tyre repairs

Submitted: Monday, May 26, 2003 at 20:28
ThreadID: 5131 Views:1676 Replies:7 FollowUps:7
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has anybody used tyre pliers or r & r beadbreaker?
if so how do they compare?
thanks,
tony
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Reply By: Member - Ian - Monday, May 26, 2003 at 20:48

Monday, May 26, 2003 at 20:48
Tony, I have used both and both do the job well but I think Tyrepliers are a bit harder on the bead when breaking it off the rim where as the R& R Beadbreaker replicates the machine tyre removers at the tyre shops. The beadbreaker works even better if you put a small thrust race under the drive nut (you'll see when you buy one). I bought a beadbreaker. Ian
AnswerID: 21134

Follow Up By: Stevo - Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 08:32

Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 08:32
Ian, what is a thrust race ?? (I use an R & R)
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Reply By: member-JB1 - Monday, May 26, 2003 at 20:57

Monday, May 26, 2003 at 20:57
Tony, I also meant to say beadbreakers also can be used to refit the tyre making it quicker to get a No.6 (beer) Ian alias JB1
AnswerID: 21136

Reply By: Voxson (Adelaide) - Monday, May 26, 2003 at 21:12

Monday, May 26, 2003 at 21:12
Tyrepliers is the one i use. I find no probs at all breaking the beads using this tool on a standard rim but when doing sunraysias 8", i find it hard to break the bead on that because the bead area is so long on the rim.....
I think breaking the bead is the easy bit compared to removing the tyre and refitting another...
Not impossible, just an adventure.. You will find out... But if there is a beadbreaker that doubles as a tyre remover and fitter,, i would be buying that one for sure.. Even if it is more dollars......

Regards,............._____________________________________________
Countin the days till July 5th. *Cape York Trip*
_____________________________________________
AnswerID: 21139

Follow Up By: Member - Richard- Monday, May 26, 2003 at 21:29

Monday, May 26, 2003 at 21:29
I once had a flat on my motorcycle and was miles from anywhere but had a spare innertube. A 4wd guy stopped to give me a hand fix it. Whilst a motorcycle tyre is not as hard as a 4Wd tyre to move the bead off the seat this guy had the answer. He just drove his front wheel over the edge of the tyre, (off the bike of course). In the words of a pommie chef, easy peasy. No damage to the rim and of course he had a pump strong enough to get it all back in place. Typical of a real 4WD man he insisted he do everything and all I had to do was tell him jokes and make a cup of tea.Richard and Leonie, the grey nomads
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Follow Up By: Slammin - Monday, May 26, 2003 at 23:22

Monday, May 26, 2003 at 23:22
Out of interest you can use a kangaroo jack as well. set it up as pincers.
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FollowupID: 13704

Follow Up By: Member - Rohan K - Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 17:06

Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 17:06
Richard, I've used this method myself, on a 4x4 tyre, and it worked fine. But the tyre wasn't mine. The bloke who owned the truck only had 3 good tyres so he wasn't in a position to do it himself.Life just ain't that serious.
Rohan (Sydney)
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Reply By: Dave - Monday, May 26, 2003 at 22:35

Monday, May 26, 2003 at 22:35
crossed the nullabor last year following the rail line then up the Gunbarrell last year . had 7 punctures and used the beadbreaker with no problems
dave
AnswerID: 21156

Follow Up By: Michael - Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 16:57

Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 16:57
Dave, as a matter of interest, What type of tyres were you running on that trip? regards Michael
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Follow Up By: Dave - Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 22:58

Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 22:58
was using dunlop road trek tyres.I am making another trip to cape york then through the simpson in a couple of weeks and have a new set of bridgestone duellers on now.They are a lot better on the bitumen will
soon see what they are like on the gravel
Dave
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Reply By: duncs - Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 15:09

Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 15:09
I have a R&R used it plenty of times on various wheel types and sizes, never had a problem.

Recently I used it to repair a tubless on my sisters Astra, alloy wheel, it took me about an hour to remove the tyre, repair the puncture, refit the tyre and drink a beer.

No damage to the rim but the beer was a right off.

Oh and if I am breaking the beed while thee boss cooks tea I can leave it to go and eat, or better still she can take over.

Duncs
AnswerID: 21211

Reply By: member-JB1 - Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 19:42

Tuesday, May 27, 2003 at 19:42
Stevo, A thrust race is designed to take the pressure along the axis of the shaft on which it is fitted where as a normal ball race takes the pressure at 90 degrees to the shaft on which it is fitted. A wheel bearing is a normal race but a clutch release race is a thrust race. Hope that explains it. It would be easier to draw it on paper but I havent worked out how on the keyboard.
AnswerID: 21229

Follow Up By: Alex H - Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at 10:50

Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at 10:50
Alternatively fit a brass bush where Ian's talking about the thrust race. It won't be quite as good, but brass is what my old school metalwork teacher called "self-lubricating" and it does seem to reduce the friction and make it all work easier.
Cheers.
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FollowupID: 13851

Reply By: Spy - Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at 17:04

Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at 17:04
Recently I purchased a R & R Beadbreaker. My reputation with bad luck with tyres is well known amongs my friends and I chose this model because it assists with refitting the tyre. I've used it a number of times on my spare to be sure that I am familiar with it when I use it in anger. I found the tool simple to use and if you follow the instructions you will have no problems. I would recommend one without hesitation for those heading bush. It will always be in my vehicle!
AnswerID: 21294

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