* B&S Wire

Submitted: Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:04
ThreadID: 33490 Views:10942 Replies:10 FollowUps:13
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Well I am confused. I am looking to buy some thick wire in sydney and from the threads I have asked for 8b&S. Even Jaycar asked me what that was. I have searched the web and found several conversion sites who give different mm2 thicknesses of this wire. I just want to rewire the waeco direct to the battery with a fuse.

Any help please

Skinny
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Reply By: Russel & Mary - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:10

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:10
Skinny, I too am confused with mm2 automotive wire and how they work it out. I think that auto wire that's about 5 mm DIAMETER when the insulation is off should be about right. Rus.
AnswerID: 170404

Follow Up By: Member - MUZBRY VIC) - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:19

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:19
Gday
Just wander down to your local auto electrician and ask for battery cable..all will be fine...if you ask nicely and know the lengths ,he might even put ends on the wire ,just be nice to them and all will be well.
Muzbry
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Reply By: Skinny- Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:20

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:20
Thanks Rus, I am still looking. When I buy some it seems much cheaper to buy a roll. If anyone else would like some we could split a roll, whenI get the size. I think 8gauge is what they reackon can anyone confirm this.

Skinny
AnswerID: 170406

Reply By: Wizard1 - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:27

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:27
I need to re-wire an Anderson plug on my caravan. So I wnet to an auto electrician told him what I wanted to do he gave me the correct wire (80 amp I think it is). Up until that point I had wasted time at Repco etc.

Need a bus bar, I called the auto electrician had exactly what I needed.

AnswerID: 170408

Reply By: JohnN - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:27

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:27
Here is a table that may help

Site Link

cheers
John
AnswerID: 170409

Reply By: Member - Bradley- Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:36

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:36
8b&s would be 8 guage battery and starter cable for my guess.

any car audio store (jaycar / jb hifi / autobarn etc etc) will have 8 guage power and earth wire on bulk roll, buy by the metre. They will also have all the connectors and fuses etc.

But 8 guage would be almost overkill, you could get away with running 10 guage wire.
AnswerID: 170413

Reply By: davidta - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:40

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 12:40
Hi

B & S is Brown & Sharp.
It is also known as the American Wire Gauge or AWG.
There is also SWG or Standard Wire Gauge, which is different to the above.

Hope that helps

AnswerID: 170414

Reply By: blown4by - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 14:44

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 14:44
3mm, 4mm, 5mm etc refers to the cross sectional area not the diameter as it is actually measured in mm squared or square mm (sorry I can't do a little 2). I would think 5mm would do fine, about the same as you would use for your driving lamps and is probably heavier than what your vehicle uses on the alternator output.
AnswerID: 170450

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 15:51

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 15:51
mm² ?
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Follow Up By: Member No 1- Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 17:43

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 17:43
smart ass
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 23:52

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 23:52
sorry meant to add ..... alt + 0178
or go to Programs/Accessories/System Tools/Character Map
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Follow Up By: Member No 1- Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 07:38

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 07:38
I know 3
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 13:35

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 13:35
It wasn't for your benefit, it was for blown4bys!
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Reply By: Old Scalyback & denny - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 17:28

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 17:28
6mm twin red and black buy it from most car accessoriy stores is plenty big enough to run a fridge get the twin so that you run both positive and negative back to the battery get a good plug and plug top i use the 32v T type myself never a problem

steve
ps dont get battery cable for a fridge you will never get a plug to fit properly
AnswerID: 170480

Follow Up By: Skinny- Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:07

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 11:07
Hi Old Scalyback, can you explain "ps dont get battery cable for a fridge you will never get a plug to fit properly " ?

I think I know what you mean but could you spell it out for the slow types like me.

Skinny
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Follow Up By: Old Scalyback & denny - Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:04

Friday, May 05, 2006 at 19:04
goodday skinny
the size is the problem cable 1/2 ' thick you would need the biggest anderson plug about 200amps to suit something drawing about 10amps battery /welding size cables are for running electric golf carts etc

steve
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Reply By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 18:34

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 18:34
Hi Skinny

I supply 6mm2 tinned solar cable for fridge applications. 0.05 voltage drop over 6m. (Sold per meter)

It will fit the large yellow lugs if you are neat with removing the insulation and best to use a auto reset breaker around 20 amps to prevent voltage drop.

It is available at me of course ABR and also at springers, whitworth marine and bias boating. Repco only sell 4.8mm2 which is non tinned and not the best current carrying wire.



Regards Derek.

AnswerID: 170499

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 22:21

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 22:21
"0.05 voltage drop over 6m"

Derek, how many amps for this voltage drop?

Cheers
Phil
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Reply By: Geoff M (Newcastle, NSW) - Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 23:41

Wednesday, May 03, 2006 at 23:41
Skinny,
If you talk to an Auto Electrician they'll measure a cables overall diameter in millimetre's including the insulation or they'll measure the diameter of the conductor in Brown & Sharp Gauge (B&S) which is the same as American Wire Gauge (AWG)

If you talk to me or any other person with a mainstream electrical or electrical engineering background we'll measure the cross sectional area of only the conductor in square millimetres. The conductors are the only part of the cable that does the work.

For me, measuring the overall diameter of a cable including the insulation is about as relevant to its current carrying capacity as measuring the diameter of a stick to determine how much heat it will produce on a fire!
The insulation thickness from manufacturer to manufacturer is just too variable. Eg, Brand A and Brand B may both measure out at 5mm in diameter. Brand A's conductor may be 3mm diameter with an overall coverage of 1mm of insulation whilst Brand B's conductor may be 2.5mm diameter with an overall coverage of 1.25mm of insulation. Same accurate cable description, two significantly different current carrying capacities!!

For current carrying capacity of a cable used in extra low voltage installations (Extra Low Voltage for the purposes of our vehicle needs can be defined as below say about 48 Volts DC) quite a few factors need to be included,

1 - Cross Sectional Area of the conductor in square millimetres or diameter of the conductor in millimetres or diameter of the conductor in B&S or diameter of the conductor in AWG, all of them really must exclude the insulation.
2 - Number of individual strands in the conductors. The more the individual strands and the smaller their diameter the less the losses in the cable, the less the losses the better.
3 - Total length of the circuit including the negative leg for voltage drop calculations.
4 - Maximum expected current drawn by the load on the circuit.
5 - Maximum tolerable voltage drop at the load.

For practical purposes number 2 can be ignored if we use off the shelf multi-stranded cables. All of the other points really should be factored into a calculation!

Having said all that I use the same cable Derek from ABR lists above. I bought it from BIAS Boating in Newcastle. It actually does satisfy all of my points listed above for a load up to about 8 to 10 Amps and a circuit length of about 10 metres in total. (5 metres positive and 5 metres negative) I always wire back to the battery negative, never to the vehicle body or chassis. Note: I only calculated for 8 to 10 Amps when I worked mine out.

Geoff.

Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
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Follow Up By: blown4by - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 12:07

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 12:07
Now that is an answer from someone who knows his stuff. Pleasure to read:-)
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Follow Up By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 13:37

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 13:37
Geoff M
Learning all the time .. me!

Following all these threads/responses with much interest ............. however, can you advise (briefly0 why we shouldn't earth to the chassis ?

I have been advised [b4 OE started to consume my life !] that this was accepted ............. however, he was also not much chop as a fisherman either !!

Thanks
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FollowupID: 426067

Follow Up By: Geoff M (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 13:54

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 13:54
Hi Pedro,
Classy vehicle, obviously a discerning owner.

As I said, for me I always run the negative back to the battery rather than the chassis for a few reasons.
1 - I can control the quality of each connection easily.
2 - All connections are together in the one place and can be inspected quickly as part of regular maintenance.
3 - If I wish to disconnect or remove a circuit I know I've disconnected exactly what I want.
4 - It's my electrical background. It's far easier to fault find a single neutral connection point than half a dozen scattered points.

A clean and tidy chassis earth will work fine, the central point works best for me.

Geoff.
Geoff,
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Follow Up By: Geoff M (Newcastle, NSW) - Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 15:54

Thursday, May 04, 2006 at 15:54
Hi blown4by,
Thanks for the comment. Glad my little contribution was of use.

Geoff.
Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

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