Overheating Troopie

Submitted: Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 16:52
ThreadID: 24393 Views:1902 Replies:7 FollowUps:12
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I have a problem with an overheating troopy. It's a 95 diesel with a 1HZ, 150,000 kays and just serviced. Even on mild days, towing my camper (1100kgs) up a steep hill (second gear high range), the temp dramatically rises. I stop for a minute and the temp falls. It gets worse, the more load I put on the motor.

I have been told the clutch fan may be to blame. There is fair resistance when I turn it by hand, but if I open the bonnet when the engine is really hot, the fan doesn't seem to be pushing out much air at all.

Assuming it was the clutch fan, I bought a vial of the toyota silicone oil. Problem is, I cant figure out how to get the oil into the viscous coupling.

I have checked the spring at the front of the viscous coupling, by applying heat. It turns a 1/4 turn and reverses when water is applied. Can I assume this is okay ?

In summary - 1. How do replace the silicone oil, 2. Is it worth replacing the whole fan (big $$), 3. Should I also replace the thermostat, just in case ? 4. Will my wife ever talk to me again, if the Troopy overheats 1/2 way up Cape York?

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Reply By: Horacehighroller - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 17:58

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 17:58
Peter J

See post 24380 regarding the fan clutch.

Good luck, Peter L
AnswerID: 118653

Follow Up By: Horacehighroller - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 18:03

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 18:03
I should also mention that blocked fuel filter, or fitting of a single CAV type fuel filter (without addition of electric fuel pump) will reduce internal injection pump pressure in MECHANICAL pumps which subsequently retards the timing.

When under increased load the effect is magnified - possibly causing overheating.

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FollowupID: 373812

Follow Up By: Peter 2 - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 18:31

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 18:31
I ran a cav filter in front of the tojo filter on a 1HZ troopy for 15 years and never had a problem.
From mid 90's Toyota fitted there version of one as standard in addition to the normal filter.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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FollowupID: 373816

Follow Up By: Horacehighroller - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 22:37

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 22:37
G day Peter 2,

North coast NSW Toyota dealer advised me that Toyota were prepared to instal electric pumps (under warranty) in the troopies with the dual filters if customers complained enough about lack of power. They were going to instal one in my (Y2K) HZJ 105 (single filter) at 21,000K because of an "hunting" issue at 1400 RPM which they dignosed as due to low internal pump pressure (didn't "hunt" when THEY tested the vehicle with the filter bypassed) but Toyota would only pay if vehicle originally had 2 filters (same motor though)

(Toyota eventually paid for new pump at 32,000K)
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FollowupID: 373875

Reply By: howesy - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 18:23

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 18:23
One vial is useless. It will either have a plug or be in two halves which must be dismantled. Impact driver best for cracking screws. wash it out and put three vials in and screw back together making sure first that the O-ring isn't cracked. Do this and you will think it's a new car.
AnswerID: 118656

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 19:28

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 19:28
they are in 2 halves an impact driver is essential
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FollowupID: 373821

Follow Up By: howesy - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 19:38

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 19:38
did it once with a large square shank driver with a shifter on it but it's a bit bodgy
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FollowupID: 373823

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 21:11

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 21:11
tried that way and rounded one of them - had to drill it out. Next week I did the fan on my other vehicle and looked up lo and behold right next to me in a shelf was an impact driver made the job easy
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FollowupID: 373848

Follow Up By: howesy - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 04:04

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 04:04
There is that risk, I seem to remember that I had my whole body weight over the driver to stop it rising. Matter of easy does it and if it don't look like it then buy or borrow an impact. happy motoring, not fun to do but the results are worth it.
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FollowupID: 373895

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 10:56

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 10:56
Im not called passion fingers for nothing. I actually found the whole process easy with the impact driver 4 bolt holding the fan on no belts to remove un do the shroud (dont have to pull it right out) then 8 screws holding the 2 halves one and a half tubes at 11 bucks a pop and done. best thing was I talked him right down coz it ran warm at the test run
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FollowupID: 373916

Reply By: The Rambler( W.A.) - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 19:43

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 19:43
Have had this problem with a previous Troopy and my advice is to change the fan regardless of cost as I am sure you will have no regrets---it sure as hell is a bit of peace of mind when you are thousands of k's from nowhere.
Bush camp

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AnswerID: 118664

Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 20:04

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 20:04
Peter,
I agree with what the others have said....However, I would also add that IMHO the amount of resistence you can feel when turning the fan by hand has no real bearing on whether the fan clutch is okay or not.
The other thing I found with the Nissan clutch, was that the large rubber "O" ring is made of some sort of 'funny' rubber.....once mine was exposed to the atmosphere, it extended by about 1" and was nigh-on impossible to refit.
Good luck
Roachie
AnswerID: 118666

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 20:08

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 20:08
Forgot to add.........have you had the radiator out to ensure it's not gunked-up with insects or grass seeds? Also, if/when you take it out, get the whole thing flushed out. I've had these issues with my GU and still don't think I've fully solved them; it still runs very warm when i give it a bit of stick. I've spent thousands $$$$ on it and nothing seems to have worked so far. I'm now down to rate of coolant flow as a possible cause.....might end up fitting an extra water pump (electric) to boost flow when pushing hard....have already fitted a huge aluminium radiator and the existing Nissan pump might not be powerful enough to move the extra liquid.
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FollowupID: 373831

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 21:14

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 21:14
heard about the o rings but after doing 2 I think it may be a nissan thing as I had no worries
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FollowupID: 373851

Follow Up By: trendy - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 23:16

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 23:16
Roachie,

Not trying to brag but the issue with my overheating is all but a non issue at this stage. 20 000 km since MTQ played with it and the worst I've got is 108 -110 c. Thats pushing really hard, but I will still wait to summer for the final word. Also I am not able to see you all in Birdsville due to work commitments, was trying so hard to get out there. Will have to catch up with you on another trip.

Didn't mean to hijack the post, sorry.

Regards Trevor.
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FollowupID: 374030

Reply By: Peter 2 - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 20:08

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 20:08
I forgot to add that i replaced the whole thermo bit as I wasn't aware that you could replace the silicon at the time.
Don Kyatt at seven hills sells a replacement unit, much cheaper than Toyota too.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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AnswerID: 118667

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 21:13

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 21:13
aftermarket ones are widely available at around 170 dollars
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FollowupID: 373849

Reply By: 120scruiser - Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 21:07

Sunday, Jul 03, 2005 at 21:07
This is what you are looking for.
toyota fan clutch silicone replacement
Three tubes at about 11 bucks each. Heaps cheaper than a new one.
AnswerID: 118681

Reply By: Member - Peter J (VIC) - Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:58

Monday, Jul 04, 2005 at 14:58
Thanks to all for the advice. I could have done the rebuild myself, but don't have a workshop or an impact wrench. I ended up taking the fan assy to the shell servo in Cooktown. Fifty bucks and two hours later, it was rebuilt. (Re Siliconed - 2 vials).
Thank you to the garage. Great service and a fair price. They were very busy, so I took the fan off myself, to save time.

I also bought a new thermostat (genuine $28, aftermarket $38..Figure that one out !!) and will fit it, if the reco fan doesn't solve the problem.

This afternoon, I put a plastic sheet over the front of the radiator grille and went flat out, down the highway, for ten minutes. Pulled over and the fan was pumping out heaps of air. The engine did'nt overheat during this time, so I guess the fan has to be working properly now.

As a footnote, I'm kinda happy I bought a troopie. The're as common as commodores up here and all the spares were easily available in Cooktown. I was going to buy a Discovery, at one stage. Would have had to wait for days, for spares from Cairns. Don't be offended Disco owners. Damn fine units, but there is a lot to be said for driving a 4wd that most other people drive, up north.

See you all up the Cape.
AnswerID: 118771

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