Bread camp oven tips & recipes wanted

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 18, 2006 at 21:09
ThreadID: 31881 Views:4058 Replies:5 FollowUps:10
This Thread has been Archived
Can anyone give me some cooking tips when cooking bread or damper in a camp oven.

Steve M
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Willem - Saturday, Mar 18, 2006 at 21:16

Saturday, Mar 18, 2006 at 21:16
Look at post 31848 on this page
AnswerID: 161401

Follow Up By: Willem - Saturday, Mar 18, 2006 at 21:27

Saturday, Mar 18, 2006 at 21:27
And 31867
0
FollowupID: 416143

Follow Up By: Steve M - Saturday, Mar 18, 2006 at 21:28

Saturday, Mar 18, 2006 at 21:28
Sorry , missed those ones

Thanks

Steve M
0
FollowupID: 416144

Reply By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 15:33

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 15:33
First, light a fire. Only tip I could think of.
AnswerID: 161509

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 17:29

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 17:29
haha, that's the spirit, onya Ruth :)
0
FollowupID: 416259

Reply By: Al & Mrs Al (Vic) - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 16:05

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 16:05
Hiya

I bake bread on nearly every camping trip we do, I use a commercial breadmix, you can get them already packaged with the flour and you add the yeast to it. The best tip I can give you is go easy with the water, better to add a bit more than have it really soggy to begin with, it's got to be moist but not too sticky [at least that's what I've found] tepid water works well. Knead the dough for about 10 mins, then what we've found works well, you put it into a campoven, a bit of cooking spray to keep things from sticking and put it in a warm place, inside the car works well, or in a tent, for about 2 hours or so, and then put it on some hot coals with coals on the lid and underneath, and let it bake for about 50 mins, keeping an eye on the coals [the control of the coals etc is not my job at camp, so I can't get too technical] if you have alook at it after 50 mins and give it a tap if it sounds hollow it's done, and then just tip it out and enjoy it.

I think we've done this about a dozen loaves now, and they've all been great.

Others may have different tips, but this works for us.

cheers

Lyn
AnswerID: 161517

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Mar 20, 2006 at 00:25

Monday, Mar 20, 2006 at 00:25
Lyn,

You have worded that pretty well. I do a similar thing.

One addition I can add, is in cold weather, I have placed the kneaded dough on top of the still warm engine to assist the rising process.

Whether in the Camp oven (coals, heat beads, or gas ring) or the cobb cooker, I get favorable results.

Oh and I always use a "log" style cake tin to put the mixed dough into.
Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 416320

Follow Up By: Al & Mrs Al (Vic) - Monday, Mar 20, 2006 at 08:21

Monday, Mar 20, 2006 at 08:21
Hi Sandman,

I did use a log style cake tin too, but then we decided to try just using the oven itself, depending on the size of the loaf being baked, we either use an oval oven or a round one, making either a Vienna style or a Cobb style, whatever, works great.

cheers

Lyn
0
FollowupID: 416331

Reply By: johannagoanna - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 18:24

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 18:24
We all have allergies in our house, so commercial bread is not an option, nor is commercial bread mix. I mix up a big batch of bread dough, in my breadmaker, at home, and then freeze it in potions, in snaplock bags (with lots of room for rising). When we go camping, I put the frozen portion in the fridge. When needed I take it out, defrost and let it rise, sometimes in the car on the way to camp, and then cook in camp over! This is very easy, HTH - Jo
AnswerID: 161529

Follow Up By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 19:16

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 19:16
Great idea!
0
FollowupID: 416279

Follow Up By: Ruth from Birdsville Caravan Park - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 19:18

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 19:18
When do you take it out of the breadmaker - no, forget that question - I think my breadmaker has an option for just kneading and proving but not baking. Right?
0
FollowupID: 416280

Follow Up By: RustyHelen - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 20:02

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 20:02
Brilliant johanna
We always start from scratch but this will be so much easier. We do the dough thing often for pizza at home but never thought of this add on.
Rusty
0
FollowupID: 416286

Follow Up By: Mr Fawlty - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 20:26

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 20:26
Now that is a good idea, I could also add some dried fruit as well & finish up with some fruitloaf...& I wondered why the breadmaker has just a "dough" setting....
0
FollowupID: 416288

Follow Up By: madcow - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 20:29

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 20:29
Probably best to put the mixed dough straight into the fridge or freezer to retard the yeast until you want to proove it and bake it. Most small bakeries do this the day before to "get a head start" first thing in the next morning When putting coals on the camp oven there should be more on the lid than underneath. We have nearly always made bread each trip just for the fun of it. Amazing what the price of a beer or two can get you. Commercial mix is the easiest but if you want to make your own it all comes down to time and patience. Generally 100% flour. 2% salt. 2-3% butter or oil, 1.5% yeast( or if you wish you could use some old dough saved form your previous mix and create a "sour dough loaf) and warm water. Chuck in a bit of garlic if you wish to add a bit of flavour. Bloody great mate!!

Cheers
0
FollowupID: 416290

Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 21:34

Sunday, Mar 19, 2006 at 21:34
Steve,

Can't give a lot of tips on mixing of dough, but you must keep the mix warm, and put a tea-towel, or something over the mixing dish, so the top of the dough doesn't "chill".

As for the baking, you need plenty of coals, well in advance. If you are in the north, or even western Qld, there is a tree that provides excellent cooking coals. It is Native Bauhinia, or Bean Tree(Lysiphyllum gilvum) Dry wood of this tree is brittle, and easy to break up.

I worked in stockcamps in the Kimberly, during the late '60's and early '70's, and most of the camp cooks could really make good bread, and bauhinia was their favourite wood. Trouble was the metho for starting the Tilley lamps was pretty popular too. Look out if they bought a bottle of cordial out to camp!

Hooroo...
Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 161573

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)