Lamb Shanks in the Cobb

Submitted: Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 13:13
ThreadID: 23293 Views:5276 Replies:11 FollowUps:11
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Hello,

Im going to attempt to cook some lamb shanks in my Cobb and am wondering if anyone else has tried this? I have cooked a lamb roast and a pork roast in my Cobb previously and they both turned out great.
However the wife says that lamb shanks take a lot longer than a normal roast when cooking them in an oven, so I figured the same would be true for the Cobb.
Should I add more heat beads or is it just a matter of putting them in a lot earlier than usual and let them cook for 3-4 hours instead of 2 hours for a lamb roast?
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Reply By: motherhen - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 13:23

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 13:23
Never used a Cobb, but your shanks should be cooked slowly, but being smaller, should take no longer than the lamb roast.
AnswerID: 112789

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 13:41

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 13:41
troy,

With about 7-8 heatbeads in the Cobb you should acheive an approximate temperature of 180 degrees C.

When you have cooked a leg, you should have noticed that the amount of heatbead material left, would allow you to cook another one.

So I would think that you just leave the shanks in a little longer, have another glass of red (or whatever your favorite tipple is) an let time go by.

prick the meat now and again and if the juices run clear, you should be done.

P.S. Write down your cooking time so that you can post the appropriate amount oftime it took to cook a "perfect" shank, so the rest of us lazy buggers don't have to do it:-)))

I understand the Cobb Mob are in the process of producing a decent cook book.
Maybe you will be able to contribute your favorites?

By the way, I'm bitten by the Cobb bug as well. Love cooking with it.
Bill


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AnswerID: 112795

Follow Up By: troy35 - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:16

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:16
Thanks Sandman,

I will follow your advice. And if I cook them to perfection I will share the details.
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Reply By: cj - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 13:46

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 13:46
As an aside has anyone tried the new heavy base frypan in their Cobb. Saw one in Anaconda the other day and thought it looked like an improvement. I think it was $40.
AnswerID: 112796

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 14:09

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 14:09
Yes! It comes included in the Mark II package deal from Snowys Outdoors.

Good thick base. Even use it on the gas hotplate for quick eggs'n'bacon in morning without firing up the Cobb.
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 14:11

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 14:11
Here is the American Web Site, with a few recipes.

Cobbq.com

Bill


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AnswerID: 112802

Reply By: porl - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 14:15

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 14:15
I reckon wrap them in foil. Am not a chef but understand shanks need the muscle relaxed to make them so divine but you don't want to dry them out, not that a cobb would do that but just in case hey. Wenever i make shanks they are cooked with a tomato based sauce or at least the pan is covered when put in the oven. So the trick is to cook them long enough to relax the muscle but not expose them to a constant high heat so that they dry out before the muscle relaxes. Hope that makes sense, i even hope its right information.

AnswerID: 112806

Reply By: Member - Ross P (NSW) - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 14:18

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 14:18
Hi Try35,

Haven't tried lamb shanks but IMO time is the major factor. If you use the good quality heat beads 8 should be enough.

For my roasts I use a meat thermometer ( costs a few bucks from Barbeques Galore). I just stick it through one of the holes in the lid and keep an eye it. Means I minimise the number of times I need to take the lid off and lower the temperature and I can tell when its cooked.
Sit back with a glass of good red and "Bob's your uncle"........
AnswerID: 112808

Follow Up By: troy35 - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:17

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:17
Rosscoe,

What temperature should the meat thermometer be when they are cooked?
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FollowupID: 368990

Follow Up By: Member - Ross P (NSW) - Thursday, May 26, 2005 at 08:48

Thursday, May 26, 2005 at 08:48
The thermometer does have temperature readings but I just use the lamb; pork or whatever markings on the dial
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FollowupID: 369120

Reply By: Trev88 - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 16:23

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 16:23
Hi Troy

Lamb shanks are the same cut as gravy beef which is best cooked as a wet dish (Stew) The slow cook turns the conective tissue to soft flavorsum jelly.

If you notice the leg of lamb also has a shank and it cooks the same time as the leg and is the first peice i eat ( given I generaly carve the thing) so when roasting it treat it as a leg of lamb 180 deg 1 1/2 to 2 hours it is cooked. add 20min for every 20 deg cooler you cook it at remenber you wont cook anything at less than 60 deg

recipe

4 lamb shanks (thants enough for 1 if Im cooking) 3 - 4 tomatos depending on size or 1 can of peeled tomatos) Galic cloves to tast (I peel 6 to 8 cloves and leave them whole I then mash it into the sauce) herbs and spices to taste (Asian, english dont matter)

Get the cobb nice and hot throw in the shanks a light brase to seal them (stopps the drying out when roasted) cut the tops of the tommys and put a garlic clove on top place around the shank. Sprinkle only abot 25% of the herbs over and put lid on and cook (180 use a probe if not sure it takes some expeiemntation for 1 1/2 hours) i like my meat just cooked no need to offer it up to the gods by cremating it. remove the shanks and put 2 cup of water in to the cob bring to boil lid off and reduce while stiring. Pull out the garlic cloves and mash to taste and put back in to sauce. continue to reduce until thick enough for you and ad the remaining herbs and spices pour over shanks ad vegies and over lips past the gums.

If that dont warm the cockles of ya heart on a cold winters night camping nothing will

See ya in the bush

Trev88
AnswerID: 112816

Follow Up By: troy35 - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:21

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:21
Sounds like a great recipe Trev, I will give it a go.
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Reply By: mfewster - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 16:59

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 16:59
Now all these sound great, but why bother? We use a pressure cooker on out Coleman's and can turn out great stews, lamb shanks in a fraction of the time. Try a google for lamb shanks and pressure cooker and check the range of recipes and times that turn up.
AnswerID: 112824

Follow Up By: troy35 - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:31

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:31
Because first of all I dont care how long it takes to cook, Im camping, whats the rush, the beer is cold.
Secondly because the Cobb was given to me as a gift so Im not about to keep it in the cupboard at home and buy a pressure cooker. Other wise my thread would have been "How to cook shanks on a pressure cooker" and someone would have replied with "Why bother, I use a Cobb to cook mine and they turn out great.
Thirdly and correct me if I am wrong but if I didnt have the Cobb and had to decide between that and a pressure cooker I think I would have chosen the Cobb because a pressure cooker cannot roast or grill like a Cobb can.
But each to his own i guess and no doubt you enjoy your pressure cooked food.
The first time I used my Cobb was last October at a place called Myroodah crossing near Camballin in the Kimberley. (I live in Broome) It was bloody hot so the roast went in the Cobb and I went back down into the water for a few hours. When I came out the meat was cooked perfectly and we even did a bread and butter pudding for dessert.
After that moment I was hooked. I have only used it once since to do a xmas pork whilst the lamb cooked in the oven. It too turned out great.
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FollowupID: 368996

Follow Up By: mfewster - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:02

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:02
OK Troy, I think I owe you a recipe after that. This is our all time favourite Lamb Shanks recipe. It is for a pressure cooker, but you could adjust the times accordingly
Lamb Shanks with Garlicky Port Wine Sauce
Servings [Reset] Keys : Meats Alcoholic
Ingredients :

2 x Lamb shanks, about 1 pound each
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tbl Olive oil
10 x Cloves garlic, peeled and left whole
1/2 cup Chicken stock or broth
1/2 cup Port wine*
1 tbl Tomato paste
1/2 tsp Dried rosemary
1 tbl Unsalted butter
1 tsp Balsamic vinegar (up to 2)

Method :
Trim excess fat from the lamb shanks and season them with salt and pepper.
Heat the oil in the pressure cooker. Add the shanks and brown on all sides.
When they are almost completely browned, add the garlic cloves and cook until they are lightly browned but not burned. Add the stock or broth, port, tomato paste, and rosemary, stirring so the tomato paste dissolves.
Close the pressure cooker and bring up to full pressure (15 pounds). Reduce heat to stabilize pressure and cook for 30 minutes.
Release pressure and remove the lamb shanks. Return the pressure cooker to the stove. Boil, uncovered, for 5 minutes to reduce and thicken the sauce.
Whisk in the butter, then add the vinegar. Serve the sauce over the lamb shanks. Great with mashed potatoes.
*If you don't have port, you can use marsala or sweet sherry, or, what I often do, the cooking marsala that is sold in grocery stores. The only thing about the latter is that it is heavy with salt.
(Contemporary Books, 1990)-and there are many other good recipes here as well.


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FollowupID: 369001

Follow Up By: troy35 - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:30

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:30
Thanks Mfewster I will give that one a try too. One question though what sort of pan should I use to cook this in? I cant use the grilling tray that I would normally cook a roast on so I need some sort of pot to hold the liquid.
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FollowupID: 369010

Follow Up By: mfewster - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:59

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:59
Troy, I can't really help you with advice on pans for the Cobb as I don't own one. If I can't convice you to try a pressure cooker, try Trev88s recomendations for time etc with the recipe I gave. I think it would work pretty well. I also think this recipe would be good in a camp oven, but would recommend a trivet in the bottom of the pot to prevent sticking due to the long slow cooking time needed.

Now you have done it, I will have to get some shanks for my first go at this recipe for the winter.
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FollowupID: 369015

Reply By: KiwiAngler - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:44

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 17:44
Another treat that I cook on the Cobb usually before putting on a roast...just as an entre...:-)) are those new Coles pizza slices. I get the Cobb going and use the roasting ray...light spray of oil...put the four slices on...leave for about 8 minutes then take ut...put te roast in...eat the pizza as a snack....mmmmmm...pizza slices :-))
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AnswerID: 112833

Follow Up By: troy35 - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:14

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:14
Thats a great idea. I have the pizza tray thingy but have never bothered to use it.
When I go camping next weekend Im only going with three of my four kids and no wife. The kids are very light eaters and I found out the first few times if I cook too much they just dont eat it. Also the first days dinner I try to make as easy as possible because I have spent the day driving and then pitching the tent and getting the camp site ready.
I was going to do canned spaghetti but I might buy one of those Coles pizzas and cook that for dinner the first night. I can share any left over slices with the friends I am camping with.

If I were just to cook pizza how many heat beads do you think I should put in?
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Follow Up By: KiwiAngler - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:18

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 18:18
I would try 4 beads...I tried both the pizza tray and the roast tray (one with holes) and preferred the roast tray as it just browns the bottom and also allows the heat to come over the top and cook the topping...they go on frozen straight from freezer....mmmmmmm...pizza
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Reply By: Troopy Travellers (NSW) - Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 19:53

Wednesday, May 25, 2005 at 19:53
I like my Cobb but the MOTH is not happy with the space it takes up and says he can and does have roasts regularly at home and prefers a fire or the gas for camping, but each to their own.

I was very happy making homemade pizza in the Cobb on lebanese or flat bread on the tray with a trivet as well, I find most things need to be lifted up or they tend to catch on the bottom in the Cobb.

You might get great shanks from your butcher and if you do thats great, if you cook them in the oven at home and they are tender enough they will go fine in the Cobb. I get supermarket meat which is not always so good and I would not consider anything but the pressure cooker for shanks. I think they would need a lot longer in the cobb in liquid.

I brown the shanks in a pan, then brown chopped, onion, carrots, potatoes, swedes, turnips, throw them all together with a large can of diced tomatoes, italian herbs or spices to taste, a cup or so of red wine. After an hour and a quarter they drop of the bone and are delicious.

Carolyn
AnswerID: 112868

Reply By: Member - rengatt (VIC) - Thursday, May 26, 2005 at 09:02

Thursday, May 26, 2005 at 09:02
Hi Troy,

give this a try

Stewed LAMB SHANKS

the ingredients are for 2 SHANKS

LAMB SHANKS
place SHANKS in cold salted water and bring to boil, once at boil simmer for 60 minutes
remove from water and allow to drain
* in a preheated camp oven add about 3 tablespoons of oil,
once the oil is hot add the following
teaspoon oregano
teaspoon chopped parsley
1 diced onion
garlic paste to taste
chilli (optional)
1 coarsely grated carrot
2 coarsely grated potatoes

stir this until the onion is transparent

add 2 cans of peeled tomatoes (before adding remove liquid and squeeze the tomatoes to break them up

add a bay leaf
add salt
add 1-2 glasses of white wine
stir and then add the SHANKS

bring to boil and then allow to simmer for 45 to 60 minutes
(if your sauce looks watery after this take the SHANKS out and boil with out the lid for a further 10 - 15 minutes

Once done add the SHANKS to sauce mixture

Serve on a bed of mashed potatoes with vegies

(don't forget to pour sauce over the shank once you place it on the potato)

It sounds like a lot of work but most of the time is spent sitting around the fire with a beer in your hand waiting for it to it boil and simmer.

cheers Ren
AnswerID: 112954

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