LIEMACK Fridge users

Submitted: Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
ThreadID: 2417 Views:11232 Replies:13 FollowUps:23
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I have read with interest all the discussion on fridges. The fact is I own a Liemack(now Reefer) 50L dual temp fridge/freezer. I am interested to hear from other users of Liemack what battery configurations they have, deep cycle or ordinary batteries and a no bull response on average hours you get out of your batteries.
I seem to be having problems but everyone is pointing the finger at everyone. I have had the fridge checked out and they say it is fine, changed the batteries to paralell wiring with no isolator, auto electrician says there is nothing wrong with the car electrics so I have shelved out about $300 to be told everything is fine but a single battery is lasting less than 12 hours with an average food load. The fact is it was a fantastic fridge when everything is working and in tip top condition the problem is no one can tell me what is wrong. I would be interested to here from anyone who has had problems and can offer any suggestions.
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Reply By: OziExplorer - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
David the fact is Liemack fridges draw 3 times the power of other fridges, and 12 hours for a battery is not bad.

Sure the Liemack is a good fridge, only problem it sucks power, and at the end of the day, does the same job as a fridge that consumes a 1/3 of the power. The Liemack uses a Mitsubishi 240vAC compressor, and the 12vDC power is converted into 240vAC to run the compressor. This alone is a very wasteful exercise, before you get to the efficiency of the compressor.

Take for example a Chescold 3 way fridge/freezer. Until recently I owned one of these, and even in mid-summer heat never had an issue with it, as it was installed exactly as it should be, and was a great fridge. However, you would never even consider running it from 12vDC on battery, as the current consumption is 10 amps. Your Liemack is about 6 amps. I had a rely on my vehicle, so when I turned my engine off, my fridge 12vDC got disconnected. If I was stopping for any time, I would put it on gas. Unfortunatly you do not have this option with your Liemack.

Your options:
2 x 75w solar panels - minimum
Honda EU1000 generator
Sell the Liemack and buy one of the better quality well insulated Danfoss powered units.
AnswerID: 8769

Reply By: Michael - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Hi David,
I also have a Leimack fridge, a 90 litre front opener. We did 6 week trip up through the centre in September !999. We only had our original battery in our new Patrol and it performed resonably well considering the extreme temps that we encountered. We found that if we set camp before about 4pm, the fridge would be showing low by about 9pm, then out for a 30minute drive, not the ideal situation when camped next to other campers. Then it would run overnite till about !0am. When i put a second battery (no isolator), it really made the fridge workable it would run about 24 hours. Typical would be an early afternoon camp say, 2pm till 2pm next day, keeping the sun off the fridge is also necessary for the 24 hour run time. Battery set was 11.3 volts with one battery and and 11 volts for two batteries. If you set your temp too low , this can have a huge affect on the run time. I always set mine to 1 deg, that gives about -5 deg in the freezer. My batteries are standard N70ZZ, 15 plate, but find now my batteries are struggling after12 months of running the fridge full time, the constant charge , discharge must take its toll on the batteries. I still believe it is the best fridge on the market, but the battery situation seems to be a problem to most owners. I would be interested to hear what settings you set and the run times in hot conditions. Best regards, Michael
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Michael, looking at the graph of the Liemack fridge from the controlled tempreture chamber tests, the LIemack constantly cycled - high current consumption!
By the looks of things in the graph, I would say that it is caused by poor insulation. I see the insulation is poured urethane foam, not pressure injected polyurethane foam.
Liemack in the their instructions recommend their fridge is wired up with 10mm wire!
Yes, the Liemack was a good fridge, but the problem is it _Affordable_Storage_Drawers.aspx excessive power due to the compressor they use, and what appears to be poor insulation. Poor insulation is an issue with many other 12vDC fridges as well. At the end of the day, the Liemack using at least 3 times more power than a well insulated Danfoss compressor powered fridge, still keeps the food and drinks cold, but by drawing three times more power does not do a better job than a well insulated Danfoss powered fridge.
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Follow Up By: David - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Thanks for that. I set mine at about 0 degrees and find that the compressor kicks in about every 20 mins for about 5mins. I get so confused. Everybody tells me that they draw the most power but then the manufacturers say that over the course of a few hours they use less amps because they cool down quickerand colder in the hot weather than anything else. I think it is a great fridge. I don't want to buy something else if what I have is the best. It is just too costly to be swapping to another brand on the chance that it is better. Thats why I wanted to hear from other Liemack users. I live only 10 minutes from the factory and they have been very helpfull but I am starting to get a bit embarrassed ringing them all the time.
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Follow Up By: David - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
Thanks for that. I set mine at about 0 degrees and find that the compressor kicks in about every 20 mins for about 5mins. I get so confused. Everybody tells me that they draw the most power but then the manufacturers say that over the course of a few hours they use less amps because they cool down quickerand colder in the hot weather than anything else. I think it is a great fridge. I don't want to buy something else if what I have is the best. It is just too costly to be swapping to another brand on the chance that it is better. Thats why I wanted to hear from other Liemack users. I live only 10 minutes from the factory and they have been very helpfull but I am starting to get a bit embarrassed ringing them all the time.
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Follow Up By: Michael - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
To Oziexplorer, the Leimack has a heap of features that most other fridges dont, voltage cutout freezer and fridge at the same time.Front opening door if you like or a top opener, front open is great for station wagons. Can charge video batts and the like (240v) or 300watts @ 240v on its own. Great for a huge soldering iron and other uses.
David, if you go up one degree,, you may gain an hour or two, it makes a huge difference, just one degree. If you used an original wiring loom check the two pin socket for tight wire connection and good conection to the body(earth). One more thing which can be a problem, if you have a vehicle with a full chassis, sometimes there is not a proper earth between the body and the chassis, i found this out with my driving lights. This may or may not be a problem in your case. Michael
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Michael, I realise all the 'features' of the Limack, however, for that type of current consumption and price, you would really want something out of the box. Yes, I know they have a 300w 240vAC invertor, know they have a voltage cut-out, but those items can be purchased seperatly if needed. As for charging video and NiMH batteries, I just use a 12vDC charger, which is far more efficient and _Affordable_Storage_Drawers.aspx less power than running a 240vAC invertor to charge the batteries through a 240vAC charger. The inefficiences are greater and more current consumption all the time.

It is highly inefficient to charge a battery, then use an invertor to convert the 12vDC to 240vAC to run an already inefficient electric motor.

With the Liemack installation saying you need to use 10mm cable, I think speaks volumes for itself.
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Michael, regardless of what the manufacturers say, the independent tests prove that the Liemack uses nearly three times as much power as other brands of fridge.
I don't doubt their claims the actual Mitsubishi rotary compressor is more efficient than others - HOWEVER, you need to look at how the application is of this compressor to achieve their claims. It is most certainly not using an invertor to make 240vAC and what appears to be wanting, their insulation quality, this causes the Limack/Reefer to end up such a power hungry fridge.
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Reply By: Member - Nigel - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
i've got a mate with a liemack who loves it, but I think I get more run time that he does.

Some things to check:

Do you have 10mm2 (starter size cable) from both the positive AND negative battery terminals to your fridge?

If you have a multimeter put the positive probe on the positive battery terminal and the negative probe on the positive cable as close to the inverter as possible (or better still at the inverter) then take a reading when the compressor is running.. That reading is the voltage drop in the cable. The higher the reading the more battery power that is being wasted as heat in the cable and decreasing your run time.
AnswerID: 8779

Reply By: Michael - Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2002 at 01:00
By the way David, Is Liemack still manufacturing Fridges? I read that they had gone out of business. You mentioned Reefer, is it new owners? Its probably the most expensive bit of camp gear I own and I was worried about service and backup long term if my 90 DTV has problems. I've had it for 3 years now and it hasn't let me down. Michael
AnswerID: 8782

Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
This mob have taken them over:
http://www.refrigerationresearch.com.au/
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Follow Up By: David - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Liemack went in to liquidation but was then taken over by a company called Refrigeration Research phone 08 83983224 based in Mt Barker in the Adelaide Hills. I live only a stone's throw from them(part of the reason I originally purchased the Liemeck). They build the "Reefer" fridge the same as the Leimack and can look after any queies you might have re your fridge and are more than willing to help.
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Reply By: pete - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
David ,
I went through exactly the same as you earlier this year-the fridge would run for 20-30 hours using BOTH batteries and then would not shut off at the designated voltage, no matter what it was set at.
I spent fuitless hours & dollars having it checked out by different auto electricians and Liemack checked it twice , but to no avail.
In the end I put in a box & sent it back to Liemack telling them I wanted my money back ( which thankfully they did 6 weeks before they shut down) and bought a Trailblaza.
A very disapointing exercise as I believe the Liemack had all the features design and construction that I was after,but in the end i'm wrapped with the Trailblaza.
Regards Pete

AnswerID: 8812

Reply By: Terry - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
David I wouldn't take to much notice of the start up power consumption, I own a 90 lt DT Liemack, and have never had a problem with it, I've also owned an Engel and now don't. I live in the North of SA and it get pretty warm here, my Leimak works well in this heat, keeps food frozen and chilled although 48C tests its run time. Mine has been through a few musters now on the back of one of our ute's, provided it gets a good clean out with the air gun when we finish it holds up very well, 3 years now. The Liemack, although they're now called Reefers, kicks in at higher power levels than other fridges, but mine probably runs around 3amp/hrs on average. The insulation is far better than the competion and if I'm right is actually thermal rated, although someone may need to confirm this with the new company. My unit dosen't draw masses amounts of power, if a unit _Affordable_Storage_Drawers.aspx a third the power chances are it refigerates a third of what a Liemack does. Its similar to owing a Subaru and wanting it to do the same thing a Land Cruiser can do. Your batteries in parallel are the way I have mine set up, I use 2 Optima batteries, they're expensive but in this country you need something that will do the job. I'd check all connections make sure they're clean and there's no breaks especially in soldered areas. I'd also check the alternator to make sure its charging the batteries properly and lastly are you using the wiring kit Liemack supply with their fridges, that makes a big difference. I'd stick with your fridge regardless of the comments here, and I'd call the company to see what they have to say, the contact details are here on this site.
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Terry, unfortunatly, the independent NATA Certified tests do not hold up your claims. The start up current consumption is not the issue, the issue is the total power draw over a 24 hour period.

Firstly, the insulation on the Liemack/Reefer, is *most* definitely wanting looking at the graphs. It is poured polyurethane foam, which can no way compete with pressure injected urethane foam. The conversion from 12vDC to 240vAC to run the compressor, is wasteful and inefficient.
The NATA Certified tests prove that the Liemack/Reefer is a fridge that _Affordable_Storage_Drawers.aspx approximately 3 (THREE) times more power than the majority of other fridges. This is not three times more at start-up, this is three times more over a 24 hour period.

As for your statement "if a unit _Affordable_Storage_Drawers.aspx a third the power chances are it refigerates a third of what a Liemack does" is absolute garbage. The Liemack/Reefer is an inefficient, poorly designed, poorly manufactured unit with poured in foam. Suggest you go to the libarary and get the independent NATA certified tests to see how the Liemack/Reefer cycled excessively during the tests. If Liemack/Reefer was such a well designed fridge, why is no other manufacaturer using that compressor.
There has to be a damn good reason. Why is just over 70% of the Australian market is held by Danfoss.
Liemack/Reefer went out of business - WHY?
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Follow Up By: Terry - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Oziexplorer

I'm not sure what test or graphs your talking about but I'm sure they are similar to statistics, you can make them say whatever you want. My unit works well under extreme conditions and thats all that really matters. From the tone of your reply I wouldn't be surprised if your a competitor of Liemack/Reefer. From what I understand the fridges are still being made which makes me feel better in the event something should happen and I need mine fixed. As for your comments about the foam, that doesn't make sense either. I would have thought insulation properties are based on the thermal rating of the urethane foam not how it is poured or injected. I don't know much about a Danfoss or a Mitsubishi either, but on a recent visit to Malaysia last year most of the fridges there are now being manufactured with rotary compressors, there must be a reason for that, especially in that climate. Again 70% doesn't necessarily make something better, it may mean more money has been spent on advertising a lemon.
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Follow Up By: David - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Thanks Terry,
That is the type of stuff I was after. It appears that people either love or hate what they own and everybody wants to be an expert. The fridge wasn't working the way it used to so as with everything it needed a process of elimination. First I got the fridge checked, next I got the cars charge system checked and finally took the car and fridge(connected) to the factory tonite. Spent an hour or so there no charge.( Not bad when you consider they really didn't have any responsibility for the unit considering it was a different company when I bought it!) Anyway the technician had meters and wires connected checking and checking and then he found a solder joint not holding, the battery cutout was not calibrated(the unit thought it had 11v when it actually had 12v so it fooled itself into shutting down. The earth went to the body,not back to the battery. So now I am going to rewire over the weekend and hopefully fix my problem. Based on the tests done while I was there I should easily get 20hrs out of each battery. Fantastic backup for sure!
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Terry the tests were done by Australian Defence Industries a NATA Certified lab. Basically what you are trying to say is that they are a mob of vested interests and making Liemack/Reefer look bad. The reason it looks bad in the tests, is because the Liemack/Reefer is a poor performer in real life, and consumes large amounts of power, which is nearly three times more than the other brands. The fridge cycles repeatedly, and the graph is like a jagged saw tooth hungry shark. The only one other fridge that had this type of graph is the Vitrifrigo, and nowhere near as bad as the Liemack/Reefer.
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Reply By: Mack - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Firstly David, the best response from your Liemack will be if it is connected up and used as recommended in the owner manual. Twin 10mm cable as supplied with the fridge should be connected direct to the battery(s) Twin batteries should be connected in parralel with NO solenoids or other devices used. The Liemack is the ONLY fridge with a proper battery monitoring and cut out facility built in. Unlike the other so called ' battery protection' promoted by others, the Liemack can be induvidually set so that you establish your own safe low battery cut out value. I would recommend that you install twin 'Optima' batteries and conect as recomended and you will get about one and half to two days without recharge. (These batteries are initially expensive but work out cheaper than often replacing lesser batteries).
Secondly to respond to some misleading rubbish that formed some responses in this forum. The Danfoss BD3 compressor used by others (now BD 50 used in some bigger cabinets) is an excellent small compressor which like ALL recipricating and rotary compressors (except the defunct Italia Colda) uses ALTERNATING CURRENT NOT DIRECT CURRENT. The 12 volt DC is INVERTED into AC. (Have a look at the little black box on the Danfoss compressor!!!!! Next lets look at efficiency...All compressors have what is called a co-efficient factor. This is the amount of refigeration delivered from each electrical power consumed. The commonly used Danfoss BD 3 has a co-effcient (cop) factor of 0.92 while the Mitsubishi (Liemack) rotary has a considerably better cop of 1.07. (Manufacturers figures, Danfoss document CN.46.A1.02.) The Mitsubishi figures are then to have their efficiency decreased by the inverter loss factor which is .94. Therefore inverting to a higher AC voltage to operate a more efficient compressor can produce better results.
The Liemacks much more powerful compressor obviously demands a top power supply and often poor power supplies are misinterpreted as power consumed.
Next.. even the new most powerful 12 volt Danfoss (BD50) only produces 77 watts of refrigeration output while the Mitsubishi produces 119!!! The Liemack is the most powerful portable by a country mile and while it is running uses around 9 amps for each hour of operation while the BD50 would be using about 6 amps, but the Liemack is delivering so much more and has the grunt to keep refrigerating when the others are dying. With far greater refrigeration output, the bigger compressor obviously gets the job done quicker resulting in more off time. Claims that the Liemack uses three times the power of similar Danfoss powered units and that "mob Refrigeration Research has taken over Liemack" are blatant lies. Long established marine refrigeration system manufacturer, Refrigeration Research will provide parts and service for Liemack products and will be 're birthing' the Liemack concept shortly, but have NOT taken over Liemack!
So now some facts and hopefully some help for you David. Liemack like many others, had some isolated batches of insulation that failed after approx 18 months use. You may have an insulation problem but first do the following test (applies to any fridge) ... Time a typical 'on' period then 'off' period. Add these together then divide by the 'on' time to establish a 'duty cycle' percentage. If the duty % is asy 25%, divide this into the 9amp/hr rate to establish your actual hourly consumption. In this example the fridge consumes 2.25 amps / hr. Therefore if your battery(s) only delivers say 10 hours, this means you have got 25 amps only from it.
Next the most difficult thing to explain involves temperature and 'phase change'. This problem effects Liemacks more than others because with their digital temperature control and more powerful refrigeration capability, are more likely to be a the temperatures where this problem occurs. One previous reply correctly mentioned setting temp cut out a little higher for better results. Using water as an example, it takes one watt of refrigeration to lower one kilo of water one degree untill it starts the 'phase' change!!! Phase change is when the refrigerated product is changing status (goin' to ice! or even as this is attempted) This takes up to EIGHT watts per kilo to lower one degree. So if you have your fridge set so that it is near or attempting to phase change, you can be consuming huge ammounts of power for virtually no result!! So try running the temp up a bit higher and if you wish contact RR and instruction on altering the "differential' (and checking insulation) will be provided.
Finally may I suggest that tests done by "Build environs" Qld Uni in a situation where amateurs with advertising dollars were not involved, would find egg on a lot of faces!!
And for you only David, I will accept your reverse call if you think I can assist you. (phone number above the grill! ask for Mack)
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Follow Up By: Terry - Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00

Thursday, Nov 21, 2002 at 01:00
Mack/David

I feel better already, it sounds like the new Reefer "Mob" have done the right thing with David and sorted out his problem, and Mack's information which took sometime to absorb is amazing.
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Mack, talk about trying to defend the indefensible of a poor quality designed and manufactured fridge. Now you have to resort to misleading statements to try and cover up the poor design and performance of the Liemack/Reefer. Mack, stop trying to eschew the facts. One thing converting to a form of AC, they are not running a 240vAC invertor.
More misinformation:
"Liemack like many others, had some isolated batches of insulation that failed after approx 18 months use" Who are these other manufacturers that had insulation that failed? You are trying to cover up yet again the poor design, quality and manufacturing of Liemack/Reefer. Of course poured in foam would only ever be used by a 'back yard' style operation, as pressure injected foad will not get voids or fail, and is metered in, and consequently controlled.

How do you justify the *massive* weight of the Liemack/Reefer compared to other brands which all of course perform substantailly better than the Liemack/Reefer, and use three times less power. A whopping 34kg's for the Liemack/Reefer, against all the other better performing fridges in all areas are between 18kg and 23kg. Perhaps at the end of the day, the Liemack/Reefer could be a good boat anchor.

Who cares if your mob took over, bought or whatever to Liemack. Why did the original business fail, probably not enough sales due to their poor performance and massive power consumption. Why re-birth something which is so grossly overweight, has such massive power consumption, requires very expensive batteries to run, 10mm cable (un-believable!!!).

The Liemack/Reefer is obviously a fridge better left on the store shelves, as there are other brands which consume nearly three times less current, weigh 50% less, have superior insulation, do not require special overly expensive imported batteries, and perform well.
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Follow Up By: Rodeoowner - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Hey Mack. Are the results of the independant test you mentioned available?
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Follow Up By: Michael - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
HI Mack, Those Optima batteries you mentioned, Is there a specific model or is it just Optima. Do you know what the cold cranking power, plates and other relevant imfo. Who makes them and what do they roughly retail for? Thanks , Michael
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Follow Up By: Axel - Saturday, Dec 28, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Dec 28, 2002 at 01:00
Ozi,s off on his high horse once again,any one would think that he was paying for the power used by the fridge,
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Reply By: Ray - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Hi Mack,

Thanks for your informed technical reply to one of the most vexing problems regarding refrigeration. Most of the comments by oziexplorer (bit of a hide using that title in my opinion) are certainly misinformed and not just for this subject. It's one thing to have personal comments regarding products but to confuse them with incorrect facts is another. I had thought of buying a Liemack at one stage however was able to purchase a brand new 60 litre Engle for only $900. I am a technician in a thermofluids laboratory and concur with Mack's comments and theory regarding refrigeration. Not saying that the Liemack doesn't have faults I haven't tested or researched this unit so can't, unlike some, give specific references to this product. However the figures quoted by yourself (Mack) certainly seem more realistic to others and are based on on known theory. I'd have to concur with your view on testing procedures, I work for one of those places you mention and it is paramount that unbiased traceable data collection and analysis is conducted. Oziexplorer may have strong personal opinions regarding specific products however in my eyes lacks technical credibility when using exaggerated or misleading facts and data. Not really fair when others may use this forum to make expensive purchases. All I can say is as with other information sources, beware. Certainly by far the majority of users to this forum, that's why it's the best one to use, have general personal or credible responses to subjects that are very usefully. Sorry to change the tone of replies but I got to the point where enough is enough. Keep up the good work ExplorOz team and like minded subscribers.
Regards
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Ray, you rabbit off like an uninformed chook, because you do not like to read or hear the truth. What vested interest do you have in these Liemack/Reefer fridges?

My comments are not un-informed. I have in my possession, a comparative test on fridges done by a NATA Certified lab. The tests prove what a dog the Liemack/Reefer fridge is. It drew nearly 3 times the amount of power of any other fridge, cycled continuously up and down, weighs virtually double of all the other fridges, and the insulation quality of the Liemack/Reefer was also poor. What can you say, the Liemack/Reefer is a dog of a fridge - end of story!
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Reply By: Michael - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Hi All, Some very interesting comments have come from David's original posting. Some people seem to be little confused about wire sizing, it's 10 mm square (10mm2) not 10mm diameter, 10mm square i feel would be perfect for all fridges regardless of brand. Well if Liemack products are 'dogs', i'm keeping my dog because it works for me. It may or maynot draw a heap of power but who cares? Two big batteries, 100 amp alternator,big diesel engine to run it all, 60litres of cold food and 30 litres of frozen meat, PERFECT. Regards to all Michael.
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Follow Up By: Michael - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Hi again, I may have confused some out there, The wire size is 10 square millimetres and not as i have written above, 10mm square millimetres. There is a huge difference. Michael
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Follow Up By: Member - Nigel - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Optima batteries are the strongest and most advanced AGM (absorbed glass mat) batteries available. They are more robust than heavy duty batteries. They have 6 cells each with only 1 postitive and 1 negative plate - wound in a spiral.

They have very high CCA but where they lack is in their deep cycle ability, as they are only 55 Ah and they won't last for as many cycles as the better flooded batteries. That said they may very well outlast a flooded deep cycle battery due to their anti-sulphation & maintenance free design - flooded batteries die quickly if they water drops below the plates. Also optima's will take a physical abuse better than flooded batteries.

Another plus is that AGM batteries will accept charge faster than flooded batteries, so less recharge time needed from an alternator.

They are available in starter, deepcycle or marine, but as the deep cycle has the same CCA rating as the starter I reckon it would be the best option for most applications.
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Follow Up By: Michael - Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Nov 22, 2002 at 01:00
Thanks Nigel, regards Michael
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Reply By: paul - Saturday, Nov 23, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Nov 23, 2002 at 01:00
Whooaaa - planet earth to Nigel and Michael (pun), Optima have two models, the red one which is recommended for starting uses, and the yellow one in my kitchen hooked up to a steca regulator going to a solar panel on my roof to keep a trickle charge into it (i use for other things besides camp outs). It is a genuine deep cycle battery with a 65ah rating but amazingly also a 750Ca and 950CCA rating, which is why it is the perfect battery for winching (and starting any engine when the starting battery fails), also because of its advanced construction, it more than happily absorbs a high charging current - when getting low and i am not in a national park i whack it on my christie charger, have a couple beers and within an hour or so it is fully charged unlike for example a 100ah lead acid deep cycle battery which should only be charged at a current approximately 1/10th of its capacity - so charging it at 10amps is like just too many beers to drive home on, though seeing as it would take about 9 hours to fully charge (not bad math, you can't draw 100ah out of a 100ah battery) you would probably pass out or run out of beers.

If you want to know more just do a google search on Optima Battery and you will get dozens of sites and probably Optima's own site.

This topic is developing too much angst, lets move on.
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Follow Up By: Oziexplorer - Saturday, Nov 23, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Nov 23, 2002 at 01:00
I see Exide make a similiar battery to Optima a fair bit cheaper.
http://www.exide.com.au/pages/batteryrange.html
Then click on 'Orbital'
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Follow Up By: Member - Nigel - Sunday, Nov 24, 2002 at 01:00

Sunday, Nov 24, 2002 at 01:00
Umm - isn't that what I said?

Optima's recharge faster and for that any other reasons they may be more suitable for some people than higher capacity flooded cells (even though they won't last for as many cycles as a flooded battery would if it didn't die early from other causes).

And the red top is fairly irrelevant as the yellow top has the same cca
0
FollowupID: 4417

Reply By: Bat - Saturday, Nov 23, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Nov 23, 2002 at 01:00
I FISH WITH A MATE OF MINE WHO HAS A LIEMACK AND AFTER A COUPLE OF DAYS HIS BATTERY IS ALLWAY FLAT,WE THROUGHT THE BATTERY MUST BE DEAD BUT IT WOULD SEEM NOT.THE ENGEL JUST GO AND GO.FOR POWER USAGE THEY ARE MILES AHEAD,IT IS THE NEW MODEL WHICH IS HEAPS BETTER THEN THE OLD ONE WHICH I HAD.
AnswerID: 8865

Reply By: Bat - Saturday, Nov 23, 2002 at 01:00

Saturday, Nov 23, 2002 at 01:00
I FISH WITH A MATE OF MINE WHO HAS A LIEMACK AND AFTER A COUPLE OF DAYS HIS BATTERY IS ALLWAY FLAT,WE THROUGHT THE BATTERY MUST BE DEAD BUT IT WOULD SEEM NOT.THE ENGEL JUST GO AND GO.FOR POWER USAGE THEY ARE MILES AHEAD,IT IS THE NEW MODEL WHICH IS HEAPS BETTER THEN THE OLD ONE WHICH I HAD.
AnswerID: 8866

Reply By: Ozy traveling Aust.. - Friday, Dec 27, 2002 at 01:00

Friday, Dec 27, 2002 at 01:00
David,
I purchased a Liemack 50L Duel Temp fridge/freezer back in 1997.....
It runs on 2 x Delcor DT27 deep cycle batteries, they are wired in parallel and also backed up by a Solarex VLX80 solar panel mounted on the roofrack and separated from the vehicles (auto trans) starting battery by a Piranha DBE150S electronic isolater switch.

The duel battery system is fully self sufficient and monitored by the Liemack "cold logic" controll pannel, having enough power available at all times is no longer a problem and I don't have to remember to turn a "manual" isolater switch.

I go away fishing for weeks at a time and never have the hassle of no cold beer... I meet people with other 'popular' brands of fridges up north and they want to put their fish in my fridge 'cause it is colder... that say's something.

Any fridge will work in a cool to moderate climate, spend some time in the far north and you need reliable battery power for your fridge.

AnswerID: 10220

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