INOX Test

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 20:03
ThreadID: 19769 Views:1554 Replies:6 FollowUps:9
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I've got an old 80 amp wet cell DC Batt kicking around that I plan to put in the camper to just run lights (I'm sick of plugging into the car aux batt and the time taken to pack and unpack leads) and just run the fridge from the aux batt in the car.

The old DC generally holds about 12.3 volts after a charge, indicating about 70% charged, so she's not brilliant, but not stuffed. I'm going to see of INOX gives the old girl back some life.

Here's what I plan to do. Give the old DC a solid charge and then let it stand for 12 hours to let it settle and then take a voltage reading. Then I'll connect a thermo cooler I have (which draws a constant 4 amps) for 6 hours, turn it off, let the batt settle again and take another reading.

Then I'll add the INOX and go through the whole process again to see if it makes any difference, by comparing the comparitive readings.

Any suggestions (other than using an hydrometer because I don't have one and reckon the voltage reading will be a "constant" comparison).

Cheers'

Jim.
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Reply By: Member - Russell B (SA) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:05

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:05
I reckon the Inox works, I put it in the Pajeros battery when I bought it, two cells were under voltage and after two weeks were back upto average for all cells and held a good charge, the battery lasted 18months.

The only real test would be to measure each cell with a hydrometer (cheap from auto store) add the inox and charge the battery watching it over time in weeks trying to keep the battery fully charged.

Thats my two bobs worth.

Regards

Russell

AnswerID: 94881

Reply By: hl - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:54

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:54
Hi,
It can work, but it does take a fair while, like a few weeks, in my experience.
Will be interested in your results.

Cheers
AnswerID: 94893

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 22:17

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 22:17
Well, I'll give it a further test after a few weeks.

For the paltry sum of eight dollars it may ne interesting.
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FollowupID: 353768

Reply By: Rick Blaine - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:54

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 21:54
I found Inox to be one of the rare products that does as advertised... It dissoves the sulfate that "grows" on the plates and also dissolves the sulphate if it gets loosened & falls to the bottom of the cell & " shorts" it out....It does take time to work... depending on the amount of contamination in the cells...I also found a trick was to empty out the electrolyte after the inox had done its job and fill with new electrolyte...I have salvaged several old heavy duty Traction batteries this way...
AnswerID: 94894

Reply By: Eric Experience. - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 22:36

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 22:36
Jimbo.
You are a legend. You are about to discover why you can not use battery voltage as an indication of charge. we are waiting. Eric.
AnswerID: 94908

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 23:01

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 23:01
Eric,

Please elaborate. I don't understand your point, many established, knowledgeable sources depend on voltage as an indication of charge.

What am I doing wrong?

Cheers,

Jim.
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FollowupID: 353777

Follow Up By: Eric Experience. - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 23:23

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 23:23
Jimbo.
You say this battery has been around for a while.
That means it will be partly sulfated, just imagine that 90% of the plates are sulfated, that means you have charged 10% of the plates to 70% of the possible charge, so what have you got? I make it 7%.
We will soon see. Eric.
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FollowupID: 353781

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 08:03

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 08:03
Eric,

That is the point of the test; to remove sulphation as that is what INOX claims to do.

Jim.
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FollowupID: 353800

Follow Up By: porlsprado - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 10:15

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 10:15
Eric, how do we properly dispose of old electrolyte ?
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FollowupID: 353818

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 10:46

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 10:46
I would suggest mixing bi-carb soda with it (first by mixing the bi-carb into a solution with water) and adding to the elctrolyte that has been tipped into a suitable container. This will neutralise the acid. Keep adding the bi-carb mix until no further bubbling occurs when you add it.

Whether or not there is some lead in the electrolyte that will still leave the residue poisonous I'm not sure. I'll leave that to someone else. The bi-carb will render the electrolyte non corrosive and safe to handle from a burns point of view.

Cheers,

Jim.
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FollowupID: 353823

Reply By: Member - Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 23:54

Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005 at 23:54
Jimbo,

If the battery was of the sealed type, your idea would have merit for a cheap
method of determining if the battery is still serviceable.

But mate, don't discount the humble hydrometer wherever it can be used.
It is still the best method of testing the individual "health" of cells and they are only a couple of dollars from "anywhere". (Supercheap, Kmart, Repco, etc.)

Eric also makes a valid point (albeit a little sarcastically) re probable sulfation if the battery has been left unused and uncharged for a prolonged period of time.

My charger (3 stage, computer controlled jobbie) actually tests for sulfation and gives it a belt if it is detected, but these are not cheap.

Give the hydrometer some thought Jimbo, it is so simple to use.

Bill


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AnswerID: 94924

Follow Up By: Eric Experience. - Thursday, Jan 27, 2005 at 23:15

Thursday, Jan 27, 2005 at 23:15
Sand man.
I have been stewing over you comment that my reply to Jimbo was sarcastic, I have re read it and I dont see the problem, could you please explain to me why you said it was sarcastic, I wont to know because I dont want to unpleasant and would like to improve my communication skills. I am not abusing you [I hope] I just want to know. Eric.
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FollowupID: 354056

Follow Up By: Muddy 'doe (SA) - Thursday, Jan 27, 2005 at 23:26

Thursday, Jan 27, 2005 at 23:26
Eric, I too thought you were a LITTLE bit sarcastic taking into account the brevity of your first response. Maybe a bit dismissive.

Just the way it reads.

Cheers
Muddy
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FollowupID: 354057

Reply By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 08:05

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 08:05
Thanks for all the feedback.

Before I start I'll get an hydrometer as well and tkae some readings.

Cheers,

Jim.
AnswerID: 94943

Follow Up By: G.T. - Thursday, Jan 27, 2005 at 12:31

Thursday, Jan 27, 2005 at 12:31
It will be interesting to see if the hydrometer readings are in proportion to the voltage readings when the battery gains charge or is discharged due to use. Good luck. Regards G.T.
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FollowupID: 353941

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