Rear wheel alignment

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 20:40
ThreadID: 23670 Views:1829 Replies:5 FollowUps:5
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I have had BFG ATs on the truck for over two years (80,000 kms) and they are starting to look like they need replacing. They would have lasted another 10,000 kms if they had worn evenly. The rear left tyre is excessively worn on the outside of the tread. I am at a loss to understand how a rear wheel can be out of alignment? It is on an LX470 which I presume is the same rear end as the 100 series. Does anyone know a good 4WD wheel aligner in the ACT region?
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 20:54

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 20:54
Bob,

Are you sure the tyre(s) haven't been rotated? (swapped front to back)

Noticed mine had at the last service, even though I had instructed the Service Company not to.
I think it is just an automatic task that they get into the habit of doing by following a check list.
Bill


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AnswerID: 114817

Follow Up By: Bob of KAOS - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:06

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:06
Good point Sand Man. I assumed I was the only person who would muck around with the wheels (and I hadn't). The front left is worn on the outside (as you'd expect). The front right is worn evenly, and the rear right is worn evenly. Swapping front right with rear left would account for the apparent wear, but why would they do that?
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FollowupID: 370631

Follow Up By: Nudenut - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:24

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:24
most of our tyres are not directional so they usually swap diagonally? i think that how it was done yrs ago before directionals came into play
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FollowupID: 370633

Follow Up By: Exploder - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:27

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:27
They would of put the 2 best tyres on the front for steering/ control reasons when it was serviced I assume.

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FollowupID: 370635

Follow Up By: Nudenut - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 07:38

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 07:38
recommended tyre rotation here
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FollowupID: 370658

Reply By: brett - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:05

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:05
It does sound like the rear tyre was on the front left for most of it's life. I don't think you have any camber or toe adjustment on a rear rigid axle
AnswerID: 114819

Reply By: Member - Banjo (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:11

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:11
Its a bugger - I got 80k from my first set on the Jack - all shoulders were thin while there was some meat left in the middle. With even wear I may have got to 85-90k tops. The stony outback trips take a big toll on the rubber. I'm running my new set up in pressure to try and get more even wear across the face. The inside shoulders of this new set are wearing a bit quicker on the front than the others so it goes in for a check next week. Gotta stretch that lifespan - they cost so much !
AnswerID: 114820

Follow Up By: Footloose - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:19

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:19
Yep...and one sharp rock or branch and they're toast ! :(
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FollowupID: 370632

Reply By: Footloose - Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:13

Tuesday, Jun 07, 2005 at 21:13
Bob, could it be a rear wheel bearing that needs adjustment ?
AnswerID: 114822

Reply By: floyd - Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 15:17

Wednesday, Jun 08, 2005 at 15:17
80,000 is pretty good milage from a 4WD tyre. I have only beaten that once. I got 90k out of BFG AT 33 inchers and they still had a bit left.

If your rear end is out it could be the diff alignment. Most rear ends (all Toyota solid axels) have a "centre bolt" that comes down from the axel and goes through all of the rear leaf springs to locate them centrally. It is kind of like a stud that is a few inches long. They can break off or rust off if they have been dipped in salt water as they are not very thick. They can also be broken after serios off road travel on really rough terrain. When driving with a broken centre bolt it feels like your alignment is out and you have to correct by turning the steering wheel off centre in order to maintain a straight line.

When travelling behind a vehicle with a broken centre bolt it appears that the rear wheels are not following the line of the front tyres. It also looks like the vehicle is driving a little "sideways" down the road.

To see if this is the case hose down your driveway and drive through the puddle. If there are 4 tyre marks exiting the puddle onto the dry surface then this would indicate a mis aligned rear end. If there are only 2 tracks then the alignment is OK. Another way to sus it out is to get someone to drive the vehicle in a dead straight line and follow behind to see if the vehicle is out of alignment.
AnswerID: 114904

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