Engel fridge works too well?

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:02
ThreadID: 32344 Views:3026 Replies:6 FollowUps:5
This Thread has been Archived
Hello all.

I am a new owner of an Engel 40L fridge freezer.

Having just bought this fridge I decided to try it out in case there were any problems. Plugged it into 240V and set dial excactly to the number two which is the setting my brother uses. Instead of running it empty I thought I would put in some bottles of softdrink.
After about two days the thermometer on the top read -3.02 degrees.......Bugger I thought thats too cold and all my drinks will freeze. so I opened the lid and its all good. Nothing frozen but really cold.

Now here is where it gets interesting.

I thought I might have a drink of lemonade. Grabbed the bottle, stared to fill the glass and WTF...... the neck just froze up and the lemonade stopped flowing. Not all the lemonade froze, only about a third but it was enough to stop the flow instantly.
I couldn't believe it. So I grabbed the cordial bottle. same deal except I could still get cordial out of it slowly. It didn't do it with the Orange Fanta though.

I am sure someone will have an explanation for what happened but it sure was freaky to see it happen.
How is it a drink can be realy cold but only when you pour or shake it it freezes before you eyes in an instant?

Regards
Sparkiepete
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:14

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:14
I find 1½ to 1¾ gives me cold drinks without freezing. If It's pushing over 40º I'll sneak it up to 2.

I have no idea about the freezing business but look forward to some answers.
AnswerID: 163859

Reply By: Member - Davoe (Widgiemooltha) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:28

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:28
common occurance except for me it happens with beer in the freezer. it is all about pressure. the carbonation keeps the can under pressure lowering its freezing temp in the same way that pressure raises boiling temp. release the pressure and the product freezes
AnswerID: 163861

Follow Up By: Member - George (WA) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 14:28

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 14:28
bleep Davoe, there is more to you than meets the eye. All said in good spirits
0
FollowupID: 418667

Reply By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:41

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:41
Hi Sparkiepete,

David is correct, a drop in pressure will lower the temperature, but that generally will only apply to the gas above the liquid. Over the pressure differences between and open or closed lemonade (or beer) bottle the pressure drop in the liquid will not be all that significant. If that was the only factor in what happened the lemonade would freeze on opening but not the cordial.

What's happening in this instance is that the drinks in the bottles were "supercooled." Water normally freezes when it is cooled below 0 degrees Celsius, forming ice crystals. Ice crystals form more easily when they grow on existing ice crystals. Water molecules like to pack themselves in place on a crystal that's already gotten started. It doesn't take much to start the crystallization process going - a little piece of dust or other impurity in the water, or even a scratch on the bottle are sometimes all it takes to get ice crystals growing. The process of starting off a crystal is called "nucleation."

In the absence a starting point, the water can get "stuck" in its liquid state as it cools off, even below its freezing point, down to as low as -20°C. The water will stay liquid until something comes along to nucleate crystal growth. A speck of dust, or a flake of frost from the screw-cap falling into the bottle are enough to get the freezing going, and the crystals will rapidly build on each other and spread through the water in the bottle.

Water releases 80 calories per gram when turning from a liquid to a solid. With your freezer only a few degrees Celsius below zero the specific heat of water is one calorie per degree per gram. This means that your drinks, as they it freeze, warm up the rest of the water until the process stops at 0 degrees Celsius, freezing perhaps ten or twenty percent of the water. This ice may be distributed throughout the bottle, though, as the crystallization process happens very quickly and heat flows slowly.

This is the same process that heats those packs with the metal disk/worm in them that appear at every show.

Cheers

Pete
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 163869

Follow Up By: Sparkiepete - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:58

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 12:58
Wow, That is taking a technical subject and explaining it to newbies to a whole new level.
Even I could understand that and that is saying a lot. ;-)
I knew I wasn't loosing my marbels.
Thanks for the comprehensive explanation. See I can use big words too LOL.

You are never too old to learn something new.
Thanks Pete

Regards
Sparkiepete

0
FollowupID: 418651

Follow Up By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:15

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:15
If your wife is into candy making she will tell you the same thing can happen when heating a sugar solution. Adding just one sugar crystal, or even stirring too vigorously will cause the whole pot to crystallize. Even though the solution is very hot, the high content of dissolved sugar means that the "freezing" point is also very high and rising as you drive off the water by heating.

I found out about the supercooled water thing talking to a mate who spent a lot of time in Antarctica. The water supply they had was liquid well below zero and they had to heat it as it came out of the lake to stop it freezing in the pumps.

Aint science wonderful.

Pete
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 418654

Follow Up By: Mad Dog (Australia) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:21

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:21
That must be very pure water Pete. It's a wonder some bugga hasn't bottled it.
0
FollowupID: 418655

Follow Up By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:30

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:30
Yeah, 10,000 year old glacier melt. The first tiem he was up there they had to melt all their water which was energy intensive, then someone found this lake under the ice. I can't remember all the details.

This is a video of the freezing process in action.
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 418660

Reply By: Member - Paul P (Bris) - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:03

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 13:03
Greetings

I run mine on 1.5. Anything at 2 or above and things start to freeze. As stated 1.5 and just under 2 will work fine with no freezing.

Regards

Paul
AnswerID: 163873

Reply By: Mav1 - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 18:55

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 18:55
Engel guys- does it matter how much they are loaded up at the time. What if it say full of cans which are getting replaced each afternnoon with hotties. I hire a 40 a couple of times a year and hover just over 2 and it seem OK
AnswerID: 163926

Reply By: the real chopper - Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 20:06

Thursday, Mar 30, 2006 at 20:06
We have a new 40 in a transit bag and run just above the 1 mark. The built in thermo is consistenatly 3 -3.5 deg above 2 other, trusted thermos in measuring air temp of the cabinet. At this setting we have the air temp between 1 and 1.5 deg.

(needless to say this is all done with high quality wiring and connections)
AnswerID: 163953

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)