First Aid Kits

Submitted: Wednesday, Oct 23, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 2213 Views:2800 Replies:15 FollowUps:7
This Thread has been Archived
So what sort do people use..

Ive priced St Johns ones, and needed St Johns to revive me after

Is it worth gettin a tackle box and making your own from a chemist?? Or just lash out for one??

Thanks
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: PETER - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
set up your own - gloves - triangular bandage -note book - pencil - these are musts then add bits and pieces to suit your needs . regards peter
AnswerID: 7812

Reply By: Kev - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
Hi. I found that it worked out around the same price to make up my own first aid kit. The benefit in making your own is that you get the type of kit that suits you best. If 4Wd'ing then you need outback stuff, three triangular bandages, and other things more suitable to a longer period of treatment. I found a couple of those light sticks useful if you get stuck at night .
AnswerID: 7813

Reply By: Mikef_Patrol - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
Hi all

Pay the money and buy the St Johns one (outback one is about $110 I think), then add all extras that you personally need. That way you have the minimum and better.
Remember, no kit will have every situation covered. All we can do is try.

MikeF
AnswerID: 7814

Reply By: Axel +Karen - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
Truckster ,the price of the kits that St Johns sell ,may seem a little steep ,but remember that part of that cost goes towards the running costs of the services they provide ,,that said ,the tackle box approach is a worthwhile exercise and use the money saved on a St Johns first aid course so that the aid kit can be used when required. Karen D.
AnswerID: 7820

Follow Up By: Axel +karen - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
PS, as the actress said to the bishop,' the equipment is of no use if you can not use it '
0
FollowupID: 3620

Reply By: Melissa - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
Hi Truckster, I've found the tackle box approach a must cheaper option. Check your yellow pages for First Aid Suppliers. These are the guys that set-up and re-stock first aid kits in workplaces etc. Our local bloke gave me great advice on what to include in the kit etc and even came to my workplace so I didn't have to go to his outlet. Easy! Generally cheaper than the chemist and St Johns. Even cheaper option for the basics like bandages, slings etc is Woollies, Kmart etc. But, I agree will Axel. Do a first aid course with the money you save. :-)Melissa
AnswerID: 7821

Follow Up By: Melissa - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
Oh, and one other thing Truckster...if you go the tackle box approach, make sure you get a red marker pen and clearly identify the box as a first aid kit 'cause it might not be you who has to find/access it in an emergency situation! Melissa
0
FollowupID: 3621

Follow Up By: Truckster - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
12 yrs in Rural Fire Service, current first aider, showed me the need to label them clearly and on the window of the car where it is stored, the First Aid Sticker for the window and box are only $10..


Any chance of a list of what your locak restocker suggested to carry in one?

Has Exploroz thought of some sort of deal on First Aid Kits to add to your site?? somethin we ALL need to carry.. could be a good thing.
0
FollowupID: 3622

Reply By: Melissa - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
Hi Truckster, It was quite a few years ago that we put our kit together so I don't have a list as such. However, apart from eye wash, antiseptic cream and a sprain bandage, we haven't had to use it much (touch wood). If you can't get a written list from your local stockist drop me a line and I'll look see what's in our kit. gmmkuipers@bigpond.com.au. Regards, Mel.
AnswerID: 7822

Follow Up By: Janset - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
Hi all.
A point to mention. I attended the last 4WD gathering at Tilmouth Wells and while there we had a very informative demonstration by A reptile handler. He went on to say that 4Wd'ers sometimes go to great lengths to set up a first aid kit to include all sorts of goodies but forget the most important item to anyone travelling in the outback, and that is to include at least 2 crepe bandages in the event of a snake bite. Take the tip of an expert and make sure to include.
Regards
0
FollowupID: 3624

Reply By: Melissa - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
Truckster, me again! Go to http://secure.sjaa.com.au/kits/601801.htm which is the St John site showing the Off Road Kit. Scroll down the page to see a list of contents and quantities. I've just glanced over the list and it doesn't seem as extensive as what we carry but then it comes down to personal choice as to what you think you'll need. We have a toddler so we recently added a burn kit to our FAK. :-) Melissa
AnswerID: 7823

Reply By: Lyds - Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Oct 24, 2002 at 00:00
I attended a St Johns First Aid course with my club the other week. My last 1st aid training was some years back, and it is amazing how some of the "best practices" have changed in that time; especially when it comes to treating broken bones, snake bites, etc. Even if you last attended training a few years ago there are enough differences to make a refresher worthwhile. A must for anyone involved with 4WD. St Johns do a great job, buy their kit -- Stuart.
AnswerID: 7832

Reply By: member-skippyking - Friday, Oct 25, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Oct 25, 2002 at 00:00
G'day Truckster, Aust. 4WD Monthly did a comparo on FAK in it's May 2001 issue. It may not be totally relevant now but if you could get hold of a back issue, they rated them and also listed their "ultimate FAK". They admit it may cost upwards of $300 and probably still not have what some folks want but what price your health or even your life? Their 1st prize went to the Accidental First Aid Supp. 4wd kit at $177. 2nd to Responder First Aid's kit called A/B. 3rd to Medilife's kit Medi-Mega. In the budget category, Australian Red Cross got first, Aussie First Aid 2nd and St John Ambulance 3rd. Hope this is some help to you. cya SK
AnswerID: 7864

Reply By: Truckster - Saturday, Oct 26, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Oct 26, 2002 at 00:00
Hi.
I dont hold much value in what most mags say, specially Toyota err 4wd Monthly. Personal reasons, but also have a look at the nice ad that Accidental 4wd supplies has in EVERY 4wd monthly mag.. $$ talks.

Heres some links from Steve Pickering of Qld Patrol club that may help others
http://www.equip.com.au/
http://www.parasolemt.com.au/
http://www.stjohn.org.au/
http://www.alphafirstaid.com.au/
http://www.medilife.com.au/
http://www.firstaid.com.au/
http://www.firstaidkitsqld.com.au/
AnswerID: 7882

Follow Up By: Exploroz Team - David - Saturday, Oct 26, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Oct 26, 2002 at 00:00
Guys, ExplorOz sell all the first aid kits from Equip first aid, we even made their website (mentioned in the link above). We have fully researched this and that's why we provide the Equip products in our hand-selection of goodies in our online shop. All the comments above about kits are good but if you want to buy one the best around is the Equip - they even have one specifically designed for 4WDrivers - pls check it out on the shop on this site.
0
FollowupID: 3654

Follow Up By: Member-skippyking - Sunday, Oct 27, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, Oct 27, 2002 at 00:00
Truckster, can't say I disagree with you on $$ talk. Not regular buyers of fourby mags ourselves, just happened to buy that one out of interest on this subject. We have a St Johns toolbox FAK and like Ranga below find it difficult to use, especially when what you want is at the bottom. We are looking for a soft bag type, with plenty of pockets, to transfer our stuff into. SK
0
FollowupID: 3660

Reply By: ranga - Sunday, Oct 27, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, Oct 27, 2002 at 00:00
Truckster,

I've used the tackle box approach but found it to be cumbersome. I've now opted for the soft fold out pack. There is plenty of room for customising.(more room than a large tackle box) Sure it cost more but it goes to a worthwhile cause. The kit I use is the "First Response Kit" 36cm x 26cm x 16cm deep. Everything from eye wash to splints. Order # 6250. I purchase nine at a 4WD show some time ago it cost in the order of #200.00.

St John Ambulance Australia. 13 13 94

By the way the most I've used it for was to remove a splinter(My supplied needle) and strap as sprained ankle.

Tom
AnswerID: 7893

Reply By: truckster - Sunday, Oct 27, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, Oct 27, 2002 at 00:00
I currently have the Trafalgar Kit in this link which I will put in the wifes car for her use...http://www.firstaid.com.au/prod267.htm .
It doesnt have enough in it I dont think, adn would like the softpack style too.

Those links above have some good softpaks in them, but the prices are insane, $200+? I think Im from that show Sliders, and slid into the wrong world, this ones expensive as hell!

Call me jewish, but I could get a backpack from one of them cheap shops for ~$10-20 and that leaves me $180 for supplies and Im sure I could stock it for less than $100, inc getting wife to sew some more pockets into it.

Am I wrong about the price, yea know the old one about "its the price you put on your family etc etc", or just go out and get the softpack kit?
EG
THE MULTIPURPOSE KIT
http://www.medilife.com.au/first_aid_kits.htm $145
Kit - First Aid Remote Soft Pack
http://www.parasolemt.com.au/shop/prod220.htm $188
Tractor Kit (Pouch)
http://www.stjohnnsw.com.au/kits/shop/result.asp?id=9 $209
Equip E5 kit
http://www.equip.com.au/Products/e5.asp $266!
EquipE6
http://www.equip.com.au/Products/e6.asp $357!!!
AnswerID: 7904

Reply By: JackJones - Sunday, Oct 27, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, Oct 27, 2002 at 00:00
About first aid/medical kits for off-roaders and remote area travellers ...

I believe that anyone who has some training and common sense can make do with a relatively small kit. Improvisation and adaptability is the key to success here.

Then again as my Pop frequently tells me, common sense isn't as common as it once was. (smile)

For example did you know that:
a. Betadine ('Viodine' is an equivelant brand name) swabs can not only be used as an antiseptic, but they can also be used to treat tinea and sore throats?

b. The cotton filling of a combine pad can be used as emergency tinder for fire lighting?

c. A triangular bandage's weave makes an excellent particle strainer when collecting water?

d. Normal saline (0.9% sodium chloride) is superior to chlorhexadine as a first aid solution. Normal saline can be used for all types of irrigation (wound, ear, eye, mouthwash), while chlorhexadine can only be used for wound irrigation.

Personally, I've got a small kit (soft pouch) containing some bandages, tapes, simple dressing material and some medication of my choice (paracetamol, promethazine, salbutamol, pseudoephedrine).

On a related issue: If venture out into remote areas or visit outback towns consider taking along a letter from your GP detailing your medical history and any medication which you are on (or have been on recently). This will help give accurate information to any health providers which you may ask for assistance during your trip.

Jack
AnswerID: 7911

Reply By: bruce - Monday, Oct 28, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Oct 28, 2002 at 01:00
truckster mate do a first aid course ,then purchase the kit most siutable
to where you are going, ie the further from help the better the kit. just as important is to make sure all those traviling with you know how to use it & where it is stored in your vehicle just in case it is you who it needs to be used on,also remember that even the best kit and the most trained first aider are totally useless if you can not contact out side help.
st john in some states offer a discount on all their kits to those who have completed course & will advise on what you need to carry, rember to age relate your kit to suit those traviling
best of luck bruce
AnswerID: 7915

Follow Up By: Truckster - Monday, Oct 28, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Oct 28, 2002 at 01:00
Im currently a certified first aider....
Did my courses thru the NSW Rural Fire Service when with them.
I emailed most of those first aid places today to see what they recommend for 4wding and camping with the terrain, time limits, and the 3 people I have in the car. Also mentioned to them that we are sometimes with other cars, that may or may not carry first aid kit.

thanks anyway.
0
FollowupID: 3668

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Monday, Oct 28, 2002 at 01:00

Monday, Oct 28, 2002 at 01:00
I do agree that if you don't want to pay for the ready-made kits from Equip (or wherever) then the next option is to build your own.In fact I must admit that that's what we do, although I recently did a refresher First Aid course (I do them every 2 yrs) and bought a dedicated car kit (focuses on treating major burns and massive bleeding and contains some new products for treating burns that are not available in Australia. The course lecturer is from South Africa and imports them, he is also a paramedic and drives a Perth ambulance). I also bought some of his burn stuff to put in my house.However, in all my travels I have never had to use more than panadol and splinter probes!One thing I do think is important is the placement of your kit(s). I actually carry 2 - 3 kits. One is the kids kit (I have specific kids medicines in here and it is placed on the step just inside the rear car door beneath the baby car seat). Contents are listed in the Travelling with Kids page under the Preparation heading. The "car kit" is placed in the overhead console and contains the blood and burns stuff. A third kit is more extensive and if taking a trailer is packed in there. It contains things that would be used if the accident was likely to happen when you were stopped and had time to get really organised such as first aid after a fall.To my mind you need to have easy access to life-threatening first aid treatments so consider that the trailer will need its own kit so that people left at camp are not left without if the driver goes off in the vehicle.
AnswerID: 7934

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)