Portable air compressor

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 13:53
ThreadID: 54041 Views:7901 Replies:9 FollowUps:11
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Does anyone know of a good reliable 12v portable compressor that doesn't weigh the earth and would be suitable for touring.
I have a generic model unkown manufacture that keeps blowing my fuses and is somewhat cumbersome to lug around.I don't want to have a fixed vehile type as may change vehicle in the near future, and am sick of giving someelse my accessories.

ta

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Reply By: Member - Bushpig - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 13:58

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 13:58
I have a Bushranger Maxair and it really is small but with high volume.

Goodluck

Cheers
Jack
AnswerID: 284510

Reply By: Andrea11 - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 14:01

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 14:01
Hi there Andrew

We have an ARB portable aircompressor, it is very impressive well worth the $300.00 + we paid for it.

Andrea
AnswerID: 284513

Reply By: Moose - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 14:07

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 14:07
Andrew
Go to Don Kyatt and get one of the dual cylinder models. Excellent value and pumps faster than my mates under bonnet name brand model. Well under $200 if I recall correctly.
Used it extensively recently in our high country trip and never let me down.
Cheers from the Moose
AnswerID: 284518

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 21:48

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 21:48
I'll second the Terrain Tamer Twin Cylinder. Mine cost $125 at the 4wd show last year - bought it to use in the shed and on the Xtrail, but tested it against my Blue Tongue 3 on my LandCruiser tyres and it was just as quick. Hope it goes as long as the Blue Tongue.

And when it comes to reseating tubeless tyres, how fast a compresser pumps doesn't have much to do with it. We reseat tubeless with any of the modern compressors. The ones that won't go are usually the 265tyres on the wider 8 inch rims, or the 235's on the 7 inch rims. In contrast, a 265 on a 7 inch rim or a 235 on a 6inch rim will always go up with a reasonable pump. And the difficult ones need a good whoosh from an air reservoir - thats why we have a few other tyres on the car - I doctored up a device from an ARB Deflater that allows you to inflate a tyre to max pressure, then take the valve out to give a big whoosh to seat the bead on the flat tyre.
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Follow Up By: whyallacookie - Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 16:34

Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 16:34
Or unless you have badly damaged rims lube the rim/tyre "joint" and use almost any compressor. Hell I have done it on a Jackaroo's tyre with an cheapish ($60) compressor. If your having that much trouble seating the bead then try running a rope (ideally a ratchet style tie down) aropund the middle of the tread with a couple of truckies hitch to force the tyre walls outwards and help the process.

Take your spare off, let it down and break the beads (remove then refit to rim if you really have to) then try it, you'll be surprised how easy it is as long as the rims aren't badly damaged and you "lube" the tyre (water will do at a pinch)

Resetting beads has become a bit of an "urban myth" used to promote "upgrading" to larger compressors and and the latest NASA approved bloody bead breaker. (Don't get me wrong a good bead breaker makes it a lot easier but it isn't impossible to do on the side of the road with basic tools.
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FollowupID: 549497

Follow Up By: Moose - Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 17:47

Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 17:47
Too bloody right whyallacookie. Have used the rope trick myself - just twisted with a big srewdriver to force the bead against the rim the little crappy compressor I had in those days managed to do the rest. Didn't know how to do the truckies hitch back in those days!
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 18:09

Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 18:09
Whyallacookie,
I don't think theres any "urban myth" there. I teach people on trips and club training days to fix tyres, often after rolling tyres off rims, or punctures, or simply as a training exercise. A lot of people have trouble, but with a few tricks and a bit of practice, they do better.

Yep you can use any compressor, and if everything's in your favour, it works. Before getting my first electric pump, I repaired tubeless and reinflated them with a hand pump (I was a bit fitter back then!) But that was in the 1970's.

In my experience, the rope around the tread trick doesn't do a lot on the modern radials - the tread buckles in before beads get pushed out. Used to work a treat in years gone by with the old crossplies though.

And to simply break the beads and reinflate is the easiest possible scenario - the bead naturally goes back against the rim. Try reinflating a spare casing thats been stored on a roofrack (squashed down), or one that with a distorted bead from heavy-handed levering.
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FollowupID: 549516

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 14:17

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 14:17
Before deciding which brand you will buy, ask what function you require of a "good" compressor. Not all of them are capable of reseating the tyre bead on the rim.

Some (like my Big Red) come in a "toolbox" and are therefore truly portable.

When you say you keep blowing fuses, are you running your generic model from the ciggy socket?
Most quality brand compressors require you to clip them directly to the battery terminals.

Bill


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AnswerID: 284521

Reply By: Wizard1 - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 15:43

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 15:43
I came across a cheap alternative to a 12V compressor the other day in Bunnings. It was a spare compressed air cylinder that had a tyre inflation guage and fitting.

You simply attach to a compressor fill with air and off you go. Could be good for those that wouldn't use an expensive 12V compressor that much.

Not sure how much volume it held.

Mind you my Blue Togue III has got me out of the poo a couple of times and worth it's weight in gold.
AnswerID: 284529

Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 19:04

Thursday, Jan 31, 2008 at 19:04
Are you sure it wasn't an Ozito CO2 cylinder?
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FollowupID: 549536

Reply By: Member -Dodger - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 16:10

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 16:10
I use a Bushranger and it has done the job for 8 years and still is going strong sure it is a little slow taking around 3 to 4 minutes to bring each Tyree up from 15lbs to 40lbs when re-inflating after sand driving and around 7 or eight minutes from flat. It will not seal a bead but then there is aerostart sic. It is also good for air beds and kids toys etc plus we have a push bike adapter etc.
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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Follow Up By: Member - Dick (Int) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:16

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:16
Which compressor will seal a bead? Obviously the higher capacity models would be the best but what have other user found to work well.

Cheers
Dick







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Follow Up By: Member - Matt (Perth-WA) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:39

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:39
Most compressors can be used to reseat a bead...you just attach a ratchet strap around the circumference in the middle of the tread and put some reasonable pressure on the strap.


This bows the beads out and with a little careful handling you can just get the bead to grip and start to seat. You then remove the strap and continue inflating.

All the best.
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Follow Up By: Wayne (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:39

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:39
Dick,

There are a few that will re seat a tubeless tyre on to the rim.

I have used the Big Red air compressure because it will and I have used it to reset a tubeless tyre.

Wayne
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FollowupID: 549331

Reply By: Brad40 - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:27

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:27
I bought mine from supercheap for $140 about three years ago it came in its own bag, rated at 72 litres per/m . it takes around 3 minutes from 15 psi to 36 psi . have used it around 50 times i reckon. thats $2.80 a time, cheap & necessary .
AnswerID: 284560

Reply By: Member - Ed. C. (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:57

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 18:57
these can be had for less than $130...

Pretty good value at that price, I reckon;-))




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....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

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AnswerID: 284561

Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 20:17

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 20:17
Ed I've had a Typhoon for 12mths now and an excellent compressor. Very fast and excellent compression rating. Only drawback I've found is the hose connection to the tyre valve a bit cheep and nasty (on mine any way) so I swapped it with my older compressor's hose.
Dunc
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Reply By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 19:18

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 19:18
Hi Andrew

I have a demo unit that you can have free of charge. It is fitted with a Anderson plug and was used on my last Birdsville trip to re-inflate after Big Red.

Contact me by email.



Regards

Derek.
AnswerID: 284563

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 21:00

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 21:00
What's on your tyre valve Derek?

Andrew
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FollowupID: 549362

Follow Up By: Derek from Affordable Batteries & Radiators - Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 21:14

Wednesday, Jan 30, 2008 at 21:14
It is the deflator. Our own PSV or 'Pressure Safety Valve'

PSV

Regards

Derek
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FollowupID: 549365

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