Dual Batteries Question for the Electrically Gifted!

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 08:43
ThreadID: 5371 Views:1499 Replies:3 FollowUps:2
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I take it that the more Joints/Fuses/Voltage cut out Switches you have in your set-up the more chance of Voltage Drop! Does the voltage drop effect the whole system or just the lines with the Joints/Fuses/Voltage cut out Switches are in? And would it be a good idea to use a fuse box set-up in the system, 1 for ease of connection of accessories, 2 all in the one place to keep an eye on them i.e. blown fuses?

Thanks in Advance
Keep It On The Rough Stuff

Matt (W.A.)
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 10:58

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 10:58
I run a seperate fuse box system for second battery,works a treat and is so simple to keep and eye on/trouble shoot..

AnswerID: 22186

Follow Up By: Matt (W.A.) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 11:05

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 11:05
Sounds like the way to go.

CheersKeep It On The Rough Stuff

Matt (W.A.)
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FollowupID: 14570

Reply By: Member - Bob - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 11:36

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 11:36
Matt, voltage drop occurs when connections are poor, or switch gear is inadequate for the current. The real issue is length of wire. Copper wire is really just a long resistor. The resistance, and therefore the voltage drop, can be reduced by increasing the cross sectional area of the wire, and by reducing its length. It is for these reasons that audio nuts use gold connectors and very heavy gauge wire for their speaker leads. So keep all connections clean and firmly tightened (or soldered), use heavy gauge wire, and keep it as short as possible.
AnswerID: 22189

Follow Up By: Matt (W.A.) - Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 11:39

Tuesday, Jun 10, 2003 at 11:39
Thanks for your help, I'll keep that in mind.Keep It On The Rough Stuff

Matt (W.A.)
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FollowupID: 14577

Reply By: Member - Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 20:24

Wednesday, Jun 11, 2003 at 20:24
I also try to solder all connections where possible and always check the connections for heat when the systems running hard (like the fridge connected) as heat is always an indicator of a dry joint (bad connection)

So many places to go!
So much work to do :0(
AnswerID: 22331

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