Circular water tank in spare wheel cavity

Submitted: Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 08:37
ThreadID: 20394 Views:8096 Replies:8 FollowUps:11
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Hi all

Has anyone ever heard of any manufacturer making circular water tanks that fit into the spare wheel cavity under the rear floor (of any type of vehicle that used to store the spare there)? I'm moving my spare out to a rear carrier, leaving a lovely hole under the floor that will take a 31" tyre. The reason I'm moving it is because I have a set of roller drawers (hinged at the front) that sit in the back making access to the spare a right-royal PITA. I'm guestimating that there is around 35-40 litres-worth of tank - if not more - that I could build in to that space.

Anyone ever done it on their vehicles?

Cheers
Chris
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Reply By: Savvas - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 08:55

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 08:55
I haven't heard of one, but what a great idea!

AnswerID: 98098

Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:07

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:07
hehe..thanks Savvas :)

Yeah...after moving to the Jeep - it's a fair bit smaller than our GQ, so any better use of space is always a consideration. I was thinking of putting a diesel tank there, but I'll be putting that underneath along the LHS chassis rail (even though it's monocoque - it has some beefy rails still). So... water it is. Just a question now of how to plumb filler and outlet hoses through the walls of the cavity...
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Reply By: Lone Wolf - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:29

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:29
I second Savvas's opinion.....

Top idea!!

What about a bladder?

Wolfie
AnswerID: 98104

Reply By: Andrew from TrekTable - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:30

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:30
Chrispy,

I don't know of anyone making a specific tank for the purpose but I would suggest you could use a normal bladder tank. You can buy them quite cheap from marine chandleries. I think I paid about $80 for my 100litre tank. They are flexible and tough so they mould to almost any shape and would be very good for what you want. You could drop an outlet pipe thru your floor to achieve a gravity discharge.

Just a thought.

andrew
AnswerID: 98105

Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:06

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:06
Thanks Andrew - Do you know the approximate dimensions of your 100L bladder?
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Follow Up By: Andrew from TrekTable - Wednesday, Feb 16, 2005 at 21:54

Wednesday, Feb 16, 2005 at 21:54
Chrispy,

Apologies for the delay. I've been away.

I don't actually have my 100 litre bladder tank anymore because I sold it with my last boat. But from memory it was about 0.8m x 0.4 x0.2 (I think).

If you pop into a nearby chandlery, you'll be able to measure one no probs.

Andrew
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Reply By: Member - David C (QLD) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:35

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:35
It is a great idea. In the case of a 31x10.5 tyre, you get 129.87 useable litres of space (pie x r² x h). That makes for a very useful water tank (albeit a heavy one).

Regards
David
AnswerID: 98107

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:43

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:43
Someone's been using a calculator!!!!!!
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:01

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:01
Thanks David

Yup - I get about the same figure doing the PiR squared by depth calculation too. There are a few protrusions (small hub in the centre of the cavity which houses the tie-down for the spare, but that's about it. I reckon around 65-80 litres would be sufficient. I want to go with a stainless tank taher than a bladder. Although the bladders do conform to irregular shapes, I'm just afraid of constant rubbing and chafing of a bladder tank while it's under the drawers - so it would never see the light of day for periodic inspection. At least with stainless - I'd be happy to leave it alone for years.

I'm definitely going to investigate further - and if no manufacturer has already thought of this idea, I'll whip up to Out of Town 4WD in the Newcastle area who manufacture from scratch. They're currently developing (this week!!) a long range tank for the Grand Cherokee CRD anyway - so this might be a good project for them too.
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 12:34

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 12:34
"you get 129.87 useable litres of space (pie x r² x h"

I am having some problems with this. The mensuration seems a little wrong.

Think of it this way............

60 - 70 litre petrol tank........... with a 127 litre recess...............

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 12:53

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 12:53
Well, I did the math, and you guys are right. Perhaps the fuel tank is like the Tardis!!

I just look at a 44 gallon drum, and think....... 200 litres........

I look at a wheel & tyre, and think........... maybe 40! I was wrong!!

I'm goin' back to school.......... with my slide rule!!

Wolfie
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 12:58

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 12:58
Actually - it's less.

31" wheel x 10" depth = 78cm diameter x 25.4 deep.

Radius = 1/2 dia, so we say 39cm radius.

Pi R squared = 3.141 x 1,521 (39 squared) = 4,777

multiply by depth (25.4) = 121,347 cm2 or 121 litres.

Given that there would be gaps down the sides and because of the hump in the middle of the well, lets losw 30 liters. We still wind up with 90 litres of usable volume.

Looks good to me ...... :)
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Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 12:59

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 12:59
(typo - cm3 not cm2)
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Reply By: Ray Bates - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:54

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 09:54
Hi Why not use a modified inner tube?
AnswerID: 98109

Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:04

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:04
Ray - don't inner tubes have a dust-coated interior? I think they dist it so that the inner walls don't stick together. It might be alright for washing water, but I'm not sure that I'd want to drink from it.

The shape would be right though! :)
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Reply By: udm - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:09

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:09
I´ve seen somebody making some kind of tank, can´t recall if it was a water or lpg tank.
AnswerID: 98110

Reply By: Coops (Ex-Pilbara) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:36

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 10:36
what a superb idea.
I'd patent that one if it's not already taken
AnswerID: 98114

Reply By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 11:03

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 11:03
Thanks everyone :)

The other reason why I was thinking stainless was that if I wanted to mount the filler and outlet on the rear face of the drawer system (inside the car) then I could pressurise the tank a little with the on-board compressor and be able to flow the water upwards and out the back of the drawers against gravity. It would be a very neat installation I think.
AnswerID: 98116

Follow Up By: Puddin & Gumnut (Sydney) - Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 17:24

Sunday, Feb 13, 2005 at 17:24
ring some stainless steel manufactures & ask them but I don't think it will be cheap or easy to make as it's round. you could use a shure flow pump to suck it out if you can get it made. If you live in Sydney there is a stainless guy behind TJM @ Blacktown.
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