Toshiba 12 volt power

Submitted: Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 10:32
ThreadID: 32293 Views:2412 Replies:9 FollowUps:17
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Hi,

I want to run a toshiba lap top from 12 volts. Does anyone know what wattage is required?? Or what the min current output from the power pack should be?

Thanks
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Reply By: hl - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 10:44

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 10:44
They vary from 3 amps (older ones) to 5 amps. Older ones are 15 Volts, newer ones 19. The easiest way is to buy a cheap 150W inverter and connect the AC power supply through that to your 12V system.
Cheers
AnswerID: 163598

Reply By: Nifty1 - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 10:46

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 10:46
Depending on the model, the power packs are rated at anything between 1.5 amps and 4 amps, I'd expect the actual draw to be about 2 amps, so work on about 25 watts average. Check the details on the power pack - that will be a handy guide.
AnswerID: 163600

Reply By: Nebster - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 10:49

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 10:49
Hi

May pay to talk to your local service agent for Toshiba,
FYI I noticed REPCO had a 120volt Laptop power adapter from projecta in their latest cattledog for 40 bucks (says it suits most popular laptop brands)

HTH
Cheers
AnswerID: 163601

Reply By: phantom - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 11:00

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 11:00
Hi there,
I run a Toshiba laptop and use Targus converter. I find there products to be excellent including USB adapters, remote optical mouse. Visit there web site. Very helpful people to deal with.
Regards
AnswerID: 163604

Follow Up By: Member - John R (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 13:44

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 13:44
I'll second Targus products. They have outstanding after sales service. I broke my mouse/laser pointer after dropping it, and they sent me a replacement part that day - no question of warranty (it wasn't), and they didn't ask for any money. Thumbs up!

I'm getting one of those 12v adaptors in a couple of weeks. It'll be a Targus.
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FollowupID: 418378

Reply By: buckingfox - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 11:55

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 11:55
Have a look on the bottom of the laptop and there should be detail on the label telling you the amp draw and the voltage.

You can run an inverter and they are great for running other appliances e.g. battery chargers, laptops, whatever. However if you are running a laptop for gps/mapping then sometimes the plug connection to the inverter can come loose. Next thing you know you're running on battery power and the first indication is when the laptop goes into power save mode. Inverters are also not terribly efficient in this set up.

If you just want to run the laptop then you are possibly better off getting a dedicated 12V adapter. Targus are well recognised but can be expensive ($100.00+) and tend to be specific to certain laptop models. You can get cheaper units from some Internet tech stores that have variable voltage settings, I think I paid around $60.00 for mine. Maybe try www.techbuy.com.au.

I still carry an inverter for other stuff keep the 12V adapter for the lappy.

Hope this helps
AnswerID: 163617

Reply By: TerraFirma - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 12:01

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 12:01
Yes just look on the bottom of the laptop or the power adapter and it will state the correct voltage and current requirements.
AnswerID: 163619

Reply By: Austravel - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 12:40

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 12:40
Thanks all.
AnswerID: 163626

Reply By: Robin - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 13:34

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 13:34
You don't really need a power pack , you can connect it straight to 12V if you make up a cable. Parts from Jaycar. Need good cable of 1.2mm sq or better copper
area as you cannot have much volts drop else Laptop will slowly discharge
when engine off as have 12.5v When engine running no issue as have 14v

While a direct convertor is ok , they can generate interference into HF radios nearby.

Robin Miller
AnswerID: 163638

Follow Up By: V8troopie - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 14:48

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 14:48
Robin, your advise is rather limited. It certainly would not work on my Toshiba laptop (15V) nor on the newer ones running on even higher voltages.

Also, I wonder if all the voltage spikes commonly found on car wiring would do harm to the lappy internals. A DC to DC converter isolates the lappy from the car.
I have not found the Keiro converter I have causing interferance, maybe some do. I would try those clip on ferrite chokes on the power leads in that case.
Klaus
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FollowupID: 418398

Follow Up By: Robin - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 15:29

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 15:29
Hi Klaus

It certainly will work on the 15v Toshiba's , its what we use all the time , keeps the kids happy watching DVD's in the car.

These are fields I am professionally qualified in and I can asure you that the spike issue is overated , and much more likely to suffer damage from a low cost converter stuffing up.
The laptop itself provides a measure of protection as it internally downconverts the voltage even further and uses its own additional protection.

A low cost converter is better than a mains covertoer up and then down via laptops normal supply though.

The direct connection offers the highest efficentcy and the issue of EMC is often not one that can always be solved with the adition of a couple of chokes.

The only real issue , as I identified is the need to use reasonable cables , or keep them short as internal laptop battery doesn't charge well at 12.5v

Robin Miller

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FollowupID: 418410

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 18:13

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 18:13
Robin,

If you are professionally qualified in the Computing, or Electronics field, you have very limited qualifications buddy.

Just looking at a few other Laptops, the Compaq (HP) 6220 requires 18.5VDC input, the Dell Inspiron 6000 19.5VDC, the IBM Thinkpad 600X 16.0VDC.

None of these would even run from a 12.0VDC input source, let alone charge the internal batteries.

Further still, The Dell Inspiron will only charge its internal battery if it is connected to its specific power pack, whether fed from 120VAC, 240VAC or a 12VDC source.

So there are many variables to consider and therefore you are not providing accurate advice to help readers of this forum.

Me thinks you should perhaps change your day job?
Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
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FollowupID: 418463

Follow Up By: Robin - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 20:05

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 20:05
Read the subject line - it specifically refers to Toshiba laptops , as is my exact reply
above.

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FollowupID: 418488

Follow Up By: revhead307 - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 20:31

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 20:31
I've hardwired a 9.6V portable drill to a fused cig lighter plug to run on the car...it was a $5 drill from a garage sale and serves me well in the bush.

If you have got your Toshiba 15V laptop running on 12V and your willing to take the risk with your equipment then good for you.

However its not the best advice to give other people, laptops are sensitive equipment. Dismissing risk is fine for your own property...but giving advice to others should not be near enoughs good enough.

I run a 12V to 19V converter for my NEC.

I recommend either a decent quality inverter (has other uses) or a dedicated 12v stepup. Either can be sourced from Jaycar or ebay.

Rev
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FollowupID: 418504

Follow Up By: hl - Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 21:18

Wednesday, Mar 29, 2006 at 21:18
Hi,

I second Robin's advice.... The 15V Toshibas work just fine of the car and some of the little step-up gadgets leave a bit to be desired. The also run quite hot, meaning they're not all that efficient. A friend of ours blew up his Dell laptop with a faulty one of those. Some of them can too easily be set on the wrong voltage too. I personally run mine through a little 150W inverter, but only because it's there and permanently mounted. I have a power board connected to it in th back of the car, and anything that needs 240V just gets plugged in there.

Cheers

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FollowupID: 418521

Follow Up By: Robin - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 07:26

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 07:26
Hi There RevHead

In your follow up you seem concerned about possible transient spike
damage to electronic equipment, but then tell of your use of
9.6v electric drill used via a fuse to your car.

I have to say that this is not a good idea.

As you switch off the drill it generates a massive reverse voltage
spike and delivers it straight to the cars wiring.

The fuse offers you no protection.

I would add a hefty diode , wired backwards , across the drill to limit
the back EMF generated.

Robin Miller
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FollowupID: 418579

Follow Up By: Austravel - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:37

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:37
Hi Robin,

If the battery requires 15 V to charge how does this happen with the vehicles system being 12+ V??

Thanks
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FollowupID: 418647

Follow Up By: Robin - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:49

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:49
Hi Austravel

The lithium-ion batteries in the Toshiba's are only 10.8 V , this is why its no issue to
run them from 12.5 although they re-charge slowly. You get most re-charge from the 14v across the battery when the engine running.

If you don't mind messing around with making cables - give it a go , it only costs a few dollars and you can always get a convertor type if you don't like.

The computer will typically run 50% longer off battery with direct connection, which is comforting to know if kids like to watch dvd's late into night.

Robin Miller

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FollowupID: 418662

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 22:38

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 22:38
Just to reconfirm what Robin has said - I ran a 15V Tosh laptop off the car for a few years without any problems - directly from the 12 volt socket. Great system - nothing to stuff up.

Cheers
Phil
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FollowupID: 418810

Follow Up By: Austravel - Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 08:44

Monday, Apr 03, 2006 at 08:44
Thanks Robin, Phil. I may just do the same thing, certainly a lot cheaper.
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FollowupID: 419369

Follow Up By: Stevo - Tuesday, Apr 04, 2006 at 21:21

Tuesday, Apr 04, 2006 at 21:21
Robin, what exactly is required to make up a cable to run the Toshiba ??
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FollowupID: 419745

Follow Up By: Robin - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 08:11

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 08:11
Hi Steveo

Just a straight two wire connection from a cig lighter plug to a dc power plug.

The laptop dc power is an odd size with a 3.1mm centre pin e.g. Jaycar cat. PP0513

I use the lion brand cig lighter plug as its rated 15amp and has a short unterminated lead which makes it easy. Its available at lots of camping places but not from jaycar.

It has 4 copper plated contact points on its outside.

The main issue is to get a reasonably good cable into the plugs you need 1.0mm or greater copper area else laptop will not charge from 12v

The centre pin of both connectors is the positive.

We run three various model toshiba laptops here this way.

Robin Miller

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FollowupID: 419815

Follow Up By: Stevo - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 08:17

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 08:17
Thank you Robin.
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FollowupID: 419818

Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 09:42

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 09:42
If you want a Cigarette plug to be reliable, then you need to make sure you get one with a collar at the tip which holds onto the springs in the socket.

Contacts only work at high current if there is good pressure holding the contacts together and in a Cigarette Lighter the only thing applying pressure on the centre contact is the pressure holding the plug in the socket.

The collar also stops the plug falling out !

This only works for proper Cigarette Lighter Sockets that have the the reatining springs so the Lighter pops out when it is hot. There are cheaper sockets that are simpley a smooth brass tube that only use friction on the sides to apply the pressure.

Here is photo that shows "good" and "bad" Cigarette Lighter plugs and sockets.
ig Plug Socket>

Mike
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FollowupID: 419837

Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 09:43

Wednesday, Apr 05, 2006 at 09:43
Trying again for the picture link.
Site Link

Mike
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FollowupID: 419838

Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 07:20

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 07:20
I noticed a few Printers are now using 32 volt plugpacks - maybe this is so they won't be used off non-standrard power supplies which blow up the device - and are then claimed on warranty ?????.

Mike

AnswerID: 163797

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