epirb rb3s

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 09, 2008 at 22:16
ThreadID: 53294 Views:1824 Replies:6 FollowUps:7
This Thread has been Archived
could some one tell me if this is the new type or the old type thats getting replaced?
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - John - Wednesday, Jan 09, 2008 at 22:31

Wednesday, Jan 09, 2008 at 22:31
Old type
John

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 280698

Reply By: Leroy - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 07:20

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 07:20
The 'new' epirbs run on 406MHZ.

Leroy
AnswerID: 280709

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 11:33

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 11:33
shane,

The new 406Mhz EPIRBS like the GME MT410 (no GPS - $429) or the GME MT 410G (with GPS - $589) are available from Whitworths Marine.

$589 may look a lot for the MT410G but the more accurate location (45 metres) due to the built-in GPS, is a big improvement on the basic MT410 which only gets the rescuers within a 5km radius.

These units are the most compact to my knowledge.

Whitworths Marine


Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 280739

Follow Up By: Member - shane (SA) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 12:40

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 12:40
thanks all.
0
FollowupID: 545059

Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 12:52

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 12:52
If a helicopter is being used to locate the missing party, then they will use their aircraft receiver to home in on the exact location using the beacons 121.5MHz transmissions.
AnswerID: 280751

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 16:28

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 16:28
Mike,

According the the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Web site, 121.5Mhz EPIRBS have an accuracy of around 20 kilometres.
MHz improves the accuracy to 5 kilometres
MHz with GPS locates the lost soul to within 45 meters.

AMSA

The referenced Web site states 120 metres (still pretty good) for the MHz when GPS enabled, but the GME MT410G is quoted by the manufacturer of 45 metres.

Not too shabby and I reckon the $140 extra for the GPS equipped unit is worthwhile.

Slightly off topic, I believe the PLB's (like the MT410's) are not actually certified for offshore use. (greater that 3 kilometres out) PLB's float, but apparently not necessarily upright and therefore don't comply with safety regs.

For us 4WD people though, the compact size gives a great advantage, for carrying in the vehicle or on one's person when trekking through the countryside.

Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 545104

Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 17:21

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 17:21
"According the the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Web site, 121.5Mhz EPIRBS have an accuracy of around 20 kilometres.
(406)MHz improves the accuracy to 5 kilometres
(406)MHz with GPS locates the lost soul to within 45 meters."

- yes, there is no ambiguity about the location accuracy in the first phase by satellite for the three different EPIRB types.

But "If a helicopter is being used to locate the missing party, then they will use their aircraft receiver to home in on the exact location using the beacons 121.5MHz transmissions" - so it doesn't matter whether you have the GPS or non-GPS EPIRB, any aircraft can still home in on your estimated satellite position using the 121.5 signal.
0
FollowupID: 545123

Follow Up By: Member - Olcoolone (S.A) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 19:05

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 19:05
5 kilometers is still a big area.

What happens if no helicopter or light plain is avaliable?

The GPS signal is sent in the transmission from the Epirb that is recieved by satallite allowing them to know where you are exactly......... 5 kilometers is a search party, 45m is a walk

We have a Epirb with GPS and think of it as cheap insurance but we also have HF, Optus sat phone and UHF.....and that other thing that covers 98% of populated Australia.

Regards Richard
0
FollowupID: 545148

Follow Up By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:11

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:11
You are all missing a very important point guys !

An activated 406 MHz beacon will be heard almost immediately BUT...

A 406 MHz beacon needs to be picked up by TWO successive overhead passes of satellites before an accurate position fix can be made. The first pass gives two possible locations up to 2,000 km APART ! It requires a second pass by a sar satellite to fix the position of an activated beacon. The next satellite pass may be 1/2 hour away or could (worst case) be up to 4 1/2 hours !

The 406 MHz beacon with gps however will give an INSTANT very accurate position.

If your beacon is registered as being land based then it may be self evident where it is located. For example, one of the two possible locations may be out in the Indian Ocean and the other position somewhere along the Gunbarrell. Also, if registered the SAR people will call the listed telephone numbers and ask where the beacon is likely to be (if anyone answers the call). If a nominated relative says that the beacon is in a 4wd in WA then it will be evident which of the two possible locations is the genuine activation site.

0
FollowupID: 545180

Reply By: Gossy - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 13:50

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 13:50
just bought the GME with GPS in it. This will locate you down to 45metres. Spending a week on the kayak on the Gordon River in Tasmania. Done this once before a few years ago and felt very confortable knowing that the EPIRB was with me! Never plan for snake bites etc.
Personally I think they should have a govt subsidy on them to make them cheaper (especially now that the digital is so accurate and eliminates false alarms - contact Next of Kin etc).
AnswerID: 280760

Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 17:24

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 17:24
I agree, it's so much cheaper for the government (and much more chance of success) to start the rescue immediately, rather than have a lengthy search, hopefully followed by a rescue.
0
FollowupID: 545125

Reply By: Member - Kingsley N (SA) - Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:58

Thursday, Jan 10, 2008 at 21:58
Shane,

Your question was answered correctly by John; however some of the references to accuracy and frequencies in later replies may need a little further explanation. The accuracy referred to relates to the possible position reported to the Australian Central Search and Rescue office (CENSAR) by the satellite as it passes within range and obviously the more accurate the better from the point of view of search parties. This is particularly important in marine situations.
The old system uses 121.5 and 243 mhz but from February 2009 the SAR satellite will only react to 406.025mhz. This new system allows for very accurate position reports thereby mostly eliminating the “search” part of the rescue. However the beacon still requires a homing frequency signal so that a human being can find it! So your new beacon must include 406.025 and 121.5 frequencies.

Usually the first action on receipt of an EPIRB signal is for CENSAR to contact Airservices Australia's Air Traffic Control Centres and request any passing aircraft to listen out on 121.5 mhz to confirm the signal. Simultaneously the responsibility for a search is established. In many cases the beacon has been accidently activated, but it still has to be found. Specialised search aircraft have an instrument which will point directly to the signal. However it is possible to search using a VHF radio by tuning just off frequency and flying (or driving) in a straight line until the signal starts to fade. A series of headings are then flown tuning the radio further off frequency until a signal is picked up. This, combined with a visual search usually locates the beacon. Often the beacon is found in a parked aircraft at an airport! The whole business is taken very seriously by the authorities.

There is a lot of information on the web about all of this and there is no doubt that the new system is much better than the old, but in the end it boils down to someone spotting the person or vehicle in distress.

Kingo
(ex Air Traffic Control)
AnswerID: 280859

Follow Up By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 07:45

Friday, Jan 11, 2008 at 07:45
The 406 MHz beacon without gps will only give an accurate position report within +/- 25 km. That's pretty good in the wide open spaces but then the 121.5 signal can be homed in on. Notification of an activation is almost instant but it could still (worst case) take up to 4 1/2 hours to get the first position as it requires two passes of satellites to get a confirmed position.

A 406 beacon with gps will give an instant gps location 'fix'.
0
FollowupID: 545242

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)