Camp Oven Thingies..........

Submitted: Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 20:37
ThreadID: 22395 Views:3965 Replies:13 FollowUps:45
This Thread has been Archived
Looking at getting a camp oven.

Any ideas of brands to go for...or avoid.

Any comments welcome.

Ozman
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Jack - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 20:51

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 20:51
Hi Ozman:

I have both a spun steel one and a cheaper cast iron one. I prefer the spun steel one because of its lighter weight, it is capable of handling a few knocks, and the one I have, which I bought from has a few optional extras now that I like, such as a trivet (so as to avoid burning your food on the bottom), an aluminium ring insert to cook veggies, and also a steel grid that sits on the lid so that I can heat up water while the oven is cooking. The lid has a rim to put coals, and double as a frying pan if needed.

If I was going for a cast iron one I know that Furphy have a good reputation built up over many, many decades. Heavy as lead, but those that have them swear by them. It is obviously also an excellent product.

Others will have other suggestions.

No matter what you choose, you can't beat a roast leg of lamb or pork out of one of these things. Enjoy whatever you choose.

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 108308

Follow Up By: silverback - Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 17:44

Sunday, May 01, 2005 at 17:44
Tried the camp ovens lots of mucking around. If you want the ultimate i say go for the cobb cooker, much better,cleaner, and easer to use and also not as many burnt meals
0
FollowupID: 365794

Reply By: Member - Jack - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 20:54

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 20:54
aaarrgghhhh!!!

Really stuffed the links up ....

This links to the Hillbilly site.

This one links to Furphy

Sorry 'bout that ...

Jack
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 108310

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:50

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:50
No......don't get a Hillbilly.......I got one and there is too many options including the ability to run on gas.......Damn thing cost me a fortune,
Bloody good though!!!
Don't use the cast iron one anymore.
Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 365094

Follow Up By: Redback - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 07:35

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 07:35
Yep a Hillbilly they are great i also have a cast iron one but it is only used for damper, breads, deserts ect ect this is a good tip, cook your breads and meats seperate ovens !!

Baz.
0
FollowupID: 365126

Follow Up By: flappa - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 08:53

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 08:53
Know that I bought my Steel Hillbilly , I dont even carry the cast iron one anymore.

I would certainly recommend one.

I got mine from a camping show , so I bought the "pack" that included the large oven, lid, handle, trivet , and canvas bag. Cost me $100 , individually was closer to $140.
0
FollowupID: 365132

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 09:04

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 09:04
Baz, when you say "cook your breads and meats seperate ovens" do you mean for the life of the oven or just cooking them at the same time. Just like to get Kerry's or Venessa's advice. LOL

You and I would be trying to learn how to get something to bite the baited thing on the end of a line as we suck on somthing with a dark or amber liquid in it.
Cheers,
Who?
John

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 365137

Reply By: Brew69(SA) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:21

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:21
I can't fault my bedourie....the fryingpan lid gets a hammering for brekkies or just cooking snags,chops etc. However i will be investing in a cast iron one as well very soon as they cook more even and don't heat up with hot spots as easily. There is a need for both imo.
AnswerID: 108318

Follow Up By: Casnat - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:59

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:59
the 'dourie has my vote also. I use it for everything. And they are not that expensive.
Has anyone else noticed that carrots particularly taste spectacular in a camp oven?
0
FollowupID: 365087

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 07:24

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 07:24
Have a Bedourie and also a cast iron one for the armoury but prefer to use a good pan for brekkie or frying. Have a pic of a roast from last weekend in the pics with the Rig Pic. Unfortunately the veggies tend to not brown and crisp when cooked with the meat but are scumptious. Hadn't had the garlic in long enough but I still ate over half a round. Yummm

For the crackling on the pork I made sure the skin faced the hotter side of the oven. Yes, I did !, and had that facing the fire at close quarters. Coals over that part of the oven.

Agree with Brew about needing both but the spun steel is good and is a lot lighter.
Cheers,
Who?
John

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 365123

Reply By: Diamond (Vic) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:21

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:21
camp ovens yummmoooo.
since our trip away with glenn/jimbo/toonies and the als all i can now think about is whens the next weekend away so we can have a camp oven roast.
well i didnt have to wait to long murry sunset again the als and glenn just do the best roast.
but wait theres more.
the weekend just gone we went away with jimbo and glenn and you know what.
you guesed it roast lambs sat night and roast lamb and chicken sunday night.
thanks glenn/jimbo/tabby/snapper.
any way to get to your point.
we had 3 diferent camp ovens going.
glenn and the als have a cast iron one bought from a 4by show.
not sure of the type jimbo uses.(his is also cast)
and i have a 9 yearold one bought from aussie disposals for around $25.
all of the above performed sensational.
forgot to mention we also went away 2 weeks ago and after our recent camp oven meals we decided to find our old one(one we now using)it hadnt been used for at least 5 years probly more and ws so dirty and full of rust i thought geez might have to throw it away.after a little bit of burning and cleaning and oiling over a couple of nights it was ready to cook the best beef ive had in ages(im just saying that coz i cooked lol)
ive nevr used spun steel ect but for what ive eaten in the last few months i would recomend cast.
my tip for cleaning the oven.
(1)cook the meal and leave camp oven lying around while you enjoy.
(2)half fill camp oven with some plain water.
(3)place on top of fire for 15 or so minutes(or untill water starts to boil)
(4)pull off fire and using scrubbing brush with right hand(leaves one hand free for beer ect) swirl and scrub and clean for 5-10 minutes(swap hands if left handed will still work)
(5)empty dirty water and add some dishwashing liquid and a small amount of water.
(6)same as (4) except for the taking of the fire bit.
(7)get a friend or fellow camper(thanks snapper)to take oven to river and rinse all the detergent out.
(8)place emptied but wet oven back on fire to dry our all excess water.
(9)once dry pull off the fire and re oil for the next nights feast.
cheers
AnswerID: 108319

Follow Up By: Diamond (Vic) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:29

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:29
i forgot to mention i will not be held liable for any of the following.
(1)only roughly knowing how long things have been on the fire cooking for.
(2)tripping over things around the fire while taking oven off.
(3)burning scourer while doing first clean.
(4)tripping over walking to the river for detergent clean off.
(5)burning fingers while doing the oiling.
ps all of the above can be avoided with the moderate consumption of bourby.
cheers
0
FollowupID: 365078

Follow Up By: geocacher (djcache) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:47

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 21:47
Tend to agree with most of the above except the bit about the detergent. I was always told this was the big DON'T of cast camp ovens. Apparently the detergent removes the protective coating that using and oiling develops and promotes rusting.

I'm positive the instructions I got with mine said "Don't use detergent" too.

I've got a cast oven and have never used detergent. I carry an old scrubbing brush with a flat end on it for scraping, and it is disgusting but lives in the campoven bag. I have always just put water in it. Boiled it, scrubbed it/scraped it and wiped it out with a rag or newspaper and reoiled it.

If you are too crissed as a picket to clean it on the last night or on a one nighter it's about the only thing I've ever used the wok burner on the BBQ for - cleaning the camp oven.

As a foot note I've heard of people who are too desperate for a CO Roast who've used heat beads in a hole in the back yard to good effect. Buggers the lawn though....best just to go camping.

Dave
0
FollowupID: 365086

Follow Up By: D-Jack - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 00:20

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 00:20
Yeh Diamond

Most detergents contain sodium something or other (salt chemical) and therefore also add to the rusting of the iron. If u can avoid it will minimise the rust.

D-Jack
0
FollowupID: 365111

Follow Up By: Glenn (VIC) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 11:07

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 11:07
The major reason for not using detergent is that as the pot is hot, the pores are open and the soap gets into the pores. Pot cools down, pores close, soap still in pores. Pot heated up again for next meal, pores open and out comes soap.

Now I have yet to have a soapy taste in any meal I have cooked in camp oven, nor have any of my camp ovens rusted, then again, I always oil mine after they have been cleaned and whilst still hot so that the oil soaks into the above mentioned pores.

Cheers

Glenn
0
FollowupID: 365151

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 16:41

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 16:41
I agree with item (1) then ........
Simply put upside down on the fire until the oven glows red hot leave it for a while, then take it off & let it cool down naturally. After that just a light brush out & a little oil.
0
FollowupID: 365183

Follow Up By: Member - Browny (VIC) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 20:21

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 20:21
Diamond,

Thanks for the tips, but can I just say from an old fisho's perspective please bring a bucket of water from the creek to rinse out your CO don't rinse it out "in" the river every bit helps..:-)

Cheers Browny
0
FollowupID: 365215

Reply By: Grumblebum and Dragon (WA) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:16

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:16
The big "dont" has nothing to do with camp ovens and everything to do with putting detergent into our rivers. Clean up your act please so we can all enjoy the rivers into the future.

GB

AnswerID: 108336

Follow Up By: Diamond (Vic) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:57

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:57
i can now see why you get the name grumble bum.
its now the year 2000+ and theres such a thing as enviromentaly friendly detergents.
now next time your driving to the river so as to enjoy its beauty just remember be it petrol od diesal im sure your doing more inviromental damage than a little squirt of e/f detergent is.
now go away and build your self a bride over the river and .... get over it.
pita
0
FollowupID: 365099

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 07:35

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 07:35
GB agree with the "no detergents" as they penetrate and remove the oils we are trying to keep in the pores of the metal. Had just hot water in ours since we learnt how to use it properly.

No matter how hard people like detergent, fish can't breathe in it and we need to try to minimise nutrient loadings, even small amounts. There are nutrients like phosphorus in it. Good for plants which can use it, not for fish.

I guess diamond you were building a bridge rather than a bride (mrs diamond) which you have. LOL
Cheers,
Who?
John

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 365125

Follow Up By: Al & Mrs Al (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 08:05

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 08:05
Jim, I think too, it's need to be pointed out that we've never tipped dirty water containing detergents into the waterways.
0
FollowupID: 365128

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 16:51

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 16:51
A little squirt of detergent does nothing compared to what industry does to our lower waterways to keep us in luxury. Maybe we should all be living in tents with no electricty or mod cons. Even the solar panel is responsible for pollution in it's production. Stop those coal fired power stations, stop air travel, give up our vehicles.....blah humbug...who is without sin regarding the enviroment?...speak up now, or shut up for ever.
0
FollowupID: 365185

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 16:58

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 16:58
Just what I though nobody. :)
0
FollowupID: 365187

Follow Up By: Diamond (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 18:30

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 18:30
exactly mad dog.
0
FollowupID: 365200

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 20:49

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 20:49
I was a witness to this heinous crime on humanity.

It involved boiling water in the camp ovens and emptying. Then adding more water and detergent and boiling again. Then a quick scrub, empty out the contents and sloosh with fresh water. Then, when there was nothing in them, Snapper gave them a rinse in the river to freshen them up.

If, and I say if, there was any detergent left it wouldn't have been enough to wet a cotton bud.

Fair dinkhum Grumblebum, haven't you got more to worry about? Why aren't you driving a Prius (or Pirius or whatever it is called) to make your concerted contribution to the ecology; or better still why aren't you riding a push bike?

Ray (Mad Dog) summed it up very well.

Cheers,

Jim.
0
FollowupID: 365225

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 00:06

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 00:06
Don't know what gets into you guys there Jims both and Ray. The reason that industry is having to get it's act together is to meet targets and get fish swimming back in rivers. Just look at the sewerage in the Yarra now and the disease that has been caught there in the past few years.

Jimbo when you learn about your camp oven you may find that wet sand is better than detergents too as an abrasive without having to re-oil it again. You are talking crap about the amount of detergent. Yes mate I get on my bike too though, for a fitness push rather than the ecology

Ray is only out for a troll and you didn't realise how right he was though about the energy used to make the solar panels you get so rapt in. Ray is right that one squirt doesn't do too much but when all the house cleaners and dishwashers get together. Why would you add to the problem when you have no need to? The Yarra Valley outer East dump it with their septic pollution stright into Melbourne's Yarra because the government is too gutless to get the voters clean up their act. Then the Minister tries to tell us the river is clean. He must get his stories from you Jimbo. Jimbo Spin it's called. LOL

Ray, I don't have the time to sit by the 'puter all day mate on EO, but I notice there was only seven minutes between your self justifying second posting which the two Jims reckon allowed enough time for others to come back. Next time we have a beer I will offer you guys a glass with some detergent in it to make sure you know you can enjoy it. LOL I have ingested some in rivers and it isn't nice.

Come on mate, the whole story was about keeping the camp oven in good condition and if you want to put detergent in it plants really do appreciate the nutirents like phosphorus, one of the major nutrients in detergents. We buy it by the tonne to make the grass grow. There is no need to put it in the creek.
Cheers,
Who?
John

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 365265

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 18:03

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 18:03
Geez John,

That's all a bit strong.

Grumblebum effectively called Jim (Diamond) an environmental terrorist and I simply put forward the facts, as I was there and saw what happened.

Then you say to me "You are talking crap about the amount of detergent". You're effectively calling me a liar. How can you make such a statement when you weren't even there? This outburst is quite out of character for you. I don't understand.

Cheers,

Jim.
0
FollowupID: 365400

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 21:03

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 21:03
Im with Ray and Jim on this one.

More crap oil, fuel, grease, and poisons come off your truck when you cross a river, than washing a camp oven, and all your plates once.

some people need to seek www.iliveinaperfectworldwithnothingwrongandpleasepleasecloseeverythingnowfortheFUTUREsoitdoesntgetruined.org.il
0
FollowupID: 365447

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 21:26

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 21:26
Very true Bruce.

A fingernail full of detergent versus all the road grime from your tires, the grease from your undercarriage, the oil from your engine or even the soap residue left on your car from the last time you washed it.
0
FollowupID: 365452

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 21:34

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 21:34
John, nobody condones the wholesale dumping of detergents in waterways but coming down on someone for washing out his camp oven with a bit of detergent was a bit much to handle. Waterways do not like an over supply of phospate, it causes problems such as harmfull algae blooms
but you probably know that. I dare say some runoff from that stuff that makes the grass grow ends up in our waterways as well and then there's the posioning of our rivers with fire retardants....oh well we wont go there
Cheers mate
0
FollowupID: 365455

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:10

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:10
Hi Jimbo, I think you have escalated what GB said - your term "environmental vandal". I hope people can always be guided to put the nutients on the plants rather then the creek. Hardly wet a cotton bud was an interesting claim.

I agree with Bruce about the propensity of vehicular pollutants, but where it actually wets the truck there is a lower concentration than when the water levels are low north of the divide currently.

Ray, there is certainly a potential, but I saw the surveys of the Tamar River in Tassie that show more P flows from the native forests than had been given credit for. It surprised me actually.

Cheers mate
Cheers,
Who?
John

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 365465

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:25

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:25
John My Friend,

I said a "cotton bud" full because that was all it was, if not, less. You weren't there. You didn't see it.

Accordingly your suggestion that I was talking crap is unfair and unreasonable. I'll reiterate, you weren't there.

Why such hard judgement against me?

Cheers Mate,

Jim.
0
FollowupID: 365470

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:33

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:33
Jimbo, I apologise. I guess you have got more than your own back though painting me as a general do-gooder. Some would say that is a laugh mate.

Next shout is on me if you will have one.
Cheers,
Who?
John

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 365473

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:38

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:38
I have started a survey

I have poured in to a river 1 cap full of diamonds detergent.
into another river I have poured in 400,000ltrs of crude oil

I will be monitoring them closely.

I will let you all know my results in 50 yrs time.
0
FollowupID: 365474

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Friday, Apr 29, 2005 at 07:35

Friday, Apr 29, 2005 at 07:35
Cheers John,

Didn't mean you any offence either.

Looking forward to that beer.

Jim.
0
FollowupID: 365492

Reply By: Member - iMusty (VIC) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:48

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:48
Cast is good.

BUT! The main thing with an oven is being willing to use it. It is very tempting to have one but not use it. I don't know why people do this ... but they do.

Cooking on an open fire is not hard but it is also not easy, unless you do it a few times and are prepared to burn food to learn.

So, if you are not prepared to cook on an open fire in your own backyard to learn how to use it effectively, DONT GET ONE.

If you don't already know how to cook in an conventional oven (the one in your kitchen) DONT GET ONE.

If you want it to be an easy (she'll be right) task DONT GET ONE.

My advice is to get a large Camp Oven. They are not much dearer and you can fit more food in them. In essense you can cook more different foods.
Get one you can fit a large roast in. A roast is a rewarding meal to cook. It's fairly easy and after you've done a few you will be more confident to experiment with other favorite meals you like.

I try to cook in the oven meals that I have cooked at home already. You of course don't have to do this BUT I found that I could make my learning mistakes with each recipe at home under normal light conditions with electricity and Dial'A'Pizza as a backup. Lol.

Good cooking

iMusty

AnswerID: 108345

Follow Up By: Diamond (Vic) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:59

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 22:59
i have to agree to disagree here mate.
i dont do any cooking at home but me thinks i can now cook in a c/o.
when we go away soon you will have to come and see for your self. lol
cheers
0
FollowupID: 365101

Follow Up By: BenSpoon - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 10:40

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 10:40
"If you want it to be an easy (she'll be right) task DONT GET ONE. "

I dont know about that.... bung the oven in some coals, let it heat.
bung the meat in the oven, let it cook. By the time the smell from the oven is that strong you cant keep your mates away from the fire, its time to serve.

I'll never go back to spaghetti bog again!
I reckon the only cooking tools you really need are the oven, a bbq plate (doubles as a jacking base) and a pair of pliers and tongs.
0
FollowupID: 365146

Reply By: Member - Bernie. (Vic) - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 23:04

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 23:04
Hi Ozman,
A good cast iron one is the best must have indented lid so you can put coals on the top or you would need to make a ring to sit on the top to hold some coals, seen some good cast ones but for the price you pay for a "Furpy" I would only use it at home.
A "Bedourie" or light metal spun oven is better if you are touring & what Brew said re the lid.

What ever type you get it will need to be well seasoned before use, I have never had to attack a camp oven with a scrubbing brush.

And NEVER EVER use detergent.

Cheers
AnswerID: 108352

Follow Up By: geocacher (djcache) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 00:34

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 00:34
Attack is pretty strong. A cheap dishwashing brush and boiling water breaks up the crusty bits left from the roast quite well. Takes bugger all time.

Dave
0
FollowupID: 365113

Reply By: derraux - Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 23:56

Tuesday, Apr 26, 2005 at 23:56
Ozman
There are lots of differnet brand camp ovens out there ranging in different quality and materials all of these will cook and some people would not know the difference between oven cooked side by side and lots that could, my advise is work out what you plan on doing with it the most and what your budget is and how much you will use it there is no point having a really expensive oven if you may use it once a year maybee, the difference in cast one's is the quality and thickness of the cast, furphy oven are a higher quality pig iron than the chinese copy, give it a tap you can hear the difference in the ring, not shure about the difference in the spun steel one's a little more versatile ie being able to use lid as frypan. As long as you alter your cooking to suit oven they are all great you can cook lots of different things in them including cakes.
Regard
Derraux
AnswerID: 108360

Follow Up By: geocacher (djcache) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 00:36

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 00:36
Mmmmm. Luxoluk's dump cake....

These will be sorely missed on the Canning Leigh. Why aren't you coming again?? What will we do for desert???

Your map disks are copied. Email me your address.

Dave
0
FollowupID: 365114

Follow Up By: Member - Luxoluk - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 20:48

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 20:48
Hi Dave

Yeah....wish I was going with you guys but atleast you will travel with my Furphy camp oven. Agree with you on cleaning technique...although there is so much bs floating around at present I am not getting involved at any level. I will email you my address tomorrow when at work. No news on the 9323 as yet....damm!! Happy travels Dave....you lucky B!
Cheers
0
FollowupID: 365439

Reply By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 06:20

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 06:20
Ozman,

I've got a 9 litre cast iron job that I bought for about $25, fifteen years ago. Still going strong and the same type is still available from Aussie Disposals.

Once well seasoned, detergent will do them no harm; it's an urban myth.

Cheers,

Jim.
AnswerID: 108377

Follow Up By: Diamond (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 18:28

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 18:28
sounds like a job for myth busters.
cheers
0
FollowupID: 365198

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 20:59

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 20:59
And some of the self righteous crap above is a good case for a show called wank busters.
0
FollowupID: 365227

Reply By: Member - bushfix - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 07:04

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 07:04
G'day,

the COI brand from KMart or Boots or All Camping Supplies etc. are fine. Great value and good design. Excellent deep welled lid for holding ash or coals, especially when lifting the lid. Practise in your back yard if you like, you will like!
Get or make a trivet to hold food off the bottom of the oven and it can also allow a roast to pool juice for the gravy......oh
AnswerID: 108378

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 16:53

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 16:53
I agree .... COI are excellent value for money, we clean ours by putting on the fire until it glows red hot, then just brush it, so the cast iron must be OK in them!
0
FollowupID: 365186

Reply By: Mike - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 09:55

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 09:55
As most others have said, both are good. My old cast oven must be 15 years old now and has a "character" chip off the lid rim, but works beautifully. I use detergent to no ill-effect, but most times we leave them full of water overnight and they come clean easily. Most important to dry them thouroughly after you've cleaned them and oil immediately.

Now the reciepe. In the bedourie, (because it's larger) on a trivet, place a whole piece of rump (size depends on how many you are feeding) sliced open and stuffed with oysters. Pin the meat closed with skewers or kebab sticks. Rub garlic salt into it and pour a little cooking oil over the meat. Dig a hole deep eneough to bury the oven and place a layer of coals in the bottom. Insert the oven and surround it/coverit with good coals, then completely cover the lot with dirt/sand. Cook for about 1 1/2 - 2 hours. In your other oven, on a trivet, place potatoes, carrots, onions, pumpkin and any other vegies you like. Pour a little cooking oil over and place in a hole the same as the other, but only cook for about 45 mins. Time of cooking of course depends on the load in the oven and if you are only cooking for 2, then cook them together, but you will need to uncover the oven to put the vegies on, or they will turn to mush, if you cook them as long as the meat. If you do this then you should replace the coals when you have added the vegies. If you can cook the lot together, the flavour really goes into the vegies, but either way the meal is superb. Add peas or beans just cooked in a pot on the fire. You can also add gravy.

I fed a cast of 12 last June with this repast and all agreed it was delicious.

As you can see we don't always "rough" it when we canp.

Happy (cooking) trails, Mike.
AnswerID: 108399

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 17:43

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 17:43
I often have trouble with my camp oven (Bedourie) in the High Country. It seems much of the wood up there is of a lighter type and does not produce good coals so I usually end up either undercooking things or replacing the coals twice an hour or more. As Mike, above, has suggested I bury the oven with coals on the bottom and top and then a layer of dirt but it doesn't improve matters. When I camp on the Murray in NW Vic the wood is from the River Red Gums and produces wonderful coals and me and the camp oven get on well - any suggestions anyone? I'm thinking of giving up taking it to the High Country.

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 365189

Follow Up By: Mike - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 18:06

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 18:06
Mike, Try putting some heat beads in with the coals. Should work.

Happy trails, Mike.
0
FollowupID: 365193

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 22:04

Wednesday, Apr 27, 2005 at 22:04
Or.....wait for it.......use a Cobb Cooker.

I wont take back what I said above about the Camp Ovens, even though I cheat at times and use the gas ring attachment.

But I am almost a convert to the Cobb. Cooked a superb chunk of Pork using 7 heat beads in 1 1/2 hours at Skytrek last weekend.

Only thing I haven't tried yet is a loaf of bread. Usually put the dough in a "bread tin" and place in the Hillbilly. Crusty on the outside and sooo good it's usually eaten before it has cooled down.

Ahhhh! What people are missing out on when they don't go camping.
But then again........they wouldn't know would they???

Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 365246

Follow Up By: Wombat - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 12:09

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 12:09
What we do is sit our camp oven on the Cobb pot stand with a trivet in it, and with the use of six heatbeads cook the most delectable beef topside roast in cream of mushroom and French onion soup (Sunday) or roast pork with vegetables (Anzac Day).
0
FollowupID: 365309

Follow Up By: Moggs - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 16:37

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 16:37
Mike Harding - are you heating the oven up over the fire prior to putting the coals under and on top? You need the oven piping hot or all the heat goes out of the coals just getting the camp oven up to temperature. Just a thought as I have seen some struggle to cook anything in a camp oven when starting it off cold.
0
FollowupID: 365383

Follow Up By: flappa - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 16:40

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 16:40
I use heat beads when questionable wood is around
0
FollowupID: 365384

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 17:45

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 17:45
Hits self on forehead with heel of hand!

Thanks Moggs. Damn good point - no I'm not and I can quite appreciate that the energy needed to raise 2.5kg of steel from 20 deg C to 150+ deg C is considerable and will certainly suck a lot of juice from the coals before they even have a chance to start cooking the food. I'll do that the next time I'm up there. Only been 3 weeks since I came back but I'm itching to get up there again :(

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 365397

Reply By: Shaker - Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:31

Thursday, Apr 28, 2005 at 22:31
We have never had a problem getting good coals from Vic High Country timber!
AnswerID: 108706

Reply By: Member - Banjo (SA) - Friday, Apr 29, 2005 at 19:25

Friday, Apr 29, 2005 at 19:25
Didn't read all that guff but.....
In my view, spun steel is best because it cooks well and is light. The cast jobs would be superior for cooking but they weigh a ton ! I have a Bedourie steel, but a friend's Hillbilly is a cut above that ! A very good unit. With steel ovens, being thin they require heat control. Once you get the hang of learning how many coals NOT to put under and over (too much heat is the main problem), you will be away - I have witnesssed people cooking cakes in them - heat control is the main skill. Once you have a nice bed of coals in the main fire to draw from, you set your oven up off to the side in its own little place and you are away - every 15 minutes, just check and adjust the heat. As others may have said, there are crook, and good woods - river redgum is good because the coals seem to produce even hear that lasts - some woods lose their heat as soon as you use the coals. Mmmmmm... I can smel that lamb roast and vegies now - had some last week in the Hattah Kulkyne Nat. Park !
AnswerID: 108835

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)