Spare Fuel (Dieso) & Jerry Cans

Submitted: Friday, May 12, 2006 at 23:41
ThreadID: 33851 Views:2677 Replies:5 FollowUps:1
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Hi Guys & Gals,
Does any one know the regulations regarding the carrying of Fuel in jerry cans on a bracket on the back of a Caravan or trailer.
And does this vary depending in what State you are in (WA NT etc)
& is there a Web site with common links to information about this.
About to do a big trek north & the whole curcuit around Oz with a big van & it is cheaper to fit up a couple of Jerry Cans rather than an expensive oversize tank increase = to 2 Jerrys.
appreciate any help,
cheers
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Reply By: Exploder - Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 00:07

Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 00:07
I know they can’t be carried inside a caravan, don’t know about on the back of the van or 4By but, possible crash fire risk I suppose.

Inside a Trailer is Ok i would say.
AnswerID: 172416

Reply By: Member - Doug T (QLD) - Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 10:57

Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 10:57
I carry 180lts diesel under the bed inside my troopie and it gravity feeds to the front 90lt tank, If it were petrol then there is no way I would do that , Now I know there is going some people ready to pounce on me about the legallity of this so I am prepared ,so check link and take note of section 4.1.5 part B at the bottom about substances used for work , so diesel is a substance in my book
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AnswerID: 172468

Reply By: Footloose - Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 10:59

Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 10:59
AFAIK different states have different regulations on fuel carrying. Location, amount, restraint etc. Sorry I cant point you to websites but I know they exist. I wouldn't think that a couple of externally mounted jerries would be a problem but best to check I guess.
AnswerID: 172469

Reply By: Noel W (Qld) - Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 13:35

Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 13:35
Hi Don

I went through this process a couple of months back and asked the same questions of RACQ Insurance who stated that whatever the DOT says is OK by them.

I then approached local DOT Office and after they went through several online searches of their own documentation and phone calls to Brisbane (took about 20 minutes), the short answer turned out to be 200 LTRS. Sorry I cannot provide any links to the "written word".

Hope this helps
AnswerID: 172498

Follow Up By: Noel W (Qld) - Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 13:51

Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 13:51
Sorry ... I should have included that my inquiry related to transportation of fuel (not gas) inside or on top of / external of a vehicle. Not sure if this will have a bearing on the answer you are looking for in relation to caravans or trailers.

Cheers ...
0
FollowupID: 428112

Reply By: Richard & Leonie - Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 17:54

Saturday, May 13, 2006 at 17:54
I went through the exercise last year to try and find out the rules concerning carrying extra fuel. I rang the NSW RTA and was told there are Australian Road rules concerning signage of what a vehicle was carrying in respect to certain dangerous goods but it only applied to commercial bulk vehicles. As far as a car carrying fuel externally, (roof rack or jerry can carrier) the only rule I could be quoted was one that it had to be securely fixed to the vehicle so it could not come loose and fall off. I must admit I do think there should be rules, especially in relation to vehicles carrying fuel as the rear. It is dangeous in the event of a rear end collision. American design rules were changed years ago forbidding fuel tanks between the back axle and rear of the car.This came about after a number of serious fires after rear end collisions. I suppose Kaymar would not sell a rear carrier for fuel cans if it was illegal.
I can stand to be corrected but I believe in NSW a garage is not permitted to fill or allow a customer to fill a jerry can (or other holder,) over 20 lts capacity.
Richard
AnswerID: 172544

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