ARB Bullbar - Recovery Points

Submitted: Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
ThreadID: 2412 Views:8662 Replies:9 FollowUps:8
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G'day All,

I have an ARB steel bullbar fitted to my turbo diesel Prado.

What is your opinion on using the reinforced holes at the bottom of the bullbar as recovery points (ie attaching a bridle to these via shackles).

The prado has an existing recovery hook on the RHS chassis rail, but it appears that the thin steel plate (deflector ?) at the bottom of the radiator will foul a snatch strap or winch cable when attached at this point.

Any thoughts ???
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Reply By: mud's ok - Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
Hi,

Not sure about ARB Bullbars (no experience I'm afraid). I have a Jackaroo and the nudge bar required me to refit the recovery hook on the opposite side from standard. In the new position the recovery hook fouls the bash plate under the front of the engine to the point where you cant slip a stap over it. To overcome the problem I use a rated shackle to to attach the strap. I know this doesn't answer your question, but I hope it helps.
AnswerID: 8716

Reply By: Slunnie - Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
They should be ok. They are rated to be strong enough to use with a winch and snatch block. ARB are basically saying it is good for light recoverywork only, but I think they have dropped enough hints to the public to say that the bar is strong enough to snatch recover from, but being silly about it will do damage.

I have been warned about snatching from one chassis rail as it may bend the chassis. The trick is to keep the loads even, which the bar will do if both recovery eyes are used

Regards
Slunnie
AnswerID: 8720

Reply By: Truckster - Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 19, 2002 at 01:00
Thats what I use on the front of the Truckster ... few mates are using an A frame chain to center the pull... Good idea too.

Another one is there are 2 sections on the upright where you can bolt "hooks" to.. using high Tensile bolts, you can use these points too.
AnswerID: 8727

Follow Up By: Duffa - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Thanks Truckster...I ahd considered bolting the hooks to the uprights but there is linited room at the base of the upright (ie. not enough depth of plate at this location).
Cheers.
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FollowupID: 4277

Follow Up By: Janset - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Hi guys.
As a matter of info. I have seen those points used by members in my 4WD club, and every one who has used it find that the upright buckles out and disfigures eventually to some degree and therefore it is no longer a recommended location.

The snatch at times can be a very hard one.

Ideally, the chassis is the way to go, even if you have to fabricate an extension off the chassis. But remember if you decide to go down that path, that same extension on the chassis is subject to acting as a lever so you would have to fabricate so as to negate the lever action. Sounds goobly gook, but I understand it :)

Regards
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FollowupID: 4285

Reply By: Tony - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
G'day Duffa, the double plated holes on an ARB Bar are best used only for winching and used in conjunction with a bridle shackled to each hole.

Fitting of two rated tow hooks in the holes provided are best used with a snatch strap, as the bar is bolted to both rails this lessens the chance of bending one of them.

As in all recovery opperations use the correct gear for the vehicle ie. ratted shackles etc. Sefety is parramount.
AnswerID: 8740

Follow Up By: Duffa - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Tony, Are you suggesting bolting the tow hooks with a single bolt to the reinforced holes on the bull bar?

Cheers.
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FollowupID: 4278

Reply By: damien - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
I always thought (& have been taught) that using shackles with a snatch strap is a big no-no.

AnswerID: 8748

Follow Up By: Flappan - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
My belief as well.

I think the "rule" goes, never have a snatch strap and shackles in your hands at the same time.

IMO if you have to use a shackle to attach it, you need hooks.

Probably the only change to that would be attaching a rated chain with shackles and snatching off that. The chain spreading the loads between the two shackles and therefore effectively reducing the strain in half.
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FollowupID: 4279

Follow Up By: Tony - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Only if you use a shackle to join two straps.
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FollowupID: 4307

Follow Up By: Janset - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Tony...NO..NO..NO!

NEVER EVER use a shackle to join 2 snatch straps.

If one end or other becomes detached the shackle in the middle becomes a lethal missile.

To join 2 straps together you inter-loop them through the eye and insert a rolled up newspaper or even a light weight piece of dowel about 6 inches long and the thickness slightly more than a broom handle to avoid the straps from locking together.

The short bit of dowel or a rolled up newspaper is strong enough to withstand the forces produced by a snatch (as they are not subject to a load), but not heavy enough to become a lethal missile unless you are stupid enough to be standing right next to as strap during the snatch.

Again don't forget the bag or sack thrown over the snatch strap to absorb the energy in the event of a disconnected or broken strap.

If you do not know how to link the 2 straps together, ask any 4WD Accessory outlet and they will be glad to show you how.

I can not over emphasize. The use of a snatch strap would have to be one of the most dangerous piece of equipment that you are likely to use for a potential of causing serious or fatal injury. The other being a broken winch cable.

Regards
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FollowupID: 4353

Follow Up By: Tony - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2002 at 01:00
I think Janset is missing the point here I said :"only if you use a shackle to join two straps) meaning thats when shackles are dangerous.

As for newspapers? I'll stick to my piece of thick shovel handle.
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FollowupID: 4457

Reply By: Member - Kevin - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
I had an ARB steel bullbar on my '95 Discovery, installed by ARB. First recovery was on a mountain track, using a bridle through the reinforced rings and Tirfor hand winch - result was that the rings got bent horribly. ARB withdrew their advice that they were recovery points, suggesting instead they were only for 'light' towing, straightened the rings out and sold me two hooks to bolt onto the upright section of the bar - the 'real' recovery point.

First recovery with this arrangement was a snatch off a dune in the Simpson Desert - the bar rotated on its chassis mountings, the wings on the bar put two nice holes in my guards. My local ARB then checked with head office and advised that the bull bar was not designed for recovery at all (nor any form of towing) - recovery hooks mounted directly on the chassis rail were their next recommendation. They did however pay for the panelbeating and paint work on the guards.

Since then I have had several recoveries using properly rated recovery hooks bolted onto the chassis rails with no problems whatsoever.

I now have a Nissan Patrol with a Nissan steel bullbar and chassis mounted recovery hooks - and I will only use the chassis hooks for recoveries or towing.

Cheers

Kevin
AnswerID: 8754

Reply By: bruce.h - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Gday Duffa
hooks on the chassis is the only way to go safety first second & last , also be aware that if your vehicle is fitted with air bags recovering from the roo bar increases the risk of air bag inflation as some bars now come with sencers fitted so that the air bags still work.
Regards Bruce
AnswerID: 8755

Reply By: Duffa - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Thanks for the replies everyone....Iwould like to fit hooks to the chasis, but as I mentiopned the deflector in front of the radiator will be fouled by the strap or cable. I can put a packer between the hook and the chassis but this doesn't give that much more advantage.

Cheers.
AnswerID: 8757

Follow Up By: Tony - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
If its all to difficult, fit a winch and do your own recovery.
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FollowupID: 4308

Reply By: Phil G - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Duffa,

Like others have said, a rated recovery hook bolted directly to the chassis with high tensile bolts is the way to go and avoid shackles as they are potentially lethal missiles on the end of a strap.

I also own a Prado TD and you can fit the aftermarket recovery hooks on BOTH sides at the front. The hole spacings are perfect. So buy another rated hook. You'll also need to buy some high tensile bolts as the threads are different to those that come with the hooks. You can then hook your strap to either side.

Phil G
Prado GXL TD
AnswerID: 8770

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