tank protection

Submitted: Thursday, Feb 14, 2008 at 21:04
ThreadID: 54579 Views:1640 Replies:3 FollowUps:5
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who if any, have something between the plastic water tank and the stone guard? seen this on another thread and got me thinking about the small stones that get caught between the tank and the guard.
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Reply By: Outnabout David (SA) - Thursday, Feb 14, 2008 at 21:17

Thursday, Feb 14, 2008 at 21:17
My tank has a sealed stoneshield so nothing gets in.

I have looked at a lot and thought that they would fill up with stones and then rub through.
The edges prone to exposure should be strong and solid and then underneath large holes so that small rocks will for ouut or at least you would see that it was full. Most of our fuel tanks on 4wD'S are like this.
AnswerID: 287524

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Feb 14, 2008 at 21:30

Thursday, Feb 14, 2008 at 21:30
My trailer has nothing but air between the guard and the tank.
About 10-15mm gap from memory.

The guard is something like 16 gauge, U shaped and fixed so that the sides are open but the front and rear are closed.

Never noticed stones to be still present when I have completed a trip.


Bill


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Follow Up By: Trevor R (QLD) - Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 08:39

Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 08:39
Sand Man,

Check out the pics I posted on This Thread There was a thousand little stones between my guard and tank when I got back from last years EO gathering. I went via the BV track. I was shocked to see so much damage and so many stones that made it through the guard. No damage to tank itself so stone guard did it's job IMO. So much so, that O just straightened the guard a little and put it back on.

I am now thinking of adding the foam after seeing this idea on this site.

Regards, Trevor.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 09:14

Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 09:14
Trevor,

I have checked out the pictures and can only say that guard is insubstantial IMO. It looks as if it was made for weight saving, rather than protection.
The gauge of the sheet metal is too light and does not extend the full height and width, thus when the stones hit it, the material collapses, leaving large gaps for stones to enter more easily.

Imagine the guard being almost as thick as the brackets shown that support it. The one on my camper trailer is self supporting. It bolts to the underside of the base both front and back and does not require separate brackets to hold it.

A water tank slung under a trailer or caravan needs the best form of protection you can give it. The contents are "precious" in the outback.

My advice for what it's worth.



Bill


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Follow Up By: Trevor R (QLD) - Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 09:48

Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 09:48
Self Supporting Tank Guard, now that's a valid suggestion.

Thanks Sand Man, I'll look into it before this years Gathering at Innaminka.

Regards, Trevor.
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Follow Up By: Member -Signman - Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 10:57

Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 10:57
That was just an idea from my Motor Sport (Rallying) days..
Just a bit of light density foam between the sump guard/sump and fuel tank guard/ tank. Just saved the 'vital' areas in case of impact- no added weight- and even small stones could chaffe, especially plastic tanks..
Could be of benefit for water tanks on vans etc. subject to stony roads...


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Reply By: mfewster - Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 08:46

Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 08:46
I sprayed expandafoam into the gap on mine for the same reasons. Filled it up nicely. Almost weightless. Quick and easy to do. Has been fine ever since. Cost about $15.00 fo a can. I also found some small gaps in the welded covers on the ends of chassis rails and tow bar. I sealed up the forwards facing ends.
AnswerID: 287572

Reply By: DIO - Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 09:28

Friday, Feb 15, 2008 at 09:28
Try a piece of rubber carpet underlay. It is about 4mm thick, has a dimpled surface and is perfect, preventing chaffing and shape allows water to drain easily. Cheap too, picked mine up from friendly carpet installer - for free.
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