Bush Welding

Submitted: Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 12:08
ThreadID: 22109 Views:5979 Replies:9 FollowUps:7
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Hi Guys
Has anyone had experience with bush welding . I gather if you connect 2 x 12volt batteries in series and connect a normal handpiece from a mains operated electric welder it will work. What I'm after is any tips on preferred welding rod size and type, roughly how long (welding time) do you get out of a pair of Landcruiser batteries and is it necessary to limit the current from the battery in some way. Also any other tips on doing the job.
Regards
Lance
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Reply By: Rob - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 13:22

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 13:22
I did some welding on an ARB 2nd battery tray at Durba Springs. Used 2 x N70
landcruiser batteries. Did not limit the current (I cannot think how to do this
without specialist equipment).

Any tips??

1. This was my first time welding - I wish I had practised this before with some expert instruction. The result was OK in the end!

2. Make sure no sparks can fly off the welding work and reach the batteries. (BOOM)

3. I used some jump leads for the connections. Next time I will make some jump leads out of old welding cable - good current capacity.

4. Keep a welding glass somewhere safe and then make a facemask out of cardboard when you need it. I used 2 pairs of sunglasses! Not really the best situation.

Happy welding,

Rob
AnswerID: 107023

Follow Up By: Lanceo1 - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 13:36

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 13:36
Thanks Rob
Can you remember what diameter welding rods were right for the batteries
Lance
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Follow Up By: Rob - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 13:45

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 13:45
Hmmm - to be honest - no. From memory I would say that they would have been 3 or 4 mm diameter (does this make sense??)

One more thing - the person who gave me the rods said that you should ideally start work with a new rod from a sealed packet so that it was dry. One that had been lying at the bottom of a toolbox would absorb water (from the air??) and become more difficult to work with.

Rob

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Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 14:15

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 14:15
>Did not limit the current (I cannot think how to do this
>without specialist equipment)

Vary the size of the wire you use to connect the two batteries together. eg. Using a jump lead to connect them will, effectively, provide no limitation to the current at all. Using a piece of fencing wire will provide a bit of resistance, using some 10A cable of the kind used for car wiring will provide a bit more and so on. When using the thinner cable expect it burn out (like a fuse) from time-to-time so make sure you have some spare. And don't touch it! It will get _hot_

Mike Harding

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Follow Up By: Lanceo1 - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 14:16

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 14:16
Thanks again
Yes I had heard the tip about using new rods very recently. Rods come in 2mm, 2.5mm and 3.25mm. Larger rods need more current to get the burn rate consistant without sticking all the time , hence my question, I wasn't sure what current the batteries can deliver in terms of a steady current without flattening the batteries in a couple of minutes. Anyway from your comments it sounds like you may have been using 3.25mm rods so I will buy some and do some practice.
Regards
Lance
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Reply By: Peter 2 - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 14:51

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 14:51
Do a search there has been a few discussions on this subject before.
I usually carry a glass from the goggles, several different sorts of rods, GP, hydrogen for springs etc.
To make a bush helmet use half a slab carton, fits well and pivots on your ears with the lens taped into a cutout on one end, leaves hands free to work with.
For those that have seen the fella welding aluminium cans at the shows with his alloy rods and the porta gas they work really well for emergency repairs.
I've welded alternator brackets, alloy power steering lines, thermostat housing and repaired (blocked anyway) holes in alloy radiators with them.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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AnswerID: 107036

Follow Up By: Lanceo1 - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 17:53

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 17:53
Thanks Peter
Some very good ideas. I had forgotten all about the Aluminum welding and I have a few rods in the workshop.
Lance
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Reply By: Member - Jack - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 16:44

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 16:44
This might help .

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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Follow Up By: Lanceo1 - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 17:54

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 17:54
Thanks Jack
Very useful site. I didn't know it existed.
Lance
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 19:16

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 19:16
Good article Jack, thanks.
Cheers,
Who?
John

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Reply By: Steve - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 20:18

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 20:18
Need to get some more of those 'Show" rods !! anyone got the blokes number, (Sydney?)
AnswerID: 107061

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 21:06

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 21:06
2 batteries is Ok most of the time, but we've had to go 3 batteries once when welding an trailer axle flange.

Used 2.5 mm rods.

You'll get heaps of welding time out of N70 batteries - no probs there.

I take the welding mask, handpiece and rods from home - takes up very little space, and works better than putting a beer carton on your head (but not as funny :-)) and made up some simple leads using battery terminals.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 107063

Reply By: allaussie - Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 23:02

Saturday, Apr 16, 2005 at 23:02
what a laugh???????? i'm a boilermaker .s^*t i have read so far
doing repairs is s easy if you take time to look at the problem... First ascess the problem and then look at it and see how u should repair it .... First off in the bush try and heat thr rods ... rods should be 2.5 or 2.8 or 3mm any big and well????????? your own problem???? cheers chris
AnswerID: 107071

Reply By: Member - RockyOne - Sunday, Apr 17, 2005 at 11:28

Sunday, Apr 17, 2005 at 11:28
On our 1989 Cape York adventure, a rig broke a front spring hanger from chassis.Scotty our leader of Guides To Adventure,welded it back(Permanent) with 3 x 12v batts (on ground) and CIG Weld All rods.WIA Unicord are also a Universal rod.(Unknown metals.s/s to mild steel.Hard to weld steels) Suggest carry rods in plastic conduit with large rubber chair tips ea.end..Force some sponge rubber in to keep them from moving/rubbing)..Batteries actually give a more stable weld arc than a main powered stick welder.Has little effect on good batteries.
AnswerID: 107089

Reply By: brian - Sunday, Apr 17, 2005 at 20:07

Sunday, Apr 17, 2005 at 20:07
Steve the bl;okes number is 0248402017 lavere products taralga nsw hope this helps.
AnswerID: 107142

Reply By: LineB - Monday, Apr 18, 2005 at 15:45

Monday, Apr 18, 2005 at 15:45
Hullo Lanceo1

Try this link for a brief description of successful welding in the bush. Tancred Mueller (left in pics) used his inverter to weld on two jobs in CGGs 35th Anniversary French Line crossing in '98. Don't ask me what the specs of his gear is but I can put you in touch with him. He is in the business.

Kevin M
AnswerID: 107249

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