Chainsaws in National Parks NSW

Submitted: Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 10:36
ThreadID: 22639 Views:5614 Replies:8 FollowUps:13
This Thread has been Archived
It is "common knowledge" that you aren't allowed to carry (let alone use) chainsaws into National Parks in NSW.

However, try as I might I cannot find anything on the http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/ site that mentions anything about carrying or using chainsaws in Parks.

Can anyone point me to the relevant Act or Regulation that covers this.

Cheers

Buggerlux
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 10:37

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 10:37
Call the parks and ask them for the info :)
AnswerID: 109589

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 15:07

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 15:07
wouldnt that be about as usefull as asking the local copper the gun regs? ie get it made up as they go along
0
FollowupID: 366221

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:25

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:25
You then ask them to post it to you on Parks letter head and your covered
0
FollowupID: 366304

Reply By: cokeaddict - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 11:44

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 11:44
Buggerlux,
I was told a similar thing with a slight twist.
I was told that chainsaws are NOT allowed to be used in National Parks. BUT i was also told that you can carry one with you IF you take the chain and bar off before you enter the National Park.

This seems to be a reasonable call to me as i have had a few occasions when a fallen tree has stopped me from continuing on my way. On those occasions i had to hook up the chainsaw and cut just enough off the fallen tree to get through, cleaning up the mess before i move on.

Personally i would never take a trip (when travelling alone) without my chainsaw.
Its common sence to me to have one. Using it is another issue. But i will always carry one no matter what the laws are. Its a matter of survival sometimes and no law will stop me from living.
Angelo
AnswerID: 109597

Follow Up By: ChrisB - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 12:03

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 12:03
What is the point of taking the chain off?
0
FollowupID: 366196

Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 12:08

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 12:08
Exactly my question Chris ! It was explained to me that if you were pulled over or checked for any reason, it shows you are not intending on using it...yeh i know...its stupid but so are those who make the rules.
0
FollowupID: 366197

Follow Up By: Utemad - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 22:48

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 22:48
I am sure this used to be the case in Qld NPs but I have just searched the Nature Conservation Act and the regulations and cannot find any mention of chainsaws.

I assume it has been removed as I am sure it was in there last year.
0
FollowupID: 366298

Follow Up By: Nudenut - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 12:29

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 12:29
if you take the chain off..is it still a chain saw?
0
FollowupID: 366368

Follow Up By: Utemad - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 16:30

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 16:30
Depends on how carefully you remove the chain. It might become a chain sore.
0
FollowupID: 366418

Reply By: Jodi - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 16:00

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 16:00
Gotta love regulations. We all try to do the right thing, but how on earth are you supposed to travel for weeks on end to several lovely places and leave your chainsaw somewhere as you enter a NP??? Do they have a holding bay so you can pick it up again on your way back out to your next destination??

I spoke to a ranger in Vic last year about chainsaws. He told me that generally they're not going to bother too much if you have one in your car, but if you have half the NP piled up in neatly cut logs in your campsite you might have a few problems. I guess at the end of the day it comes down to common sense.
AnswerID: 109629

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:28

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 18:28
Whilst looking for some other info. recently I came across a passage (on a government web site) which said you were permitted to carry a chain saw in an NP but not to use it. Can't remember the web site though.

A few months ago I called the DSE here in Vic and got put through to the Omeo office (I think it was?) for some info on the condition of a particular track through an NP. The very helpful lady ranger told me the track was OK but I should take a saw or axe because she thought some recent high winds may have felled some trees in the area. I replied that I would be taking my chainsaw and she commented that was even better. I suspect as Jodi says it's a common sense thing

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 366249

Reply By: TheUndertaker - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:11

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:11
Bit like the common knowledge on carrying/using a generator ,common sense is not common or even reliable any more.
AnswerID: 109674

Reply By: Wayne (NSW) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:56

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 19:56
Funny thing about National Parks, they say that you must not leave the track to go around a fallen tree and then say that you can't take a chainsaw to clear the fallen tree. What do we do wait till the tree rots?

Unlike the National Park in NSW common sense must prevail, use a chain saw or any other tree cutting imperilment with safety to clear a fallen tree and be on your way.

As for cutting fire wood I look at it as hazard reduction. The timber I burn at a camp fire is less timber to burn in a bush fire. As for animals living in the wood I collect, have not seen any, they must be off the side of the road a lot further than I am willing to walk to get timber, as any self respecting animal would be.

Wayne
AnswerID: 109683

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 20:13

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 20:13
I recently considered the impact of the wood I burn in my camp fires on the forest and it’s animal/insect inhabitants (not the greenhouse effect I admit - but I suspect the China Electricity Corp makes my camp fires pale into insignificance) and I reckon I might burn the equivalent of 3 or 4 medium sized gum trees on camp fires throughout my lifetime. I did this calculation when I was in the bush - and then I looked around at the countless acres of trees surrounding me and decided I wasn't going to do too much damage :)

I wonder how many trees it takes to construct the average Australian house?

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 366277

Follow Up By: Jodi - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 08:53

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 08:53
Me again. When chatting with the ranger in Vic last year about chainsaws, we also discussed fire wood collection. Again he told me it's a common sense thing. If you're camping in an area that gets a lot of use, they don't like timber collection as it just destroys the natural balance of the forest once it's cleared by campers. However if you venture further in and get what you need for the night they tend to let it pass as it helps to reduce undergrowth and fuel. That said, they still don't like to see massive piles of felled forest piled up in the camp sites. Although I'm still very cautious about the fire wood collection thing.
0
FollowupID: 366335

Reply By: Tuco - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 20:22

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 20:22
Had to remove the chain and bar from out Stihl when we went through the Simpson desert. Had a ranger come into our camp at 6AM (drove in and got us all out of bed) to check on Desert Parks Passes as well - were told that we could cut firewood with an axe but NOT the chainsaw!
Guy travelling with us on a motorcycle was also told that he had to keep his pass on him - and not in his gear in the vehicle.
NOT impressed with the gestapo attitude!
AnswerID: 109689

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 22:06

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 22:06
Tuco I thought the windscreen sticker was the pass, they couldn't read it stuck to the wallet very well.
Cheers,
Who?
John

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 366293

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:36

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 23:36
Guy travelling with us on a motorcycle was also told that he had to keep his pass on him

he should have eaten it.. There you go hitler, its on me. or stuck it on his arse... you really wanna see my pass Shultz?
0
FollowupID: 366306

Reply By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 22:02

Wednesday, May 04, 2005 at 22:02
If they can't find it, you haven't got it.

Stow it carefully I say.

However, use it responsibly.
AnswerID: 109709

Reply By: flappa - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 09:32

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 09:32
Its happened AGAIN . . . ANOTHER post missing , this is REALLY peeing me off.

There is no actual RULE against chainsaws in Nat Parks.

Its up to Each Minister to determine the status for each Park..

Do a search on the web using . . Chainsaw . . National Park . .

You will see what I mean.

Plenty DO allow chainsaws , equally plenty dont.
AnswerID: 109774

Follow Up By: TheUndertaker - Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 17:45

Thursday, May 05, 2005 at 17:45
flappa,you got it in 1 ,no actual blanket RULE as to chainsaws and gen sets for that matter in nat parks ,each park is different and so require separate rulings ,, try telling people who go to fraser or moreton islands "no genny allowed" ,both nat parks ,both genny necessary ,lol.
0
FollowupID: 366431

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)