Alternative firewood

Submitted: Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:00
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Have been looking for an alternative to firewood to take on a trip where there is no wood laying around. I have come across Hotrox in SA made in WA, Envior logs & Rediflame fire logs in Vic & Fire-up fire logs that don't seem to be made anymore. Most of these types of logs are more for heat than fire & last longer than natural wood & are easier to store in the trailer. Any suggestions for alternatives to wood would be appreciated.

cuffs
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Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:12

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:12
If you drive a ZD30 patrol - you can just burn that could 't you? LMAO! - DUCK!

Nah I'm really keen to see if anyone has any suggestions, fire wood is so space hungry! We try to take a couple of bags and even that's a struggle, we always have to end up buring some of the wood laying around in the bush.
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Follow Up By: Doggy Tease - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 21:34

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 21:34
just dont burn the surf,,,,too much plastic....lol.

seriously tho jeff,,,,we do the same,,,take it with us,,,but, damn its heavy, and some bugger usually pinches a bit every time we go away..

meow.

rick.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 22:15

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 22:15
OOoooowwch. Yeah I can cop that on the chin, I deserve it. However I'd dare say the ol' surf has a hell of a lot less plastic than any of these new 4by's. It's a jap import, it's full of chrome!! Hell I think they'd make the steering wheel out'a chrome if it was legal!! :-O

Nah, the surf wouldn't burn, since I've had my hands in it over the years it's made up of 90% silicone rubber now! LMAO!

Just don't spill turps anywhere near it, it'll fall apart! (like the blues mobile!)
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Follow Up By: Doggy Tease - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 22:32

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 22:32
onya jeff,,,,and one day you gotta tell me where photo #1 is,,,,,,,lol.

meow.

rick.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 22:39

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 22:39
I've PM'd you a site with the GPS wayponts.
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Reply By: Maddmav - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:29

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:29
Cuffs

I know of a person who gets all his junk papers from the mail - rolls them tight and puts an elastic band around them - then soaks them in water (to bind them more) and uses them in his fireplace in the house.

They work well and burn for a while too!!

Good way to get rid and make good use of the junk mail as well.

Vinnie
AnswerID: 179214

Follow Up By: djpatrol - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:53

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:53
GEE,S man im glad I dont live next door to him you would SUFFOCATE

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Follow Up By: greydemon - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 15:09

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 15:09
I have heard of people doing this with wire - surely an elastic band will just give way at the first sign of a flame. Also, and I am sure that you meant to mention this .... you have to dry them thoroughly before you use them!
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Follow Up By: Member - Darren T (VIC) - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 18:00

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 18:00
My mate used to make his own fire fuel using this method. Use to soak newspaper and junk mail and then compress it in a mould to squeeze out excess moisture and leave to dry out. The end result was a brick shaped paper "log" which would burn very similiar to heat beads in a fire.
He had worked out different ratios of paper to junk mail for fast burning logs, logs that would burn hotter, ones to start fires etc etc.
I reckoned he just had too much time on his hands.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 22:10

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 22:10
Spot on Darren T
The mould used to be sold by Bunnings etc , but haven't seen it around or advertised lately. Tip - Shred your newspapers and soak in a solution of water & citronella - helps keps the mozzies away - it works TIP - make sure it is completly dry before use - easy to make & easy to transport
Cheers
Mike
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Reply By: Mr Fawlty - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:56

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 13:56
I have 2 bags of steaming coal left over from my days as a steam boat nut...Yours for the asking....
AnswerID: 179223

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 14:40

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 14:40
Funny that you mention steaming coal , I was out at the Swanbank power station for some reason or another a few months back ,the system for the coal is train unloads then loader loads semi trailer for short trip to actual power station ,anyhow I picked up some of the coal that falls of the back of the trucks to show my young fella what coal looks like , now point of the matter is I cannot for the life of me get this stuff to burn , how do I get the coal to ignite ??
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Follow Up By: chump_boy - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 14:49

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 14:49
Don't quote me or anything Alloy, but I think you need to crush it down into smaller particles, and introduce lots of air. Either that, or add it to an existing camp fire.

I vaguely remember reading something about it a while ago.

Cheers,

Chump
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Follow Up By: Member - Crazy Dog (QLD) - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 19:46

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 19:46
Funny you should mention this subject. Just been thru the exercise and settled on heat beads.

My thoughts ok!

Grrr!!!
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Follow Up By: Mr Fawlty - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 20:39

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 20:39
Chump is on the money, add it to a fire or start a fire & put it on top. It gives great coals and does a damper like you would not believe...
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 19:51

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 19:51
cuffs,

Surely the products you have listed ARE the alternative.
They are readily available in hardware stores such as Bunnings and places like Rays Outdoors. My corner IGA Supermarket even sells them.

"Most of these logs are more for heat than fire....."
Mate, surely that is what a camp fire is for, to generate heat for cooking, or warmth.

I used this "log" product recently for several camp fires and found them to be excellent. The cost of just under $10 per bag is not an outrageous outlay and they are certainly more transportable than wood.

Great product IMO.
Bill


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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 19:55

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 19:55
Just one additional comment.

The logs create coals just like wood does and in this way are superior to heatbeads for a camp fire.
Bill


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Reply By: eerfree - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 20:40

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 20:40
Any one know what these alternative products are made of, reconstituted sawdust,coal,kero soaked sand?---thats a bit wild hey!

eerfree
AnswerID: 179321

Reply By: Old Bushie - Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 23:34

Monday, Jun 19, 2006 at 23:34
I use charcoal if going to areas where firewood may be scarce. It is bulky but very light. 1x20kg or 2x10kg bags are fine on the roofrack and pretty cheap. Expensive at Bunnings but most capital city Yellow Pages will lead you to a commercial supplier.

Charcoal takes a bit longer to get going with kindling or firelighters but lasts well, gives great coals for cooking and we chuck a bit of precious wood on top if we want to do a bit of firegazing. Later at night a bed of red coals with a few twigs on it now and then doesn't kill your night vision for enjoying "the serenity"

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Reply By: Nick R - Tuesday, Jun 20, 2006 at 08:44

Tuesday, Jun 20, 2006 at 08:44
Anyone ever take briquettes? they're not too expensive and fairly dense.....
Thoughts?
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Jun 20, 2006 at 12:12

Tuesday, Jun 20, 2006 at 12:12
Interesting post. As most of you will know, David and I love our campfire, however we, like everyone else, invariably find that there are places and times when a campfire just isn't practical or allowed. Without the firewood to make the campfire, you'll also have to use a different method of cooking, so why not consider a Cobb - I tried one for the first time when on our Tassie trip and backed it up with the trusty camp oven, and I amaze myself to say that it is actually more versatile than the camp oven and a damn excellent device. The heat beads usage is very minimal - 3 beads will do it, and you can cook a 2 course meal, boil water for dishes and coffees and sit around it like a campfire for warmth. Obviously there is initially a slight kero smell when you use a firelighter to ignite the heat beads but this soon disipates and in fact you can buy heat beads with "aromas" for a more smokey effect, but the regular heat bead is fine. Overall when you compare the options the Cobb is both a heat and cooking alternative that is ideal for the situation you are preparing for. Obviously, you wont get a burning campfire flame if that's what you're after though but making compromises is what all this travel caper is all about isn't it?! Enjoy! Where are you going?
Michelle Martin
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Follow Up By: BBB - Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 at 19:46

Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 at 19:46
Ebay has a heep of the Cobb bbq's onsale at the moment I picked one up for $113.00 they are great.

BBB
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Follow Up By: Steve - Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 at 20:42

Wednesday, Jun 21, 2006 at 20:42
Michelle,

Enough room to feed two grown ups and two hungry boys on those things?
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Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 12:26

Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 12:26
Hi Steve,
Yes, on our Tassie trip when I tried it out, we often fed 4 adults and one of them is David so that counts for 2 adults! ha ha have you seen him?! Big guy :-) Plenty of room for steaks/chops etc on the grill plate, or do a 2kg roast, or a couple of those cyovaced marinated split chickens you can get from the supermarket, or I carry a 6L round glass pyrex bowl with lid that I used to make a casserole in it. YOu can even make Pizzas. The heat beads last for hours, so you can cook one whole dish and then do another if necessary, eg. cook 2 pizzas.
Michelle Martin
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Follow Up By: Pajman Pete (SA) - Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 13:16

Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 13:16
We take our Cobb everywhere when camping. To get it going really quick just put the basket with the heat beads on the gas ring (we use our Coleman dual fuel). The beads are ready to cook in under 10 minutes, you don't need firelighters and there is no kero smell. Just be careful moving the basked to the Cobb.

They do make a great heater.

Cheers

Pete
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Follow Up By: Steve - Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 14:22

Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 14:22
cheers Michelle. Maybe Santa will bring me one. I've spent up on car accessories for this trip but they do sound good. Like the idea of pizzas too.

btw, wasn't sure whether David was a big guy or the rest of you were midgets looking at your photo ;-))
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Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 14:35

Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 14:35
Ha ha, both is true actually. I'm only 5" 2 and 3/4 inches!! whilst David towers over a foot taller.
Michelle Martin
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Follow Up By: Steve - Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 14:51

Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 14:51
Like the way you shortys always get that vital 3/4" in. lol. Every bit counts eh?
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Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 14:57

Thursday, Jun 22, 2006 at 14:57
Absolutely!and i've very proud of my 3/4! :-)
But I am wondering why I've shrunk half a shoe size lately?? Went from a size 7 to a size 6 and a half!
Michelle Martin
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