20% off chain saws at Mitre 10

Submitted: Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 17:47
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Today and tomorrow Mitre 10 have an up to 40% off sale. I snagged a little toy Talon Chainsaw, 35cc, for $159 with a two year warranty. I've used the bow saw for the last time. Cutting through 5 to 6 inch logs with a bow saw is just too damn hard for this old bloke.

It's only a toy but should do me fine for cutting some firewood.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Reply By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 17:57

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 17:57
Hey there Jimbo

If you ever have any little snags with it - lemme know. My wife works at Talon and manages all the shiiping logistics from China. She can get anything fixed for ya.

I've got (funnily enough) three Talon chainsaws (including a cusom-constructed one!!!) for our place down in Cooma. I cut some pretty big wood with them and quite frankly have had nothing but a good run. They start very easily (if you prime them and use the choke as per the instructions) and actually have a bit of grunt. I wouldn't compare them to a Husky or Stihl, but for what you pay they are very good little units.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 18:02

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 18:02
Thanks Chrispy,

Good to hear they're not just cheapo Chinese junk.

Don't expect it to last like a Husky, but for the little use I will give it, I reckon I'll be hard pressed to wear it out. I figure if all it ever does is cut 160 logs that's $1 per log. I use a lot more than $1 of my effort to cut the same log. Cheap convenience.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:29

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:29
hehe.. no wurries Jim.

Even with our little one (same as yours) I can get through 12" yellowbox OK. Keep the chain sharp (as per usual practice) and the bar oil up, and you'll whizz through the 6" jobs. If you get a storage case and chain guard for it (about $40 in the shops) you can take easily throw it in the back for those High Country trips..... Ours rarely leaves the car.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:37

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:37
Chrispy,

What sort of oil do you use for the chain lube. I just whacked some Castrol 4 stroke oil in it as that's all I've ever used in an electric chainsaw we've has for over twenty years.

It actually came with a chain guard.

Your thoughts?

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: Member - bushfix - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:42

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:42
G'day Jimbo,

is the bar oil going down at roughly the same rate as the fuel? If so, I reckon stick with it.

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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:43

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:43
Jim - you HAVE to use proper bar oil. It's quite high in viscosity - about the same as a thick diff oil - if not thicker. Lighter oils will just spurt out too quickly - you'll run out really quickly and you'll stuff the chain, sprocket and guides in no time.

Just go to Bunnings (or a mower shop) and buy it - about $7.00 for 500ml if I remember correctly. Remember - it's called "Bar Oil".

Cheers
Chris
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:49

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:49
OK - I'll lighten up on the "HAVE to" ( I had to type that because Jenny was standing over my shoulder - Miss Talon)...let's just say that you "should" use proper bar oil..... I suppose whatever works at the end of the day. :)

LOL!!
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:57

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:57
Thanks Chrispy,

I'll get some.

So you've got a Jenny as well. I nearly fell off the chair last night when my Jenny said "why don't you get a chainsaw tomorrow?" after her saying two months ago "don't spend any more bloody money". I think she took pity on me after seeing me sweat with the bow saw a few weeks ago.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:06

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:06
LOL!!

Yep - these "Jennys" are a handful huh! ;)

I suppose that I'm lucky - my version is as big a gear freak as I am. She also works at Great Outdoors on the weekends, and always comes home with more camping or 4WD trinkets. Silly thing is that it's actually ME that has to pull the handbrake on.... someone's got to look after the mortgage :(
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Reply By: cokeaddict - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 18:12

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 18:12
I second what Chrispy said, I got one too about 19 months ago and its a ripper. Does everything i need t to do and does it well. They are not a toy in my books.
Cheers
Ange
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 18:23

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 18:23
Thanks Ange,

Hope mine does just as well.

Mine is the baby one 35cm/14 inch bar, 35cc motor. Is this similar to your's and what size logs can it cope with?

How did you get on with your kitchen in the end?

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 23:47

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 23:47
Hi Jim,
kitchen is on hold for now, lost the pics you sent when my HDD had a meltdown. Didnt want to bother you with asking for them again, figured its a hassle for ya.

The chain saw is same as mine. Mine was the first run that bunnings sold so they have improved them a bit with time. Its a bloody ripper alright. I just had an Ironbark tree cut down in front yard and the guys left it behind for me to cut into 1/4's The tree base cuttings are 78cm in diameter. The chainsaw is making easy work of them but i have the advantage where i can roll them on ground as i cut, using a stopper to stop the timber taking off. As its Ironbark I let the chain cut at its own pace once i pass the loose outer edge, no point burning the chain, not at 25 bucks a pop.

Stay safe Jim
Cheers Ange
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Reply By: Member - Jack - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:59

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 19:59
You mean you've turfed your bow saw out? Oh dear :)
Jack
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AnswerID: 97715

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:14

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:14
No Jack,

It'll still stay in the toolbox for light work, 2 to 3 inch logs which it does a treat. Wouldn't bother getting the chain saw out for those. Also nice and light to carry. Two weeks ago my son and I found a fallen sapling that was still semi rooted (in the ground that is) and used the bow saw to free it and then lug it back to camp. Wouldn't like to have been lugging a chain saw as well.

But the last time I tried to cut up a decent 6 to 8 inch log with it, it was just too bloody hard. Maybe I'm getting soft at the ripe old age of 43.

My "Jack" bow saw still has its place.

Cheers Mate,

Jim.
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Reply By: Member - bushfix - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:03

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:03
Don't know if you are an experienced chainsaw operator but one other thing mate, dont' forget your ppe, safety gear. At a minimum, goggles/safety glasses. If you are a first timer then please seek some basic training. Too many people think of them as "a toy" when they are actually very dangerous tools for the ignorant. Sorry for the mini rant but I have seen what they can do to the human body.

:) Jeremy.
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:08

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:08
Damn good advice. I also use industrial ear muffs and a full-face polycarbonate guard.
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Follow Up By: Member - bushfix - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:18

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:18
fair dinkum...with my old man's (a Doc) experience, and mine in the RFS, I wear chaps (no they are NOT poofta gear, try holding your leg together after a saw has said g'day,) full mesh face guard with indo ear muffs, steel caps etc. and TRAINING, not just on the tool but SAFETY. Maybe contact STIHL for a copy of "Chainsaw Charlie." These things can be lethal.

ranting again (in your best interests) Jeremy.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:23

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:23
Fair call bushfix,

I respect any form of power tool. Whilst I am not a super experienced user, I have used an electric chainsaw carefully for years.

Quite frankly they scare the hell out me and I treat them accordingly.

I won't use a whipper snipper without glasses, the stuff that flies up at speed hurts my face enough, christ knows what it could do to your eyeball.

Toy by chainsaw standards perhaps, but will take your arm off quicker than a Pit Bull.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: AdrianLR - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:23

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:23
Just to add...things happen very quickly with a chainsaw. One rule I stick to is "no helpers" particularly kids, holding on to the end of the stick being cut or similar. The other thing is you're wearing ear muffs, the saw's loud and you're concentrating on what you're doing - not a good recipe for yelling at people to get out of the way or to hear them yelling that the rest of the tree is going to fall on you.

Safety first in the case of chainsaws is one of the few things in life you need to take seriously!

They are fun though.

Adrian
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Reply By: Glenn (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:38

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:38
Howdy Jimbo,

Last time I saw you cutting wood, well splitting wood, you were busting a gut, as well as the handle on the splitter...I hope you have better luck with the chainsaw. Will you be bringing it on the HC tour?

Cheers

Glenn
AnswerID: 97725

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:49

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 20:49
Glenn,

I'd kinda hoped my effort with log splitter would drift off into the wild blue yonder, but I knew deep down some mongrel would raise it LOL. I guess we all have to live with our sins.

Yeah I'll bring the saw, gotta be better with that than a splitter LOL.

"Jimbo; have chainsaw, will travel."

Cheers Mate.
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 21:40

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 21:40
Geez Jimbo, I near weed when I heard about you and the splitter, chainsaws are far more damagous mate, be careful OK?
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Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 22:28

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 22:28
bleep ,

You might hope your mates would protect you rather than mocking you.

If Glenn's brain was as big as his mouth he'd be another Einstein LOL. He can't keep a secret. The splitter episode was supposed to be kept quiet, well I thought so at least.

With mates like you two, I'd better join the YMCA. LOL.

I better go and buy a tomahawk. Surely even I couldn't do much damage with that.

Cheers,

Jim.
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Follow Up By: Glenn (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 22:44

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 22:44
Hi Jimbo...I still love you mate, even after that tongue lashing. I don't recall telling Bonz about it....honest...but with my reputation, who would believe me...hahahahahaha

Cheers

Glenn
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Reply By: ianmc - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 22:27

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 22:27
Whats far more dangerous than a chain saw?
Being up the top of a 15' ladder with one. Yep thats what I tried to do.The ladder was leaning against a fairly thick manna gum limb & I was trying to cut the end off the limb as it threatened the house.
Got the end off the limb but it hung by the green bark before dropping, nearly hitting the ladder but worse to come.
When it eventually broke off the limb sprang upwards & the ladder was leaning against thin air with me & the put putting chain saw at the top.
Amazing what goes thru the brain box in a fraction of a second . Ditched the saw in front of the ladder & proceeded to free fall 12-15ft landing on the base of my back on some hard sticks.
Even more amazing was that the chain saw was undamaged & continued to run whilst I was sitting wondering what was broken.
While in this state missus came out & said "what do you think you are doing sitting there?"
Well I forgave her (nice me) & I was undamaged but she left a few years later anyway!
AnswerID: 97757

Reply By: Member - Moggs - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 23:35

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 23:35
Hi Jimbo, I also have a Talon saw - 38cc, came with a case and chain guard. I also have found it to be reliable and a good saw - always starts first time. I just need to remember to pack it, last trip to Bendethera after a storm and there I was swinging the axe on a tree across the track cursing the chainsaw sitting in my garage LOL
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Reply By: motherhen - Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 23:38

Thursday, Feb 10, 2005 at 23:38
Were considering a small electric one to run of the Genny. Met someone on the tracks who does this. Just to trim the odd branch off the road, or clear the high ones for the caravan to get through. I was going to get a hand saw, but much prefer the electric idea. No petrol and oil to slosh around either - the chain saw box always gets pretty feral.
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Friday, Feb 11, 2005 at 11:39

Friday, Feb 11, 2005 at 11:39
Uhhmm... so what do you fuel the generator with?
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Follow Up By: motherhen - Friday, Feb 11, 2005 at 23:53

Friday, Feb 11, 2005 at 23:53
Dragon's breath Chrispy!

No, seriously, we will have the genny and the petrol can in the box on the drawbar, but the chainsaw will live in the cargo compartment under the bed. A bit of fuel and oil can escape from a petrol chainsaw, and our chainsaw box is usually pretty grotty & smelly. The electric one won't cause that problem. It will be just for emergency clearing of branches.

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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Saturday, Feb 12, 2005 at 07:51

Saturday, Feb 12, 2005 at 07:51
LOL!!

hehe.. sorry .. didn't mean it to sound like it might have :)

I understand your point. I wouldn't want a petrol-powered thing of any sort wafting fumes all over the place if it was stored under my bed either!
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Follow Up By: motherhen - Saturday, Feb 12, 2005 at 18:54

Saturday, Feb 12, 2005 at 18:54
Chrispy - i note your nice roof top tent. What sort is it? Easy to use? Increase fuel consumption compared to nothing on the roof? How strong is it? - My husband is a big fellow. I have considered this rather than an on the ground amongst the crocodiles tent, for times we may not be able to take to BT caravan somewhere. Any feedback appreciated.
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Saturday, Feb 12, 2005 at 20:09

Saturday, Feb 12, 2005 at 20:09
Hi motherhen :)

Q) Chrispy - i note your nice roof top tent. What sort is it?

A) It's a South African "EezyAwn" - imported & sold through OpenSky in Sydney. http://www.opensky.com.au/

It's an "Elite" model, 1,440mm wide and 2,880 long when opened. It's around 1,200mm high at the centre. Weighs approx 55kg.

Q) Easy to use?

A) Yep! Get to your campsite, unbuckle the cover, flip it over, pull down the ladder. Open a couple of clips and it's ready to sleep in. We have it down to about 2 minutes. The rest of the group with you are still trying to find flat ground to pitch a tent on. Packup takes a bit longer, but we are away in about 5 minutes. Keep all your bedding inside - saves room in the car.

Q) Increase fuel consumption compared to nothing on the roof?

A) I run a diesel, and it's so good on the juice, so it's hard to tell. I reckon that it does affect airflow over the car, but it has a reasonably rounded front, so it's not all that bad. No more than a roofrack with stuff tied to it.

Q) How strong is it?

A) You won't break it. We've had four people up there. The weakest points are your roofracks.

It'd be great for camping up and out of trouble - crocs included. It's beautifully cool up there in summer with all the doors open, and in winter it's warmer - because you are not on the ground. The thing is so well made that it will last for years - like 20! I'll be handing ours down to the next generation..... :)

Cheers
Chris
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Reply By: GazzaS (VIC) - Friday, Feb 11, 2005 at 11:33

Friday, Feb 11, 2005 at 11:33
Hi Jimbo

thanks for the post very timely as I was just thionking yesterday about getting a small chain saw but didn't want to spend $200.

I have been a bit sneaky. found a local mitre/10 and they confirmed price and discount. then checked good old Bunnings. The Talons are a regularly stocked item (just none in stock at moment) so I have ordered one from them at $159 -15%.

Cheers

Gazza
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Reply By: Rosco - Bris. - Friday, Feb 11, 2005 at 16:21

Friday, Feb 11, 2005 at 16:21
Nice sorta mongrel you'd be Jimbo old mate.

Ya get me all fired up so off to the local Mitre 10 I trot after a Talon for $160.
Sorry mate, don't know about petrol jobs ... all we've got are these little leccie ones.

No bloody good to me says I ... haven't got an extension lead long enough.

But I'm into a chain saw buying frenzy .. what can I do??

End of story .. I walk out with a 33cc Homelite for $300 less 20% ($240)
So that's $80 ya owe me ...........

AND I BOUGHT SOME BAR OIL !!!!!! .... for the saw ;-]

Cheers cob
AnswerID: 97875

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