When to get an Electrician

Submitted: Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 14:21
ThreadID: 142875 Views:2018 Replies:8 FollowUps:47
I know when ANY electrical work is required, it must be carried out by a registered electrician.
This can be as simple as replacing a plug on a 240v extension lead.
But, it would be interesting to hear how many people are prepared to fork out $100 + for an electrician to replace the plug or socket for you.
Now, I will get comments like, do you know which wire is Active or Neutral and do you know which terminal to connect to on the plug or socket.
I have forked out $150 for an electrician to reinstall the 7 pin plug on my caravan, which got ripped out when I forgot to unplug it when unhitching the caravan. and that is only 12v which is not going to kill you like 240v could do.
I'm sure there will be some interesting comments.
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:12

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:12
You don't need to be a "registered" or "licensed" electrician to work on 12 volt systems. You could have fixed the plug yourself 100% legally. If you follow the standard colour coding and pin diagrams you can't go wrong - unless someone has stuffed up elsewhere. A quick check of the lights when you finished would tell you if you got it right or not.

You are quite right about the 240v stuff.
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Follow Up By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:28

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:28
Colour coding does not always work. I was more worried about the caravan brake connection. I seemed to have one extra wire which had to pair up with one of the other wires.
I did not want to risk burning out wires or the car computer system.
So I forked out The $150 for an auto electrician to come out and fix it. Cheers
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 20:32

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 20:32
Fair enough, George. DIY is easy when everything seems as if it will fall into place. Once you get a curved ball and are not confident in sorting it yourself, then it's time to call for help.

Things are not always as simple as they look. I think you did the right thing in the circumstances.

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Follow Up By: Member - PhilD_NT - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 14:35

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 14:35
" If you follow the standard colour coding and pin diagrams you can't go wrong - unless someone has stuffed up elsewhere".

It's all fine and well when competent people do the wiring, unfortunately though Installers don't seem to be trained well, if at all.

Not long ago I was chasing a high mounted brake light issue on our cars twin cab canopy. The installer took the easy way out of not going to the proper connection in a difficult location. They took the wiring to up under the dash but the trouble was that in the entire length there were 3 changes of colour and the connecting points were buried in protective tubing. The wires at the light itself were different to where they exited the canopy rear hatch and then back inside the canopy shell, then changed again after they exited the canopy to a hidden joint under the vehicle cab. Where they picked up power under the dash was very amateurish. Unfortunately I have to say I got burnt again later on as the installers business was the only one in that location licenced to install my GVM upgrade kit and that was a botched effort as well.

I was trained in low DC volt work and had test lamp, multimeter and a wire tracer but it still took an unnecessarily long time to find it all. The canopy manufacturer's wiring diagram was difficult to follow but was ignored anyway.

Sadly, our caravan displayed similar lack of training in its wiring but few, if any, van Manufacturer's provide even a basic wiring diagram to owners. From various discussions on Forums it seems that even how fridges are wired for 12V power can vary, even within the same Manufacturer.

When negotiating buying our van I overheard one end of a phone discussion between the Salesman and their workshop regarding a motorhome fault. There was a lot of buck passing going on between the base vehicle Manufacturer, the conversion facility and the Dealer workshop of a 12V issue. What hope does a buyer have with either self, or remote auto electricians, to fix issues.
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 14:48

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 14:48
Hi PhilD,

With regard to your comment on caravan manufacturers not providing a wiring diagram for the 12 volt connection to the car, the chart that I posted was the chart provided by them.

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Follow Up By: Member - PhilD_NT - Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 01:37

Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 01:37
Macca, You were lucky to get even that.

My comment wasn't specifically to the trailer plug wiring but to the whole van wiring. Car Manufacturers have far greater regulation and mostly there are workshop manuals available, some at outrageous cost with 3 thousand pages in 3-4 volumes, or the aftermarket ones. A caravan one should be simple enough, especially with production line manufacturing and being CAD designed.

I'm part way through changes to ours with a Lithium conversion and relocating a lot of the associated components and it's time for me to make up a set of documentation circuitry wise. What I can't do though is document where in the walls or roof they have routed the wiring, especially for the 240V stuff. That will remain a mystery, but shouldn't be.

When I wired up the car for the Anderson Plug and connection for the van ESC it was based on what little I was able to get from the Manufacturer and the Dealer. On picking up the van interstate it turned out that the info provided was wrong for the ESC but the Dealer provided no help from their onsite workshop and just said to go to an Auto Electrician and get them to fix it and come back. We took the van to the Caravan Park not too far away and I did it myself. Made use of some of the tools my wife wonders why I take them. A couple of other issues got taken care of as well, both poor workmanship.
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 07:02

Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 07:02
I will have to check my paperwork Phil, but I am pretty sure I have a wiring diagram for the van as well. Of course, it may not be accurate, I have seen house wiring diagrams that are not accurate, so a caravan may also be the same.

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Reply By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:35

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:35
George

Just a couple of quick questions, if you don’t mind.

Are you colour blind?

Can you clearly read simple instructions?


And for the record, you do not need a qualified Auto Electrician to wire up a simple 7 pin plug for your car or van.

As for the $150 that you were charged, the guy must have been Ned Kelly and said to himself, here comes another sucker.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:51

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:51
George did say above that he paid for the auto electrician to come out so may have paid for a service call including travel in that $150
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 16:00

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 16:00
"As for the $150 that you were charged, the guy must have been Ned Kelly and said to himself, here comes another sucker."

For a lot of tradesmen, that is just their call out fee. Around here bank on $90 minimum.


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Follow Up By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:03

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:03
Just to clarify any misunderstanding about the $150 fee charged.
The auto electrician had to travel 25km to our camp spot, spend 20 minutes to sort out the wiring, and nowhere near a city where prices may be more competitive
To me that is cheap insurance rather than me trying the hit and miss wire connection.
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:33

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:33
If it was wired correctly in the first instance George, blue is the brake wire and it always payed to keep a spare plug in your kit, and would have saved you that fee.

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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:56

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:56
Stephen it sounds like George was not confident in doing the job himself which is fair enough too so he has done the right thing seeking paid assistance

I think under the circumstances he has done the safe and sensible thing. The flip side could of been disastrous if there was a brake or stop/ indicator light malfunction
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:11

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:11
.
George, I agree with Alby that you did the wise thing in getting someone competent to fit the plug when you were uncertain about it.
Sure, you could have done your best but it is possible to get it wrong with expensive results.
Besides, those plugs are not the easiest to get wires into the terminals and if you are not careful it is possible to have stray wires bridge between terminals with possible harmful results.

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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 20:30

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 20:30
After reading George's reply to my post, I agree, he did the right thing. You can DIY, but if you are unsure on a safety matter such as the brakes, and if you're not confident in sorting it yourself, then call in someone more qualified.
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Follow Up By: qldcamper - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 07:43

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 07:43
I have been involved in an accident investigation for an insurance company who was trying to prove negligence and get out of a claim, and yes the brakes were wired incorrectly in series with the fridge so they would have seemed to work until the fridge was turned to 12 volts then not worked at all.
I do not know the outcome of it as I was paid only to do the investigation, write a report and sign some legal documents.
I guess it was up to the owner to reviel who actually did the wiring job.

It is another part of the $150 charge, the insurance the sparky has to carry.

$150 is cheap for what he had done for the piece of mind.
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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:37

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 15:37
Hi George s3
I'll be the first.
When I take on these repairs I have a blank sheet of paper and a $5 test lamp and draw a diagram of the colored wires and which one lights the lamp.
Firstly the plug terminals are numbered and a quick google will identify which wire goes to where.
Earth the test lamp to the car body and have wifey start the motor while you use the probe on each bare wire. Tell her r. indicator l. indicator and so on and as the test light illuminates screw it into the appropriate terminal one at a time.
For the trailer side you may need a 12v battery and a short length of cable to power up and identify each lamp.
I like to know this stuff in the event of of what happened to you happens in some isolated backwater.
Not rocket science
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Follow Up By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:12

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:12
It is always good to be wise after the event.
I now have a diagram, that suits my application, that shows where each wire is connected.
I understand colour coding when there is just a straight 7 pin plug connection.
However when you have2 additional wires to connect, that have no reference to colour coding, I was not prepared to take the risk.
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Gronk - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 22:54

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 22:54
I was an elect fitter all my life, but have never had or used a test lamp. Multimeter all the way.
If you haven’t got a wiring diagram of the plug, and like a lot of camp spots, no reception, for an untrained eye, wiring up said plug turns out to be fairly hard.
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Follow Up By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 08:14

Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 08:14
Geez Gronk, it all depends on an individual’s skill level?
What are you like at cannulating a traumatised motorcyclist on the roadside on a dark wet night or even making a perfect sourdough loaf?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 09:04

Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 09:04
.
Skill level notwithstanding, I can't say that I have ever enjoyed wiring up a fiddly trailer plug!


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Follow Up By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 10:09

Monday, Nov 22, 2021 at 10:09
All said and done Allan this thread has shown that everyone has something to offer.

On the high voltage side I recall doing a job with a guy that was an ex linesman.

There was a car into a pole with with live wires sizzling in close proximity and my ex linesman workmate picked up a nearby plastic garbage tin lid and folded it in half around the live cable and dragged it to a safer safer distance. Not me!!!

And who knows, George s3 may even be able to solve a Rubics cube in less than 4.4 seconds
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Reply By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:15

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:15
It looks like no one is prepared to own up, or otherwise, to connecting a plug or socket to an extension lead, 240v
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Follow Up By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:44

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 17:44
This post has been read by the moderation team and has been moderated due to a breach of The Inappropriate Rule .

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Follow Up By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:15

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:15
I understand what you are saying, BUT, is it legal to do the connection yourself ?
Many devices come with "How to connect" wiring diagrams
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:24

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:24
This post has been read by the moderation team and has been moderated due to a breach of The Inappropriate Rule .

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Follow Up By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:29

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:29
Hardware stores also sell GPO's and Light switches amongst other things.
Are you prepared to do your own connections and/or installations ?
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:33

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:33
240v.
Looking face on to a POWER POINT/SOCKET imagine the pin slots look like a chinaman's eyes. The left eye is active, the right eye is neutral and the vertical is earth.
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Follow Up By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:34

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 18:34
This post has been read by the moderation team and has been moderated due to a breach of The Inappropriate Rule .

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Follow Up By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:00

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:00
It would be nice to get a definitive answer/opinion from a licenced electrician rather than the handy man electricians.
cheers
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:32

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:32
"I know we should never presume, but if it was illegal, why would hardware stores sell the plugs?"

There are many cases like this where it is not illegal to sell or purchase classes of goods. However, it is illegal to use, operate or install them. For example, when Dick Smith started selling CB radios he was challenged about selling them. It was subsequently proved that he did not transgress any law, it was only those who operated them that were the transgressors.

In legal terms, our reasoning is very week under the law.


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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:38

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:38
.
George, I hold an Electrical Licence and can assure you that legislation does not permit you to legally do any electrical work other than on "Extra Low Voltage" such as automobile systems.
On 230v mains systems you can change a lightbulb and that's about all.
Now many persons will attest that they 'know enough' to perform work on mains systems and appliances but would be doing so illegally. Just as they would if they drove a car without holding a licence. And they may well have performed many installations or repairs successfully but their lack of training and experience may embody an ignorance which causes them to make errors of which they are not aware, yet are possible deathtraps.

On the subject of retail sale of electrical components....... Australian legislation makes it illegal to perform unlicensed electrical work and considers that this should be sufficient control of the safety factors. The lawmakers do not wish to make and apply laws to a greater extent than necessary and therefore do not restrict the sale of these electrical components. Suppliers such as Bunnings therefore are able to offer them for sale but these retailers usually display signs advising that they must be installed by a licensed electrician. The argument may be made that a consumer may purchase the items then engage an electrician to install them. An unlikely proposition maybe, but possible. But if they were not allowed to be sold, then there are persons who would protest for their 'freedoms' to buy what they liked!

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Follow Up By: ModSquad - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 21:03

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 21:03
Posts promoting DIY 240v stuff have been moderated.

It is illegal to DIY anything to do with 240v unless you are a licensed electrician.

We do not believe it is in anyone's interests, nor in the interests of this forum and its owners, to be promoting or discussing illegally DIYing (if that's a word) 240v stuff, no matter how simple.

Please return to discussing the 12 volt issues arising from the opening post..
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 05:21

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 05:21
George you are also not allowed to perform plumbing and gas fitting services apart from replacing basics like taps and washers but like electrical are allowed to freely purchase the items for installation by an appropriately licensed person
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 09:15

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 09:15
Where does everyone think that a Licensed Electrcian buy their “spare parts” from? Generally the same store that everyone/anyone else does. Be that Bunnings, Middys, or any other hardware store.

If the original wiring was done correctly to standard, here is a chart that shows the correct wiring for trailer plugs/sockets.




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Follow Up By: OzzieCruiser - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 12:12

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 12:12
@AlbyNSW - you said "George you are also not allowed to perform plumbing ... services"

True for most jurisdictions but not all - some Councils changed that rule for working on your own plumbing on your own property - the logic was that if a mistake was done it would be on the owner.

I was legally able to do plumbing work (and did) on a house I owned in NSW in the late 80s.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:04

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:04
.
Oh? It would not seem so from Google searching "can I do my own plumbing in NSW?"
There are heaps of responses that say "NO", apart from very minor actions such as tap washer replacement.
Like electrical installations, plumbing is State legislation, not a Council bylaw.
Perhaps there has been a legislation change since your actions? It was long ago!
Or your work was on a rural property with no mains water or network sewerage?

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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:45

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:45
My “two cents worth”, doing your own plumbing isn’t likely to kill or injure you or anyone else. Doing your own electrical work could, that would be the difference if there is one.

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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:49

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:49
@ozziecruiser
That may have been so in the 80’s but definitely not the case now. Local Council does not even have a say in it as it comes under the authority of Service NSW. The plumber has to submit compliance paperwork just like electricians do for plumbing, drainage and gas fitting.
This applies even if the property is off grid / rural and not connected to the “Waterboard” infastucture.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:55

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:55
.
I'm not so sure Macca and the Authorities clearly would not agree.
I am not informed on this but it is possibly that improper plumbing installations, both potable supply and sewerage, could bring about disease, possibly with fatal outcomes.
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 14:44

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 14:44
Yes Allan,

You are probably correct there. Also As an EDIT to my response above, the exception to this would be Gas Fitting. Get that wrong and it could kill someone.

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Follow Up By: OzzieCruiser - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 15:37

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 15:37
I can only go by my own experiences in a suburban home on the central coast - in 1986 you could not do your own plumbing but by 1987 you could - I was getting sewerage connected that has to be licenced but running of copper pipes to taps over s bends etc was legally able to be done by me as the owner - all signed off by Council so I assumed a Council rule but may have been state - at the same time plumbing work had to be done licenced plumber in Lake Macquarie and Newcastle LGAs.

If the rules have changed back then so be it but seems odd to change and change back - but hey everyone is an expert on this forum from their armchairs.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 16:13

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 16:13
.
You are so right Ozzie. lol
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Reply By: RMD - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:45

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 19:45
George.
Rule No 1. unplug before unhitch.
If left there and driven away, the trailer wiring could short and blow fuses etc anyway as it forcibly rips apart. A bit puzzled as to the "more than normal" wire count you saw when trying to reconnect. You could add a simply "pull apart" plug for future occasions! Yes, people do replace plugs etc., as Stephen mentioned. Why, because the electrician may cost very nearly 1/2 of a person's weekly income. Of course some are not concerned with cost.
Why are you trying to force people to admit or reveal what they do?
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Follow Up By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 21:26

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 21:26
Thanks for your reply RMD.
First, I am not forcing anyone to do anything, just Asking the question.
Secondly, I can replace all the wires to their correct plug terminal in accordance with the colour coding.
But, when there are 2 wires left over of a different colour, one would be for the electric brakes and the other to do with battery charging, I was at a loss to which terminal the should be connected. Even the Auto electrician had to do several tests before he could work out to which terminal the should be connected.
Cheers
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Follow Up By: RMD - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 12:33

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 12:33
George.
Your reply doesn't make sense.
With a 7 pin plug and normal wiring the colours match the numbering and 7 pins and seven core wire means NO additional wires. You assuming one for brakes and one for battery charging is correct but they are included and the info is puzzling to say the least, as all 7 are already included in the code of colours of cable cores and numbers for that 7 pin plug. How did you then have 9 wires in the plug???? You did say additional two!
If so and 7 wires cores/pins then did you suddenly have a 5 pin plug which you are not disclosing to us. You cannot wire s a 5 pin with 7 functioning wire cores, only 5 will operate.
Something you are not telling us is the key here I feel.
Yes, you were trying to get people to disclose what they do with 240 replacement plugs! To what end? Suddenly when the replies aren't what you want to hear we must stop. You haven't disclosed your reason for wanting to know.
PS. We all form pictures and possibilities in our minds to create a reply for you, if your info is confusing and not accurate to the situation then replies will vary. Some simply comment, some diagnose the presented issue.!
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:38

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 13:38
Ye George, get ya act together.
Dave.
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Reply By: george s3 - Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 21:16

Saturday, Nov 20, 2021 at 21:16
Thanks to Alan for you very detailed reply.
This will now clarify the situation regarding components connected with the 230v supply by handy men.
Hopefully this will now finalise this discussion.
Cheers
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Reply By: cookie1 - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 14:52

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 14:52
So here is my take on the situation as a Licensed Electrical Worker & Contractor.

We have to be licensed and that licence has to be renewed every 3 years for a Worker & every year for a Contractor - this is part of our costs. At the completion of each job we need to log on and fill out a Certificate of Compliance - again another cost in time spent.

Again, we need to operate a kitted out motor vehicle to get to the premises, capital cost + registration + insurance, again a cost.

Tools, calibrated meters etc etc., again a cost.

When you start to factor in all the costs to run a business, maintain the electrical licence etc etc, it adds up and we need to offset those costs through our charge out rate. So the rate George was charged seems very reasonable to me and he did the right thing.

Additionally, good operators will carry Liability Insurance for the work that they carry out - this is important, this is another cost. If a premises, for example, should burn down the first thing the insurance company will do is to investigate who did work and did it contribute to the event, they don't just pay out they will seek to minimise their financial exposure, at the completion of each job, the Certificate of Compliance tells the insurer who did any works and what work was done and if any defects were observed, if we observe a defect, advise you and you fail to have it remedied then it is on you.

Now if you were to do your own electrical work, and it contributed directly or indirectly to the fire, the insurer now has the ability to reject your claim, and the Electrical Authorities could charge you for illegal work.

I have read many conversations on here giving advice on electrical wiring and sometimes I just shake my head, I provide advice to clients, but I also pay Professional Indemnity Insurance to cover me in the event my advice is either incorrect or not followed to the letter, again another cost to my business.

Now on the 12V front, perhaps you don't need to be an Auto Electrician to do the work however, if there was a fault in the work carried out, say the brakes failed to operate on the caravan or the anti-sway, and it caused a serious accident, the insurance company may reject the claim as the work wasn't carried out correctly or by a licensed auto sparky who they could potentially hold liable and recover costs.

cheers

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Follow Up By: Pepper - Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 03:03

Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 03:03
i have had various electrical contractors complete 240v wiring on a large number of properties and was never aware there is a "certificate of compliance "...??

Should the electrical contractor provide one to the property owner,or does he just keep a record of his work for future reference ??
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 09:03

Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 09:03
.
Pepper,
Generally, the property owner should receive a copy but the specific requirements vary from State to State.
Google "electrical compliance certificate NSW (or your State) " for full details.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 10:25

Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 10:25
Pepper

Here in South Australia it is Law, and all electrical contractors MUST provide a COC (Certificate of Complience).

There is a legal book provided by the Government and all forms are in triplicate, one for the customer who had had work performed, one for the contractor that has carried out the work, and one for the Government if required.

On the form, a report is written on what work is undertaken, any faults that are observed and must by signed the the electrician that carried out the work and countersigned by the authorised by the company that carried out the work.

In the event that a COC is not supplied, fines can be implemented the of Office of the Public Regulator.
Simpson Desert Colours

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 11:21

Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 11:21
.
Hi Stephen,

Similar to other States, South Australia discontinued paper COC's in 2018. Submissions are now online and accessible by following the search reference for each State that I provided above.

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Allan

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Follow Up By: cookie1 - Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 13:52

Tuesday, Nov 23, 2021 at 13:52
Pepper,
it is important that you get the Tax Invoice that you paid the contractor on and keep it safe as that is your insurance in the event of an incident, I would go as far as calling the Technical Regulator and asking if they have a copy of the Electronic Certificate of Compliance (ECOC) as it is a legal requirement, it also safegaurds the Electrical Worker in the event something was to happen as it should clearly state what work they have done and if they noticed anything dodgy on the COC.

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Reply By: Member - DOZER - Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 16:50

Sunday, Nov 21, 2021 at 16:50
$150 well spent. We all cant be trailer wiring gurus, those of us that think its easy, are naturals at it, and dont realise how hard it actually is to grow a third hand and not stab yourself, let alone get all those small wires into the recepticals. What other option did you have? illegally drive on the road without lights?? It takes 5 seconds to kill someone with 240 volts....many professionals have died climbing through roof cavities....yes you can have a go, consequences may be severe or none at all...
b4 you bag me out, walk a mile in my shoes, then your a mile away and have my shoes :)

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