Kosciusko

Submitted: Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 11:44
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Two girlfriends and I are planning a trip to Australia the week of March 17-March22. We would like to climb Kosciusko and hike in the Snowy Range a little. Will that work with the fires that have been there recently? Do we need a 4wheel drive vehicle to get around?
Thanks.
annelutz@earthlink.net
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Reply By: flappan - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 11:53

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 11:53
Check out the National Parks website

http://www.npws.nsw.gov.au/news/firenews.html

Generally, No you don't need a 4wd to get to Kosi. Its all sealed bitumen road to thredbo, and you walk from there.

The fires haven't effected Mt Kosi itself and the walks are still open.

I haven't been up there recently, but I've been told that on Kosi you hardly notice the fires at all, simply because it wont burn that high up.
AnswerID: 14048

Follow Up By: Anne - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 12:13

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 12:13
Dear Flappan,
I have been to that site and that was what alarmed me. Is it safe to drive there from Sydney? Also can we camp out? And can you recommend any compsites or accomodations in the area?
Thanks so much for your reply.
Anne
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Follow Up By: Bruce - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 16:32

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 16:32
Oz in a week.........Hope you get over the jet lag ok, spend a day in Sydney and go on a harbor boat cruise to relax, visit the Opera House, Sydney Botanical Gardens and some shopping in The Rocks.

Remember they drive on the other side of the road and have umpteen speed cameras.

Have at least one spoonful of Vegemite a day and you'll be fine.

I"m an Aussie living in San Diego and actually going home from the 15-25 March.

Hope you have heaps of fun.

Bruce
cycadcenter@msn.com
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Reply By: flappan - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 12:46

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 12:46
I made a phone call to NPWS for you.

The walk to Kosi from Thredbo is fine.

There is camping available near Thredbo. Thredbo River, Island Bend, and Thredbo Diggings.

There is absolutely no problems with getting from Sydney to Thredbo. No fires in that area.

There are some fires on the Victorian side, whilst no concerning the safety of Thredbo etc etc, with the right winds, the smoke is blowing over Kosi. More a pain then a safety concern.

I would suggest when you get into Sydney phone the NPWS office at Jindabyn (near Thredbo) on (02) 6450 5600 for a current update.
AnswerID: 14053

Reply By: Member - Rohan K - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 12:47

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 12:47
Anne, unless there are fires still raging enroute, the drive from Sydney will be fine. You can get around most of the patk with a 2WD and really only need a 4WD for some of the serios 4WD tracks. We spent 3 weeks there in January and never engaged 4WD, even on many tracks designated 4WD (mind you we had perfect weather).

The walk to the top of the mountain was closed in January due to a bushfire (one of many) at Dead Horse Gap (DHG), just south of the maountain. I don't believe that fire is still an issue. The fires did not directly effect the walk to the top, but did a lot of damage around DHG which, before the fire was a fabulous walk.

Even if some areas are off-limits there will plenty of others you'll be able to access. Just contact the NPWS in Jindabyne before you arrive to get details on where you can't go, or which areas are fire damaged and to which you may not want to go.

A great spot to camp while in the Thredbo area is at a site about 1 km inside the park gates at Thredbo Diggins. This site has both tent based and caravan/trailer based areas (separated). There's also another good site 1 km further on (towards Thredbo) which is tent based camping only. They are both adjacent the Thredbo River and have some good short (2 hour) walks. Other than that, the rule in the park is that you can camp pretty much anywhere as long as you are out of sight of any roadway and not within 100 m of a water course.

It was stunning there in January and far "greener" than I had expected. Hot in the lower areas during the day but very cold at night (near zero degrees), particulary in the higher regions, so be prepared. There were still patches of permanent snow on the way up Kosciuszko.

Enjoy!

AnswerID: 14054

Follow Up By: Anne - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 14:37

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 14:37
Dear Rohan,
Thanks for theinformation. I am greatly relieved by your note. I have done a lot of mountain climbing in the US so will be prepared for the cold, just not for the heat and drought.
Are there any concerns with snakes or other sorts of insects or animals? Australia has a great reputation for its wilderness. I can see that its people are just as I have heard--very helpful and friendly. Thank you so much for your kind comments and help.
Anne
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Follow Up By: Member - Rohan K - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 15:11

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 15:11
I hope you find us all that way (helpful and friendly) when you're here.

Whislt we were in Kosciuszko, there was much talk about the number of snakes around. Apparently they were all coming out of the bush seeking the ever decreasing water. Other campers told us various stories about their encounters but we did not see a live one in 3 weeks. We saw several signs of their presence while doing some of the walks mentioned above and one was killed by a vehicle one night in the Thedbo Diggins campsite, but that was it.

Many of our snakes are very dangerous but not very aggressive unless cornered. Usually, campers and walkers make so much noise (from a snake's percpective) that any that are around take off long before you get near, or even see them. Having said that, you should always take care, wear appropriate clothing and never approach a snake if you see one. There are plenty of good books on our "dangerous creatures" but if you choose to read one, don't let it scare you off coming to explore our fabulous wilderness.
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Follow Up By: Flappan - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 15:13

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 15:13
Anne, yes there is a concern for snakes. I think we have 9 of the 10 most poisonious snakes in the world.

However, don't be overally concerned. They are more afraid of you, then you should be of them. They wont have attack you. Snakes do not attack unless provoked. If you see one, stay right away from it. Walk in the opposite direction.

Insects aren't a huge drama over here. Few Mossies and Sandflies, but you wont catch any deadly diseases from them.

The only animal concerns are the Dropbears. Like big Koalas, with HUGE fangs. They particurily like Yanky Tourists ;)

Nah seriously. Nothing Major. I wouldn't be patting Kangaroos or Koalas or Dingos in the Wild though. Go to a zoo if thats what you want. They may be cuddly looking, but they can make a nasty mess as well.
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Follow Up By: Bruce.H - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 16:23

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 16:23
Hi Anne
the most dangerous animal we have here in australia is not native to this country it was breed in the 80s as across of 2 specis to provide protection for our wilderness areas but it turned out to be very agressive & tended to protect its domain by agressivly attaching any person who tried to enter,it was very mean & nasty leaving any who incountered it the worse for ware fortunatly the land managers realised what they had created was dangerous & unexceptable to the public,they have now begun to cull & cross bread this animal with a 3rd specis & the results have been extremly encoruging the animal; is now much more open to visitors far less agresive & quite plesant to encounter
seek out one of these when you visit our shores it can make your holiday very rewarding
by the way the animal i speak of was a cross between a park ranger & a greenie this has now been further crossed with an eco tourist giving us the current crop of park rangers, give them a call apon your arrival they will be most helpful
Regards Bruce
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Reply By: Member - Mal - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 16:13

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 16:13
Anne,
I agree with the above replies. When you go to the National Park Headquarters ask the rangers about the wildlife in the area and just for a joke tell them you have been warned about the (non-existent) "drop bears" and ask to see an information sheet on them. Should give them a laugh.
Mal T.
AnswerID: 14074

Reply By: Member - Mal - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 16:13

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 16:13
Anne,
I agree with the above replies. When you go to the National Park Headquarters ask the rangers about the wildlife in the area and just for a joke tell them you have been warned about the (non-existent) "drop bears" and ask to see an information sheet on them. Should give them a laugh.
Mal T.
AnswerID: 14075

Reply By: Truckster - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 17:43

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 17:43
First thing, when you get to the park report to the rangers what you are doing... when you will be where, when you will be back...

So if your not back, people can go thru your things.... err I mean come lookin for you.. :P

Sydney to Kosi is a day run easy.
AnswerID: 14088

Reply By: Drew - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 21:04

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 21:04
Check out www.accommodationspecialists.com.au and email Jenni for any local assistance. Jenni and her husband work at Kosi and have more local knowledge and are very helpful.
AnswerID: 14102

Reply By: Beddo - Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 21:58

Thursday, Feb 27, 2003 at 21:58
Make sure you go see the Blue Mountains aswell to the west of Sydney, particularly areas arounf Blackheath and further to the west around Oberon at Kanangra Walls.

If you are down at Kozi NP - be careful of the Snow Snakes or sometimes called Hoop Snakes. When skiing you cannot see these snakes as they are white and hide in the mogules - when you disturb them they can actually spring up and they bite the end of their tails to form a hoop - they then roll down hill after you - so be careful !!

On the beach we also have white pointers so be careful of these aswell - but that's another story - if you have seen any of Paul Hogans original Aussie comedy shows you would know what I mean. Enjoy your trip downunder.
AnswerID: 14112

Reply By: Member - Colin- Friday, Feb 28, 2003 at 00:27

Friday, Feb 28, 2003 at 00:27
this is the latest info off the NPWS web site
- Kosciuszko National Park Fires started by lightning strikes have had a major impact on the park. Progressively, various walks and facilities will reopen as areas are assessed.
The following areas are open:
Tourist facilities at Perisher, Thredbo, Charlotte Pass and Cabramurra

Talbingo Reservoir
Yarrangobilly Caves
Campgrounds, picnic areas and other attractions along the Snowy Mountains Highway, in the Long Plain and Currango areas, including:
Blowering foreshore
Long Plain and Cooinbil huts
Ghost Gully campground
Bullocks Hill
Tantangara Dam
Three Mile Dam
Yarrangobilly Dam
Rock Flat
O’Hare’s campground
Areas around the Park including Khancoban, Adaminaby, Talbingo, Providence Portal, Anglers Reach, Old Adaminaby, Kalkite, Tumbarumba, Batlow and Jindabyne
The following walks are open:

Snow gums boardwalk at Charlotte Pass

Pallaibo Track
Porcupine track at Perisher
Rainbow Lake walk at Dainers Gap
Mt Kosciuszko from Charlotte Pass or from the top of the Thredbo chairlift
Main Range track – camping permitted
Dead Horse Gap track
Thredbo River track
The following areas remain closed:

All facilities along the Alpine Way
All other areas of the park not listed as open above
AnswerID: 14125

Reply By: toonfish - Saturday, Mar 01, 2003 at 00:28

Saturday, Mar 01, 2003 at 00:28
gotta love fair dinkum aussie bush humour.
any way being a well heeled walker through that region make sure if you camp out ie -Thredbo river rug up because it easily gets to -5 there that time of year if conditions are right and sunscreen and plenty of water during the day.
say hi to the galaxias for me.
small mountain fish (bugger to scale and fillet LOL)
great views and fresh air .
do the hard walk uphill from thredbo or the crackenback chairlift.
go on the steel tobogan run.
cheers
AnswerID: 14208

Follow Up By: Anne - Saturday, Mar 01, 2003 at 11:02

Saturday, Mar 01, 2003 at 11:02
Dear Toonfish,
Looks like I have some new words to learn. Is -5 in degrees Fahrenheit or Celsius? I am praying it is not Fahrenheit, cuz that is what the temperature is here right now and I would not camp out in this.
Does steel toboggan run mean that here is snow this time of year?
Are there scorpions? Do I need to worry about snakes getting in the tent? I have done a fair amount of desert camping in the US and usually here you don't have to worry about snakes if you are above 5,000 feet.
Be kind.
Anne
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FollowupID: 8512

Reply By: toonfish - Saturday, Mar 01, 2003 at 14:37

Saturday, Mar 01, 2003 at 14:37
hi anne
No its not fahrenheit here its degrees celsius here Idont think you will have to worry about snakes too much but depending on where you are walking i would suggest gaiters and clean your boots to stop the spread of gorse and weeds which are becoming a real pain in some areas.
you need to download or get a converter for temperatures.
have fun
AnswerID: 14237

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