Air compressor fittings

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 13:23
ThreadID: 53783 Views:2946 Replies:8 FollowUps:5
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I have installed a Bluetongue IV under the bonnet of my vehicle and have a hose running down to a barb under the bull bar, but I would also like to run a hose to the rear of the vehicle so I can pump up the camper trailer tyres.

How would I go about setting it up so that I can switch the compressor on but only have air coming out of the outlet I am connected too? Do I need a pressure switch?

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Reply By: derraux - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:21

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:21
Rainman
Alot of air fittings only let air out once connected to them thats what i would use i have done it and it works well.
Derek
AnswerID: 283113

Reply By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:40

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:40
The female fittings are designed not to let air out of them when pressurised......have you used one in the front?

Andrew
AnswerID: 283117

Reply By: Trevor W(Brisbane) - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:45

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:45
Head over to a Trade Tools shop.The fittings you are after are Dry break Couplings and they usually sell in a Kit form.Get some compressor hose while you are at the shop and run it along beside your Chassis rails then fit a Bracket and Dry Break at the rear of your vehicle up as high as you can get to keep it out of the Mud.Even consider running up inside the vehicle so that you have to get to it when doors are open.Similar with the front,Put the dry break up inside the Bonnet to keep the crap out of it.You then have to open the bonnet to get to it and then that gives you an eye full of what is happening under the bonnet while compressor is running
AnswerID: 283119

Reply By: Member -Signman - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:47

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:47
Yea- like what Derek said. Those 'bayonet' type fittings stop the flow when the hose is detached...
Off a T junction, one at the front & one at the back would be the go.
AnswerID: 283122

Reply By: Member - Jiarna (NT) - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:52

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 14:52
Ditto to the others
I have a t-piece and a hose connector at each end. They seal themselves when the hose is unplugged. Just make sure you have a pressure switch if you don't have air flowing out somewhere while the compressor is running!!
Cheers
John
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AnswerID: 283128

Follow Up By: Rainman WA - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 15:38

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 15:38
So its like I figured, I'll need a pressure switch to stop the air until I connect the hose up to one of the fittings, is that correct?

A pressure switch will stop the compressor until the pressure is released when the hose is connected to a tyre?
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Follow Up By: Peter 2 - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 18:51

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 18:51
In a word yes, a better solution would be to fit a small air tank under the truck to give you more in reserve.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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Follow Up By: Member - Coyote (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2008 at 15:41

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2008 at 15:41
doesn't the pump have a small resevoir and pressure switch already on it??? that way.. you just ocnnect the lines to it and as long as the 'dry connect' plugs are disconnectred, the pump will only fill the whole system (tank and lines the regulated pressure, then as soon as you plug in you extra line it will kick in...
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Follow Up By: Peter 2 - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2008 at 16:55

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2008 at 16:55
some compressors like the ARB units have an integral tank, most relay on the buyr supplying one to suit.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 19:36

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 19:36
Why don't you just run one line to the rear of the vehicle and then it would be "in the middle".

A section of flexible hose could then reach both the front of your vehicle and the rear of the trailer.

Sorry Rainman, just thinking out of the square.

I actually prefer a portable compressor.
Mine sits in a plastic carry box with an on/off switch and a longish 12 volt lead.

Bill


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AnswerID: 283170

Follow Up By: Rainman WA - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2008 at 13:07

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2008 at 13:07
Thats a far simpler idea, a bit of lateral thinking there Sandman.

I used to have my compressor in a plastic carry box, but it always ended up at the bottom of everything or it wouldnt fit back into its original spot when I moved stuff around.

Its far simpler for me now that I just plug it in and pump away.
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Reply By: Hoyks - Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 19:36

Tuesday, Jan 22, 2008 at 19:36
The pressure switch for the ARB compressors is available off the shelf for $17 from memory. It will turn off at 110psi I think.

I wired it up so that the perssure switch runs a relay that runs the compressor. Saves the lots of power going to the compressor burning out the switch.

A small pressure tank can come in handy. It gives a nice reserve volume for blowing out dust and seating beads.
AnswerID: 283171

Reply By: MEMBER - Darian (SA) - Thursday, Jan 24, 2008 at 09:47

Thursday, Jan 24, 2008 at 09:47
If you have any issues tracking down the fittings, there is a mob called Beissbarth in all states [ http://www.beissbarth.com.au ] .........they supply the tyre fitting trade with all their gear) ) ...... not only do they have the bits n pieces for air fittings - the bloke at the counter knows all about the gear he sells ! That's where I got my T's and snap on bits etc. - Super Cheap do carry some stuff - it may be dearer there though.
AnswerID: 283473

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