How much markup in Diesel

Submitted: Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:43
ThreadID: 54186 Views:2767 Replies:10 FollowUps:35
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I have heard all the excuses of why diesel is so expensive these dayswhen it was once cheaper than Petrol but explain this.

On a regular basis a privateley owned Shell and 2 Caltex near me will range from say $1.48 and $ 1.51 per litre like this morning and yet if I drive another 8km Like this morning I pay only $1.37 Per litre. That is a sving of up to $14C PER LITRE.!!! Where I bought this morning is a very small 3 pump outlet and hires the local town videos and is owned by an elderley couple who obviously are comfortable in life and are not dictated to by the big oil companies.

I asked one day where the diesel comes from and he just buys it from the big companies so why does'nt everyone have cheaper diesel.?
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Reply By: Gramps (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:54

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 13:54
AnswerID: 285336

Follow Up By: fisho64 - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 02:07

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 02:07
I dont think that is a constructive responce Gramps! Then again neither is mine!
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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 06:45

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 06:45
fisho64,

I think it's the most constructive response in the whole thread.

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Reply By: j21 - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 14:00

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 14:00
That's a question worth exploring when you consider the shear volume of diesel fuel sold to the heavy trucking industry, farmers, motorists and general industries who use diesel to drive or power many forms of machinery - therefore by the shear volume of diesel fuel sold - it should be much cheaper - added to this of course is the old arguement that diesel is cheaper to produce as it needs little refining. So why is diesel so expensive.

Imagine the cost of everyday items/goods if diesel were sold at a lower price - It is in the UK and NZ.

Food for thought.

Cheers
John
AnswerID: 285337

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 14:38

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 14:38
I believe it is now almost as expensive to refine diesel to the current "standards" of 50 ppm of sulphur (or whatever it is). Up until a few years ago, it was about 50,000ppm and was more or less just out of the ground and into your tank..... Now it goes through more processes so i guess that is one reason why it is dearer.

Still not happy Jan, but as the old saying goes: you pays ya money and ya takes ya chances.......

Nobody has ever held a gun to my head and said "YOU MUST PAY THE SERVO AND BUY DIESEL" ...... If I decide I can no longer afford the cost of diesel, I guess I'll be staying at home or going camping on my treadley!!! It's a free world and the choice about whether you buy or don't buy can only be made by one person.....YOU......

Cheers

Roachie
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Follow Up By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 16:23

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 16:23
Hey Roachie, methinks you dead right re refining costs. I'm not sure if we ,Aust, are quite up to world class diesel refining specs
yet. It wasnt long ago some European diesel motor makers would
not offer equal warranty in Aust for that very reason. As for prices
..the sure way to drop consumption by 20% is to drop kph by 10%. Would that work in a Chevynissan? Does in a Jackaroo
:)))...cheers...oldbaz.
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Follow Up By: wigger - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 17:53

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 17:53
You two are right and it's a great change to hear someone advocating finding your own solution to the price problem rather than just getting into the usual 'victim/blame the Government'stuff.
BP coy. outlets are now selling 10ppm, because drivers demand this for their new CRD engines. Does this cost more to produce?
Do any of these price whingers even acknowledge this.

On the front page of the "Sun Herald' is a big spiel about mortgage stress and 300,00 owners losing their houses as a result of possible interest rate rises. What I'd like to see is the record of what some of these people spent their money on in the last six months, and what level of credit card debt they've run up.

The driving style of people round here doesn't suggest that there's much of a brain link between their cranium and right foot.
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Follow Up By: Ross H (QLD) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 09:50

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 09:50
Part of what Roachie is saying is true it costs money to make at 50ppm or less. Bp spent in excess of 600million up grading their refinery to produce diesel at 50ppm or less however they also recouped that money in around 6 months. The process is much more efficient now with next to nil waste. People are forgetting when they make diesel or any other fuel there are a lot of other saleable by products why don't the price of these fluctuate. We have been told on more than one occasion that they will not increase our quoter because they make more money out of diesel.

As for the coles and wollies saga if they can offer up to 6 cents a litre for shopper dockets where that price is well and truely covered in the price of the food anyhow why is bp still dearer???.

Caltex here in brisbane also produces 50ppm or less as well.

What people are forgetting is that when refineries do these up grades they always come out on top IE. more efficient, more automated,less staff and the big one can charge more.

P.s Don't stop buying diesel my shares copped a flogging the
the other week

regards ross
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Follow Up By: Pezza (Bris) - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 15:41

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 15:41
Hey Ross, I didn't stop buying it, Caltex just couldn't supply it !!! You must've been using too much again, and don't try and deny it, I've seen you drive, leadfoot !!!

Cheers mate
Pezza
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Follow Up By: Ross H (QLD) - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 18:51

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 18:51
Hahaha good one mate as I recall trev and I were happy to save fuel and go around a big bog hole or two it was you who was happy to waste a 1/4 of a tank and give it a go.LOL
Well maybe next time...:)

regards ross
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Reply By: DIO - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 14:49

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 14:49
I think that without any Govt intervention e.g. price control, you have to understand that market 'forces' are at play. A retailer will generally set his price at that which the market will bare - taking into consideration any direct opposiition.
Retailers/resellers are in the business of making money. To do that requires that the selling price of the item being marketed is greater that the wholesale price. The greater the difference between the two - the greater the profit (cash in pocket). It is obvious from the presence of diesel powered vehicles on the road (world-wide) there's been a marked increase in their ownership/numbers. Hence, those in the oil industry (wholesalers and retailers) can see that demand for their product has grown therefore higher prices are more achievable/sustainable. Doesn't maatter how much you or anyone else reminices about 'the good old days' with diesel being cheaper than petrol the fact is that while there is growth in demand there will be sustainability in higher prices.
How to beat them at their game - shop around, buy only on the lower side of the discount cycle, use shopper dockets, reduce your driving/mileage, remove some of the excess/surplus weight from your vehicle - tool boxes, accessories (unecessary for urban travel), lightn-off on the gas pedal, reduce your speed a little, drive more smoothly - avoid unecessary braking/stopping/starting or if all that fails to meet with your expectations then consider leaving the truck in the shed.
Now there is one way where lower prices to the consumer are achievable without wholesalers or retailers having to suffer any losses. What's that you say, well just consider the percentage motorists pay in tax (GST) and excise per litre. Every time there is an increase in the retail/pump price, the Govt. both State and Federal receive a nice little windfall. With all of the increases in the world oil prices, nowhere have we heard of any (ANY) Govt. Minister suggesting let alone advocating a reduction in either of these taxes imposed on motorists. Yes I know that some in the community (Mining, agricultural etc) may receive rebates BUT never have I know (or recall) a Govt. offering 'Joe Average' a reduction. What a windfall for Govts. If you really want to do something meaningful, whinge to your local Member(s), annoy the heck out of them, demand changes, tell them you've had enough.
That's the only way I can see there ever being any long term meaningful improvement for motorists.
AnswerID: 285349

Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 14:55

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 14:55
"whinge to your local Member(s), annoy the heck out of them, demand changes, tell them you've had enough"



Sorry, we've installed a Petrol Price Commissioner, all will be OK.

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Follow Up By: Hairs - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 18:55

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 18:55
Dio,
I agree with all that you have said.
But I have been lead to believe, that with the Rebate I think it is 38%, that is given to Primary Producers, Mining Industry, Transport Industries to claim,that is burdened by the retail user of Diesel.
If this is true why isn't the pain spread across all uses of oil products?, Eg: Unleaded uses.
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Follow Up By: Gerhardp1 - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 21:16

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 21:16
Mostly true, except the bit about both Fed and State govts getting more when the price rises.

The Feds get a fixed excise, the extra GST all goes to the states.

The feds will only get more from price rises if the oil companies decide to declare a higher taxable profit in Aus.

This is probably unlikely, since they would all be declaring the barest minimum they can get away with in AU, due to our high company tax rates.

There is also at least one Japanese car importer that does the same - "transfer pricing" leaving bugger all profit in AU. Can't mention its name, but it starts with the letter after S
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Reply By: Outnabout David (SA) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 17:36

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 17:36
I don't wish to go on about why diesel is so expensive.
It was more as the topic suggested about the markup and the fact that I could by it 14c/ litre or $20 per tank. That is a huge saving over the year plus I don't have to support those big coles/woolworths chains which I think somehow managed to increase the costs of fuel when they brought in the so-called discount vouchers.
AnswerID: 285387

Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 17:46

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 17:46
David,

Agree 100%. The topic has been done to death and undoubtedly will pop up again this week via the media.

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Follow Up By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 18:22

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 18:22
David it was put to me once a few yerars ago that a rule of thumb was that whatever the barrel price was, say $75 for example, was approx. the retail price in cents, 75c, plus taxes and charges.
As for the refining, even IF it costs as much as petrol to refine how come in most places its 10 - 15 cents dearer than petrol?
And as for supporting the supermarkets, never do, if I can help it, they already sell nearly 60% of our fuel, and huge amounts of grog sales, and I dont have to tell you how much of our essential food items, so we are creating a rod for our own back, in 20 years or less we will regret the day we ever set foot inside a coles/woolworths etc store.
ALWAYS support your little man wherever you can. Its in your own interest.

Cheers Pesty
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Follow Up By: wigger - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 19:07

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 19:07
You're right Mr Pesty,
Buying into the Coles/woolworths coupon racket might be the stupidest and most shortsighted thing that we have done. This process has eliminated lots of small retailers and created an oligopoly that will eventually have even fewer big players.
Fortunately companies like BP have reacted to this and more than match the discount.
The problem is that buying from some of the 'No Name' small fuel suppliers may not be possible if you need 10ppm diesel, and for the money you save, there is a much lesser degree of product guarantee. Not so long ago there were 'people of midddle eastern appearance' in Sydney adulterating fuel with paint thinners. (Will supply names if required ) At least with the biggies, they've got a lot of reputation to lose.
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Reply By: Brian (Montrose, Vic.) - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 19:44

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 19:44
Of more concern to me is, When are they going to put more that 1 or 2 diesel bowsers at any given servo.
I get thoroughly fed up with having to wait for Mrs shopping trolley to fill her go-cart with ULP, then wash the windscreen, then find her purse, then loose her keys etc etc etc when as she is doing this there are 2 or more empty bowsers that she could have used, instead of the one closest to the road, that incidentally is the only one with diesel and I have to wait and put up with her dirty looks because I have the nerve to want to use the only pump that serves the fuel I require....
Brian T
AnswerID: 285413

Reply By: Hairs - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 20:08

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 20:08
The numbers just keep getting bigger,
And this is for half a year.


Woolworths posts half-yearly profit
Wednesday January 30, 2008, 12:51 pm

Supermarket giant Woolworths says it continues to experience strong sales growth across all its divisions.

The company has reported a half-yearly turnover of $24 billion - an increase of 8.6 per cent on the previous corresponding period.

Woolworths chief executive Michael Luscombe says December sales were solid, with the bulk of the Christmas trading occurring later than the previous year.

Petrol sales have risen to $2.7 billion but the increase is due to higher prices, which have also resulted in lower volumes being sold in the second quarter.

Woolworths shares dropped 2.7 per cent on the release of the results, because the market was hoping for more.
Qoted YaHoo Finance
AnswerID: 285417

Follow Up By: Gerhardp1 - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 21:20

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 21:20
Selling food to more than 12,000,000 people should return some sort of profit.

If I opened a business and needed to invest many millions/billions in stores, distribution, etc, I would want to make a profit as well.
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Follow Up By: wigger - Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 22:42

Sunday, Feb 03, 2008 at 22:42
Gerhardp if it's ok for W worths to make a profit then what's the problem with oil companies doing the same. There seem to be a lot of people like Gramps who resent fuel coys making profits which have yet to be proven as being excessive. None of the various enquiries or ACCC have definitively proven that this is the case. A lot of the backlash is in the same category as bankbashing. Caltex's anual report claimed that the refiner was making a gross profit of 2c per litre. Is this accurate. We may never really get to the truth but mouthing off in the absence of hard facts, is pretty tiresome to listen to. Unfortunately the indefensible weekly price fluctuations just egg them on.
Do all these people complain about 50 to 100% markups in shops?
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Follow Up By: Gerhardp1 - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 00:03

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 00:03
Yes, oil companies should make a profit, banks, etc all should. Wage-earners deserve to get paid for their work, and they deserve less than an entrepreneur who employs them. That's how our system works, the other system of socialism never works.

But there is plenty of evidence of price gouging, collusion and price fixing by monopolists which undermines our system, and leads to those of us who know this to occasionally need a moan about it to repair our enthusiasm to go on :)

Which industries are guilty - let's see, a few come readily to mind - telcos, banks, local government, state government, oil companies, cardboard packaging suppliers, your turn ......

It's mainly to do with the fact that we can't "hit back" against the "bodies" or the "system" when we know we are being fleeced again.

If you believe Caltex is only making 2c a litre, I think you are being nieve. They've been saying that since petrol was 7c a litre in 1966.
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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 01:32

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 01:32
I agree that there are plenty of powerful monopolists, oligopolists 'etc out there ripping us off. What I do find baffling is that people zero in on banks and fuel companies to have a bash, when this is an area where customer does have a much larger degree over the price they pay for the product, than for example flour derived products where Goodman Fielder totally control the market. If you don't like the bank, go to a credit union. If you don't like the price of fuel, buy it early in the week. Get a fuel credit card. Use less.
It is a fact that the demand for fuel by non commercial customers is extremely "elastic' (not like bread).
Like I said, some of this fuel price harping is very uninformed and some brains should be put into gear before mouth opens. The only good thing is that we haven't had a whole bunch of dh's saying " it's all the fault of the new Labor government".

I said" I really don't know if 2c is what they are making' I don't believe all that I read on the biz page of the SMH but it does surprise me that, if this such readily discernible bullchit. no one comes out to challenge it. (like Ross Gittins or... having a seniors moment, but I''ll give you the name of the other stirrer economist.

Anyway I've got to go now, this is the time of night when I'm usually out doing driveoffs from gas stations
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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 02:14

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 02:14
Right, back with a full tank.
Now listen up Gramps This is a subject (the price of diesel) that has been done to death but still some people dont get it, so you need to grasp the following facts:
Fuel is very 'elastic' i.e if price goes up significantly, there is a large group who will respond by trying to buy less.( Compare this with bread.) If demand drops, then price will fall. This is what happpens when pump price goes up on Thursday and Friday. Fuel coys can see there is less being sold so they start lowering the price. Guess when most petrol is bought... Tuesday. So? we have quite a lot of control over the price of petrol.
The problem with diesel is that all the big users are buying it on a contract basis(cheaper than us) The balance is not large enough and by the time you also take out commercial users who aren't price fussy, there's fa people who will be elastic in buying. Hence no price movement. No good writing to your MP. THIS IS THE REAL WORLD of SUPPLY AND DEMAND AND PRICE. AMEN
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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 06:42

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 06:42
Wigger,

You absolute tosser.

"There seem to be a lot of people like Gramps who resent fuel coys making profits" Where have I said that ?????

I suggest you go back and re-read this post in total. For whatever reason you seem fixated on me ( sigh, I know, I'm just so lovable ).

The last thing I need from ANY of you is a lecture on this topic as I probably know more about it than the lot of you put together.



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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 08:55

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 08:55
Morning everybody,
then (for gerhardp
The company recorded an increased full year profit after tax of $430 million on a replacement cost of sales operating profit (RCOP) basis for the year ended 31 December 2006 (2005: $414 million excluding significant items).

This profit equates to approximately 2.2 cents per litre on average for all petroleum products sold.

Earnings benefited from stronger refiner margins with the Caltex Refiner Margin* averaging US$10.13 a barrel in 2006, up from US$8.40 a barrel in 2005 as a result of strong demand and tight supply.

This is from the caltex website so my recollection of the figure is
fairly close.

and for my non complete tosser friend Gramps

"whinge to your local Member(s), annoy the heck out of them, demand changes, tell them you've had enough"



Sorry, we've installed a Petrol Price Commissioner, all will be OK.

I found this among the posts. does it sound familiar?
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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 09:04

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 09:04
Wigger,

You're an even bigger tosser than I first thought.

"whinge to your local Member(s), annoy the heck out of them, demand changes, tell them you've had enough" is a direct quote from DIOs post above. Is the rolling smiley beneath it totally beyond your comprehension?

"Sorry, we've installed a Petrol Price Commissioner, all will be OK."

Is my remark concerning Kevin Crudd's solution. I probably should have marked it someway so you would understand it.

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Follow Up By: Gerhardp1 - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 09:08

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 09:08
Well, that's all OK then. Caltex says it made 2 cents per litre profit in AU, so that must be the absolute truth, mustn't it?

Those less gullible would wonder how much they make overseas by using transfer pricing? You are aware that nearly all global companies (which is nearly all companies today) use transfer pricing to reduce the profit they declare in AU to reduce their exposure to our punitive company (and individual) tax rates.

Car importers, particularly some from Japan, do this to an extreme level. Have a look through ATO case histories for the name of a prominent Japanese importer which has been investigated for doing this. Can't say which one it is, but their cars are loved by 80% of this forum :)

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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 09:44

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 09:44
Wigger,

Hello ... Hello ... still waiting for your evidence of where I resented oil companies making a profit

Hello .... Hello ... are you there ?????

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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:16

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:16
Gramps Can you tell me what this sentence means.
'Is my remark concerning Kevin Crudd's solution'. so that I can try and even understand what you're on about?. When you start
on this 'crud' stuff it says something about where you're coming from. A bit of government bashing that hasn't got much substance behind it and your own prejudice shows.

'The last thing I need from ANY of you is a lecture on this topic as I probably know more about it than the lot of you put together.'

It's a very bold man (or stupid) who makes this claim. However you might as well tell us what your qualifications are to enable you to say this. Dont be embarrassed if it was in a previous life
as vice president of the Upper Limpopopo Oil company
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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:39

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:39
Gerhardp, (notice I don't start calling you a complete tosser)
I said:
"Caltex's anual report claimed that the refiner was making a gross profit of 2c per litre. Is this accurate. We may never really get to the truth."
"I really don't know if 2c is what they are making' I don't believe all that I read on the biz page of the SMH but it does surprise me that, if this such readily discernible bullchit. no one comes out to challenge it."
so it's a bit unfair to come back at me with:
"Well, that's all OK then. Caltex says it made 2 cents per litre profit in AU, so that must be the absolute truth, mustn't it?

I want to know as much as a whole lot of other people to what degree the oil coys are making excessive profits. The problem is that there's a whole lot of no brainer mouthing off that is low on facts and high on myth/ignorance.

Yours in convivial forum exchange,
Wicker
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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:40

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:40
Wigger,

Still refusing to answer I see. Where have I resented Oil companies making a profit? It's a very simple question regarding your initial allegation. Are you capable of backing it up or not?

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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:43

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:43
Gramps
Are you there? !!!!!!!!!!!!!

C'mon wake up

Try not to doze off.
We'll never get finished at this rate
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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:47

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 11:47
Wigger,

I suggest you check your mail before you mouth off.

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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:06

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:06
Wigger,

Hello ???????????????????????
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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:10

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:10
Oooooh, Gramps, you're an awful man talking like that
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Follow Up By: Gramps (NSW) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:14

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:14
LOL waiting, waiting, waiting :)))

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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:26

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:26
Sorry, just been on the phone to the Major Disputes Reconciliation Office. They have got a vacancy at Mirage Port Douglas conference centre for two weeks late this month.
They need to know how many you will be bringing in your party if you want to attend. I feel it only fair to warn you that I will have 20 and Joe Hockey will be mong them.
Just one rule apparently-----not allowed to call each other tossers on first day.
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Follow Up By: wigger - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:29

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 12:29
Uh Uh,
the unforgivable,
I forgot,

Warmest regards
Wigger
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Reply By: Member - Bucky (VIC) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 08:41

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 08:41
If you want it , buy it, there is no other way.
Otherwise get yourself a little sardine can, that will give you a squillion km/lt.
I too have been caught, but only a couple of hundred times with fuel prices, but what can you do, chase the stuff all over the place, and use more fuel in doing that.
Remember it was not that long ago, when Safeway/Woolies brought in the cheap themselves, and that what it was, cheap !.
Now think what it did to the "big" companies, ,, it made them price conscious.

I do agree with the ACCC, ( the toothless tiger ! ) competition brings down the prices, not laws.
Cheers
Bucky
AnswerID: 285476

Reply By: Member - Bucky (VIC) - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 08:41

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 08:41
If you want it , buy it, there is no other way.
Otherwise get yourself a little sardine can, that will give you a squillion km/lt.
I too have been caught, but only a couple of hundred times with fuel prices, but what can you do, chase the stuff all over the place, and use more fuel in doing that.
Remember it was not that long ago, when Safeway/Woolies brought in the cheap themselves, and that what it was, cheap !.
Now think what it did to the "big" companies, ,, it made them price conscious.

I do agree with the ACCC, ( the toothless tiger ! ) competition brings down the prices, not laws.
Cheers
Bucky
AnswerID: 285477

Follow Up By: Hairs - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 13:48

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 13:48
"Competition brings down the price".
This is so true, but when the competition has been swallowed up or put out of business. that makes a huge difference to the landscape.
When there is no competition you are at their mercy and the choice is gone.
I refuse to put Caltex/Woolies, Coles/Shell diesel in my 80 series. She runs like crap if i put a tank load of that rubbish in her. Blows smoke at first startup and is rattly. I don't care how much you get of with your shopper docket, its not worth it in the long run.


Too many freaks and not enough circuses :-)
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Reply By: Axel [ the real one ] - Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 10:15

Monday, Feb 04, 2008 at 10:15
One of the classic examples of lets not really have any price competition happened recently at the local woolies / coles servoes /// the coles variety had thru their liquorland a 20c a lt off fuel promotion[ buy 6 bottles of vino to qualify] ,,funny NOT that for the whole promotion period the local coles fuel outlet had all its fuel prices set at exactly 15 point 9 cents per lt higher than the local woolies servo,, competition will bring the price down ??? yeah right !![ insert extreme sarcasm]
AnswerID: 285493

Reply By: 93 Navara - Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 15:07

Tuesday, Feb 05, 2008 at 15:07
Local MP, government need to be harrassed. If not to cause further action by toothless tiger the ACCC, to take stock and evaluate amount of tax paid per litre. The extra money made by goverment due to barrell price increasing over previous years is phenomenal.
Beggars belief some of the posts above that subscribe to "no put a gun to your head, you don't have to buy it" Well most people do, because we need vehicles to commute to work, and a 4WD is the only way to explore our country. What a half arsed GST.
Considering the barrel price is tipped to double again within 3 years, I guess we sell the fourbies and take up bushwalking.
AnswerID: 285768

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