia. Heading West from Victoria. MMMM the cold is the only thing that is really worrying me.
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FollowupID: 327076

Reply By: Squid - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 20:19

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 20:19
Baz,

Plenty of good quality Port, only for heating purposes of course, prior to entering the double swag. Hot water bottles, 2 sleeping bags zipped open, one on the bottom, insulating you from cold ground, one on top, partner close by, beanie on. Beautiful!

The only problem is SWMBO is not keen on camping in the colder months so I have to consume more port for safety reasons. Will be heading out this weekend to practice the above.

Cheers
AnswerID: 66030

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