Checking Gas bottle levels.

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:13
ThreadID: 19753 Views:80886 Replies:14 FollowUps:13
This Thread has been Archived
Whats the way to check the level of gas in a used bottle??
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: signman - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:15

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:15
Apart from lighting a match to see down the hole!!!
Don't want a BLEVE here thanks.
AnswerID: 94808

Follow Up By: Member - bushfix - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:53

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:53
g'day signman,

you mean a PUVCE don't you? :)
0
FollowupID: 353687

Reply By: sdc - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:22

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:22
Pour a jug of boiling water down the side of the bottle then slowly run your hand up from the base of the bottle. You will notice a change in temperature at some point ie hotter this is the approx level of the liquid inside.

sdc
AnswerID: 94809

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 18:03

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 18:03
Agree TOTALLY.

This is the most simple method. I've been using it for years and it works.
0
FollowupID: 353731

Reply By: Member - Captain (WA) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:30

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:30
Hi signman,

Weigh your gas bottle (use bathroom scales is usualy easiset) and subtract the weight of the gas bottle that is stamped on the collar. The difference between the measured weight and stamped weight is the weight of gas in the bottle.

Cheers

Captain
Its not what you drive, but how you drive it!
LC 200 + AOR Quantum

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Classifieds: AGM battery 120 a.hr (2 available)

AnswerID: 94811

Reply By: Marko - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:51

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:51
G'day signman

Easiest way is to buy from the shop a gas bottle gauge. For about $10.00 it sticks to the side of the bottle and you pour hot water over it. The indicator changes colour and shows you how full/empty the bottle is.

A few pictures/prices here
AnswerID: 94814

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 19:13

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 19:13
This is a variation of the finger up the side of the bottle technique.

I had one (some kind soul bought it for me), it worked well but eventually fell off and I just reverted to the finger.

Cheers,

Jim.
0
FollowupID: 353746

Reply By: shaggy - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:51

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:51
Gday signman,
the best way is to find the tare weight of your bottle. This will be labeled ie. T.C. 10.0 kg. Next to there will be the bottles water capacity. ie W.C. 22.0 kg. This means that the bottle's volume is 22 litres of water. A gas bottle by law can only be filled to a certain pressure, and when you fill it at the station, this pressure is achieved. The propane or propane/butane mix at that pressure will weigh about 41% of the water capacity. This means that: 41% of 22 Kg or L, is equal to 9 kg. This is a standard 9kg gas bottle. But this gas will occupy 22L of space, (not really, there will also be liquified gas present), but thats not important for now. So if you weigh your bottle once it has been filled, it should weigh Tare Weight + Gas weight ie 10.0 + 9.0 kg, should be around 19 kg. So after a few weeks, if your bottle weighs 15 kg, you have used 4 kg of gas, and have 5 kg of gas remaining. An empty bottle will still weigh 10.0kg (or whatever is stamped). If you use the same scale each time to weigh the bottle, this can be quite an accurate measurement. You can also check whether you have recieved a full fill from the gas station ie the bottle should weigh close to 19 kg full.

Pouring boiling water onto pressure vessels is a butchers way of doing it, and is deffinitely not something that is advocated in the chemical industry. But boys will be boys...

Hope this answers your question
Cheers

AnswerID: 94815

Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Epping .Syd. - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 14:09

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 14:09
Shaggy ,
That's the most complete answer to a question I have ever seen . Well done .
Willie .
0
FollowupID: 353694

Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 15:21

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 15:21
Yeh Shaggy,
What Willie said ^^^^^^^^
0
FollowupID: 353704

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 19:03

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 19:03
Hey Shaggy,

The "Butcher's" way of doing it may not be all that scientific but it does tell you if your bottle is half, three quarters or a third or whatever full. What more do you need to know?

Pretty much like a fuel gauge on a car. Tells you when you are getting close to empty, not exactly how many litres are left.

Simple but effective.

Cheers,

Jim.
0
FollowupID: 353741

Reply By: Top Cat - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:52

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:52
This is how i do it and it gives an accurate indication.

Make certain that there are no hoses attached firstly.

Then simply open the tap a small ammount so that a little gas is escaping.

Now tip the bottle slowly over.......possibly even starting to turn it upside down.

When you see the white gas (frozen liguid petroleum gas) escaping then that is the level of the liquid in the bottle.

ie........imagine it was water and you are tipping it over........so anything below the level line from that moment is what is left.

So if you turn the bottle hal;fway......ie it is at 90degrees to normal then u have a half full tank.

This works because the LPG is actually stored as a liquid in the bottle and will start to flow out as a liquid when given the opportunity just like water would.

When exposed to the atmosphere it turns into a gas.

Cheers.
AnswerID: 94816

Follow Up By: Utemad - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:57

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 12:57
Hope you're not a smoker !!!
0
FollowupID: 353688

Follow Up By: Top Cat - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 14:28

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 14:28
Actually that is a good point and one that i probably should have made.

Cheers.
0
FollowupID: 353699

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 19:10

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 19:10
Sounds a little dangerous to me TC.

What happens if the bottle slips whilst you are doing this, hits something and causes a spark. KERBOOM.

I know the chances are unlikely, but no risk is better than a small risk IMHO.

Cheers,

Jim.
0
FollowupID: 353745

Reply By: signman - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 14:14

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 14:14
Message to BUSHFIX
Here at our fire service, we call it a BLEVE
Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapour Explosion.
Check out BLEVE on your search...there's some great pics.

To all other with the answers to my query...many thanks

Signman
AnswerID: 94826

Follow Up By: Member - bushfix - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 15:04

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 15:04
G'day signman,

yeah I know what a BLEVE is but your suggestion to light a match to see down the hole means the hole is open so gas is escaping so you have an uncontrolled vapour cloud. Combine that with lit match and you have a Percussive Uncontrolled Vapour Cloud Explosion, PUVCE, albeit a very small one.

BLEVE would be caused by the gas bottle being heated to such a point that as the liquid gas heats, it vapourises and expands, the gas bottle eventually has to accomodate that expanding, so ruptures. A lit match would not provide enough heat for a BLEVE.

anyway what I believe, cheers from one firey to another.

Jeremy.
0
FollowupID: 353702

Follow Up By: Member - Hugh (WA) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 17:02

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 17:02
Hi Signman,

My understanding of BLEVE is as explained by Bushfix above. I'm not a firey, just something I remember from a Occ Health & Safety video from years ago.

Regards,
Hugh
0
FollowupID: 353718

Reply By: Nudenut - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 17:48

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 17:48
weigh it!!!
AnswerID: 94855

Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 18:30

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 18:30
I've got a really good way.... (I'm obviously not as clever as the other boys who replied earlier in this post) but I just went out and bought a 1kg bottle for $20 or so and when I run out I know I've got none left. LOL
The 1 Litire I then use until I get a chance to fill the big bugger back up. That way I'm always filling up (or exchanging) a totally empty bottle and get my $$$ worth.

PS I also have a 2kg bottle. Normally I take the 2kg and 1kg camping and the 9kg I use for the BBQ. But the principle works accross the whole lot anyway. I mix and match depending on the situation...

AnswerID: 94863

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 19:07

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 19:07
Sure you're clever Jeff.

You'll never run out of gas and isn't that the aim?

I do the same.I carry a 2kg and a 3kg bottle in the camper. When one is empty, swap them and get the empty one filled.

Cheers,

Jim.
0
FollowupID: 353742

Follow Up By: Rocky M QLD - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:38

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:38
HI all,
we carry spare hoses and spare belts and spare tyres and of cause spare gas bottles.That way all is good all the time.It might be a really small fellow but it will get you to the next filler station.
Regards Dave
0
FollowupID: 353764

Reply By: Member - David 0- Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 20:18

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 20:18
Weight it
AnswerID: 94873

Reply By: David Au - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:06

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:06
These ultrasonic units are great. Work perfectly well on the Australian 9kg bottles because they are larger diameter, not taller than UK bottles.
Sonatic Gas Level System
AnswerID: 94882

Reply By: Member - Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 00:42

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 00:42
My old 4.5kg Gas cylinder has an internal float connected to a little plastic gauge which gives an accurate reading of contents.

Have paid almost the cost of a new cylinder, to have the bottle tested and re-certified for another ten years, cause I really like this accessory.

I think they are still available on some brands of gas cylinders and can also be installed by a gas retail outlet, such as Maxbuilt in S.A. Price, don't know.

Haven't bothered to retrofit my other cylinders though.
If the 9kg Barbecue bottle runs out at home, I use the 4.5kg one with the gauge until the other has been refilled.

When camping, I have a 2kg bottle as an auxiliary.
Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 94928

Reply By: Gully - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 08:50

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 08:50
Hi Signman;
Weighing the cylinder and subtracting the tare weight stamped on the valve guard/handle is obviously the most accurate way of determining the remaining amount of gas in your cylinder. However, I don't know too many people who go camping with their bathroom scales, quite appart from the fact that every set of scales that I have ever stood on have lied about my weight! I have a thing called a gasfuse on my 9kg BBQ cylinder. I think they were popular during the 80's as a christmes present. The gasfuse' primary job is to stop the flow of gas from the cylinder if there is a leaky hose/connection (safety first!), it also has a guage that gives an indication of the level of gas in the cylinder. I don't even know if they are still available but they were retailed through K-mart and Big W. Carrying 2 cylinders is a great way of insuring that you have a backup supply and this is our preffered method.
Cheers.

AnswerID: 94951

Reply By: Member - Ray C (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 14:18

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 14:18
Never use mine without a GASFUSE anyway, It's got a gauge built in. Just make sure you get it back when you refill!!
AnswerID: 94983

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)