Dual fuel vs Gas stove

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 17:46
ThreadID: 23587 Views:6539 Replies:16 FollowUps:18
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Quick vote and comments please. Dual Fuel or Gas? Don't ask what I want it for etc, I'm carrying gas anyway for the fridge. Buying a Coleman either way as jets don't get blocked in the gas one.

Cheers,

Smocky.
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Reply By: Redback - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 18:09

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 18:09
Mate for convienence only and no fuel smell i'd go gas but we don't camp from the car or have a tent we have a camper, so lumping a gas cylinder around could be awkward so a duelfuel burner might be easier as the fuel container is in the burner.

Baz.
AnswerID: 114368

Follow Up By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 19:14

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 19:14
Hi Baz, you hit my dillema in one. Carrying the gas bottles. At the moment we have an old gas cooker, gas light and gas powered fridge. That's a lot of room taken up in gas bottles. Not to mention the problem if they run out and it's not convenient to nick into town for a refill!!

Looking at getting a dual fuel stove and light (as both need replacing), but wondered if anyone had experience with the dual fuel and thought they were a pain in the neck to use. If people are happy to use them, I'll buy them.

Cheers,

Jason.
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Reply By: Phil P - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 18:18

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 18:18
If you already carry gas, then go for a gas cooker. I think Coleman may have changed the burners on their gas cookers. The original Coleman style had a screw on top of each burner that enabled you to take apart the burner.
AnswerID: 114370

Follow Up By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 19:15

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 19:15
Hi Phil, I currently carry STACKS of gas and that's kinda my concern. I don't like carrying bottles in the car and I need at least 2 bottles at the moment and large ones at that. Looking for feedback as to whether to move to liquid fuel instead.

Cheers,

Smocky.
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Reply By: kim (mr) - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 19:37

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 19:37
I have both the colman dual fuel stove and light, as I wanted to avoid carring gas.
And even thogh they were not the cheepest of things I have never looked back, they use bugger all fuel. In regards to the smell of carring fuel I made the mistake of using ulp once never againe. If you use the colman fuel or shellite (much cheaper and just as good) you will find it has next to no smell at all.
For the first couple of times I used them I had flames out the top of the light and thought the stove was going to blow up but as long as you remember to relese the presure once you have finnised with them you'll be fine.
AnswerID: 114376

Reply By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 19:55

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 19:55
I was in a dilemma over this one, a couple of years ago, too. I went for gas; mainly because I was very doubtful that I would be able to persuade the dual fuel stove to go to a _really_ low heat for simmering. I bought the Coleman two burner low pressure stove with electronic ignition (for an extra $20 it's worth every penny errr... cent :) and have been very pleased with it. My only criticism is that because of the cover plate it's hard to clean if something boils over. The gas stove is physically smaller than the DF stove too.

Mike Harding
AnswerID: 114378

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 20:16

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 20:16
Just re-read the thread.

I don't use (any more) a gas light (they're noisy, a fire hazard and hard to transport without breaking mantles) but with a Coleman gas stove and a gas fridge (mine is a Finch) I get about 10 days use from one 4 kg gas bottle running both those items. Gas lights just _eat_ gas.

Mike Harding
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Reply By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 21:58

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 21:58
Have used both and find the coleman dual fuel the way to go - get fuel any where - pay for only what you use. I hated that feeling of having to get the gas bottles topped up just in case they might be low and then being charged for a full refill every time, not to mention the exhorbitant charges for gas refills once your out of the major cities.
AnswerID: 114386

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 20:49

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 20:49
Ian,

You should have changed your gas retailer.
An honest retailer will weigh the bottle both before and after re-filling and only charge you the difference in weight of the gas put in.

Pretty simple really.

I checked the dual fuel unit out and decided it was just too big.
The Coleman 2 burner with electronic ignition is slim, light and does not block as there is no jets. There is also infinite control over the burner output from gentle simmer, to full flame.

The decision was a no brainer to me, but then I don't mind toting the bottles (2) around.
Bill


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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 23:13

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 23:13
I changed from gas to a Coleman dual fuel stove a few years ago.

Good points with the dual fuel stove is the hotter flame, the easier refills, and its all so compact. And when I get home, just top up the fuel tank. You can do a lot of cooking on one litre of fuel. And it works in freezing cold weather.

Downside is the pumping procedure (35 pumps before you can light it).

But we cook and boil water on the fire 95% of the time, so it gets a lot less use these days, and we'd probably get by with a $25 butane burner.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 114393

Reply By: Footloose - Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 23:21

Saturday, Jun 04, 2005 at 23:21
I started with gas and still use it. I only carry the 4.5kg bottle, and find if used carefully it lasts a long time. Yes I hate not knowing how much is in it but you can approximate by running warm water over the side and feeling where the cooler parts are. I used to break the light glass several times a trip until I found out how to pack them...in their original container and carry very carefully.
Got a heck of a shock on the corros on CY one time. I could hear this hissing sound. Stopped and found a cigarette lighter had decided to call it a day. Never had any probs with the gas bottles thank goodness.
Basically its a 2 burn stove and a light for a while at night. Works for me.
AnswerID: 114394

Reply By: ev700 - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 02:27

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 02:27
Wouldn't a dual fuel stove be no less risky than gas if carried in a car boot or cabin? Shellite has a flash point of -32C (!) and it is easily set alight by a stray spark. Petrol is no slouch either.

I have always used gas for campingr and swap the 4.5 kg bottles with the home bbq - so the 'new' bottle goes camping. That way I only likely to run out of gas at home where the bottle is easily swapped with the spare.

I dislike carrying fuels incl gas in the cabin (when I do not have a trailer) but what is the solution? Suppose it could go into a plastic crate on the roof rack.

AnswerID: 114400

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 09:10

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 09:10
Yep you're right. I had my Coleman shellite stove accidentally turn itself on a badly corrugated road, so I made a little device to stop this from happening.

Shellite and unleaded (like LPG) should be stored outside the vehicle. Most of us turn a blind eye, I prefer to use the 4 litre Coleman container and will be storing it under my tray when I get around to building a hatch.

Cheers
Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 10:18

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 10:18
I suppose anything is POTENTIALLY dangerous, The Coleman fuel though is better than petrol in that I believe it doesn't produce the dangerous fume cloud that petrol does. Petrol itself doesn't blow up, it only burns, it's the fumes that burn so quickly that cause explosions. White fuel doesn't do that, it just burns. Also, any fuel should be carried properly, and I don't think I'd be carrying the fuel inside the stove canister.

I re-read the archives on this topic and there is pretty much a split down the middle for support for dual fuel and LPG.

The other thing about LPG is that a 4KG gas bottle takes up a fair bit of room and is quite heavy. It will run the devices about as long as 1 litre of white fuel, so I was thinking that I'm saving a fair bit of space too.

Anyway, more thought needed by me I guess.

Cheers,

Smocky.
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FollowupID: 370335

Follow Up By: ev700 - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 21:47

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 21:47
Smocky
Good points, especially the comparison of 1L to 4Kg gas. As usual I think I'll probably wait until the gas cylinders need re-testing and
re-consider.
Maybe Coleman stoves have come a long way over the years and I am still influenced by stories of 'Coleman Moments' [fire balls].
EV700
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Reply By: ev700 - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 09:23

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 09:23
This has been a bit of a heads up for me to fit a small crate on the roof rack.

I did consider dual fuel recently - testing cylinders was close to the new replacement cost for the cylinders (they routinely replace the tap).
AnswerID: 114412

Reply By: stephenl - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 14:25

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 14:25
I love travelling the outback. I have used both and no longer use gas, as when it is very cold in the morning, it takes for ever to boil the billy. ,I did a comparison on a very cold morning. Four minutes with the Coleman due fuel stove and 20 minutes and still waiting with gas. You can get some very good little single Coleman cookers that take up little room, as as mentioned by other people, are very cheap to run. For me, gas is a thing of the past.
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AnswerID: 114433

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 14:50

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 14:50
That's because you're using a high pressure gas cooker. I don't understand the physics of it (probably, they simply don't need high pressure gas!?) but the low pressure (more expensive) cookers are nowhere near as badly affected by low temperatures.

I remember late one night in the desert in south west Qld I could barely get enough heat to warm up a can of stew from my high pressure gas ring however my Coleman low pressure stove happily boils a kettle of water in a normal timeframe in -2 deg. C mornings in the High Country.

Mike Harding
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FollowupID: 370345

Reply By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 16:27

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 16:27
Have to agree with most of above , changed to petrol light many years ago and its great, then changed to petrol stove and just as happy, no need for any gas, just a 10 litre of ULP and all is sweet.
I have carried a spare plunger for years and and have never had to use it.
Never used the coleman fuel just ULP and works fine in light and a little fumy if in tent or confimed area with stove, but great outside even in wind.
We have gone the extra step now and leave the light home and use 3, 12v 11w double flouro lights, instant light and no mantles, great. 1 inside camper 1 outside and 1 on back of vehicle , with extra length leads, are good for all outside activities.
AnswerID: 114444

Follow Up By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 21:02

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 21:02
G'day Pesty,

how do you run all them lights? I've got a 12v flouro that I do like, but you have to be near the car to use it. I've got a jump pack that I sometimes run it from, but not sure how long it will ast and kind of wanted to keep the jump pack for exactly that. About half the time we camp, the tent isn't right next to the car.

Cheers,

Jason.

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FollowupID: 370365

Follow Up By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 10:23

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 10:23
Hi Jason
I have dual batteries in car and another in camper and the lights only draw 0.9 of an amp so will run for a long time.
So at 0.9 and 180 amps of batteries 1 light should run for about 150 hrs!
They also have switches on them so they get turned on and off as required.
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FollowupID: 370414

Follow Up By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 10:58

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 10:58
Ah, dual batteries. Another item in the long list of wants I have.

To be quite honest, I find having leads running everywhere a bit of an annoyance. I still use one mind you for inside the tent, but use it sparingly and running from the jump pack.

I think when we camp by the car, to have a couple handing off a pole on the roofracks or something like that would be OK.

Cheers.
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FollowupID: 370418

Reply By: Member - Russell B (SA) - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 17:05

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 17:05
I use Coleman DF stove and Lamp, convenient and effective. Have used gas but tired of the extra gas bottles etc.

Regards
Russell
AnswerID: 114446

Reply By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 21:09

Sunday, Jun 05, 2005 at 21:09
Thanks everyone for your excellent replies as usual.

The motive behind the question was that Kangaroo Tent City had a 20% off sale this weekend. I have already got a 2 burner Coleman stove I bought from them that they were willing to trade up as I hadn't opened it, but I've decided to keep that as it's only worth $99 at it's current price to them.

Also, I checked out there "Discount" price on the DF lamps and it was around the same price you could get it from discount camping or others, so urgency is gone. Will wait for Ray's next sale I think.

I'm still going to go out and get a DF lamp and probably the stove as well. To be honest, the couple hundred it's going to cost to give me options is probably worth while. The issue I didn't really think about was the cold. Trying to get away with some of the guys at the moment, but many it's pretty cold out and we were going to rely on the little butane canister cooker ($25 job that probably everyone has got one or 2 of) Probably will look now to get a small single burner Coleman DF stove to start with and go from there.

Cheers all and stay safe,

Smocky.
AnswerID: 114473

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 07:09

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 07:09
As I mentioned, above, the cold doesn't affect low pressure gas units but it will kill your $25 ring.

Let us know how you go with the dual fuel stove, I'm especially interested in knowing if you can get a _really_ low simmer from it for cooking rice using the absorption method for example.

Mike Harding
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FollowupID: 370388

Follow Up By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:35

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:35
G'day Mike,

Didn't realise the Coleman LPG stove would be OK in really cold weather, but I'm glad I didn't trade it in yesterday.

I think Ray's is having a sale this week, so will be getting it and trying at home to learn. Will report back.

Cheers,

Jason.
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FollowupID: 370398

Follow Up By: porl - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 11:17

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 11:17
If you're going the way of the DF lamp spending a bit (okay well a lot) extra on the Coleman Northstar model is way worth it. I had the double mantel DF lamp and it was great but the mantels broke often. When it died (salt corrosion made me toss it rather than rebuild - it got drowned by waves many times - always worked though) i looked in the model up - the Northstar, and it is amazing - soooo much brighter - completely different mantel that hasn't broken yet, and just an incredible light.
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FollowupID: 370423

Follow Up By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 11:29

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 11:29
G'day porl,

I had a look at the NS and it was BIG as well as the price tag. Around $200 I think. The single mantle is around $100 so it's a fair price difference. I think the NS has electronic ignition though which would be well worth it.

Cheers.
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FollowupID: 370426

Follow Up By: porl - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 11:39

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 11:39
hey smocky

the electronc ignition is the only ordinary part (which is why i didn't mention it) - have never had much success and just use a match now. I think you can get them for around $180 if you shop around.

If you go the lower spec coleman consider this mantel - i cut and pasted the info from a 2002 posting from this site:

"G'day Steve, we have a Gasmate lantern (model 2012) and the factory supplied mantles were absolutely useless. They would get a hole between lightings even when there was no movement of the lantern. Consequently the glass cracked on the 2nd lighting. Rang Ranger back and said the supplied mantles weren't strong enough, we would like a new glass. No go, they said you should check the mantle every time you light it. Your fault. We were going thru mantles and a second new glass, very p###ed off. Went into Camping Australia in Fremantle and mentioned the prob, no worries, try these,it's all I (the owner) use. Bought 2x packs of 3, thinking we would need them all out in the sticks. Put the 1st one in and it's still there having travelled over 1000's of Km's of rough roads and tracks, not packed carefully. Don't know if this type will fit your Coleman but it is a "Companion LM 176 medium single tie". Tough as. Hope you find one to fit. Grant"
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FollowupID: 370429

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 21:05

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 21:05
Guys,

Coleman also do a Northstar lantern as an electric unit. Uses fluroescent tube and 8 x "D" size batteries. I only use mine for the camper trailer and get about 3 years out of a set of batteries. Also, the light just gets a little dimmer as the batteries run down, so you get plenty of warning of their imminent demise.

I only use this lantern inside the camper and a versalite outside.
Now leave the gas lantern in the shed.
Bill


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FollowupID: 370508

Reply By: fozzy - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 07:36

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 07:36
smocky
will be changing from gas to df coleman either 3 burner or 2 singles when i get around to it and when someone has a good sale on
cheers
fozzy
AnswerID: 114502

Reply By: Robert - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:14

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:14
In regard to using ulp aren't people concerned about health issues from burning petrol, especially in the confined area of a tent. When you consider what chemicals are used in petrol I wouldn't like to cook with it.
AnswerID: 114506

Follow Up By: Member - Smocky (NSW) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:32

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 08:32
I agree Robert, I won't be using ULP in mine, but realise that it is possible in an emergency.

Also, I won't be using mine inside a tent EVER anyway. I doubt many people would use any kind of flame based light inside a tent. Far too risky.

Cheers,

Smocky.
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FollowupID: 370397

Reply By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 19:51

Monday, Jun 06, 2005 at 19:51
Smocky,
Are you by any chance the Smock who used to knock around 7 Hills?

Ian
AnswerID: 114652

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