Air presure for camper trailer

Submitted: Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:16
ThreadID: 5559 Views:2467 Replies:8 FollowUps:6
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I am new to camper trailers and am intersted in knowing what pressure other people run in the their trailer tyres.

My camper is around 900 - 1000kg loaded and the tyres are 265/75/16 Dunlop Grand Treks. I know these things are usually trial and error however a starting point would handy.
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Reply By: Member - Melissa - Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:21

Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:21
Hi Kevin,

Our load and tyre specs are much the same as yours except we run Coopers. Rims and tyres same on car and trailer. We run with much the same tyre pressure between car and trailer. If we lower pressure on the car, we generally do the same for the trailer and vice cersa.

:o) MelissaPetrol 4.5L GU Patrol &
Camprite TL8 offroad camper
AnswerID: 23067

Follow Up By: Kevin - Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:28

Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:28
Hello Melissa,

I run 285/75/16 Cooper STT on my Gu and usually run on the bitumen with them around 36PSI I figured that the load on the axle of the camper trailer was around 20% less, so run with 20% less in the trailer tyres which is around 29 PSI and at this satge it seems to stop the trailer jumping around and shaking everthing to bits in it.
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FollowupID: 15289

Follow Up By: Member - Melissa - Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:40

Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:40
Sounds reasonable Kevin. We used to run with a lower pressure on our old camper for the same reasons. Back then we had 9 leaf springs and no shockies and only about 800kg so there was a lot of shaking and jarring going on. The new Camprite has independant swing arm suspension with dual coil spring set-up and Rancho shocks. The manufacturer tells us this set-up is specifically designed to cope well with both light and heavy loads without causing the trailer to jump about etc. So far, this seems to be the case, although usually our trailer is about 1000kg when loaded up. With this suspension set-up and load the trailer sits on the road very nicely. This means our main tyre concern goes to wear and tear on the tyres themselves rather than effect on the load.

Trailer tyre pressure, particularly in sand, has been debated on the campertrailer list in the past. It was quite interesting as everyone seems to have their own ideas.

:o) MelissaPetrol 4.5L GU Patrol &
Camprite TL8 offroad camper
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FollowupID: 15290

Follow Up By: Kevin - Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:50

Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:50
Melissa,

How do you find the independent suspension? we had our camper custom made as we could not find anything we liked and was advised against Independent so we went 7leaf Offroad suspension with ranch shocks for a Jeep wrangler it seems nice and sutle without sag.
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FollowupID: 15292

Follow Up By: Member - Melissa - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2003 at 10:31

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2003 at 10:31
Hi Kevin,

Having had both leaf suspension and now independent, I would have to say the independent suspension is the better of the two. This is mainly because it seems to afford a more supple ride under both light and heavy loads.

Having said that, if the trailer had leaf springs rather than independent, we still would have bought it and been happy. IMO, in 99% of cases, well matched leaf springs to the trailer/load perform very well. Some people make a an issue of reduced clearance but also in 99% of cases the diff housings on the 4WD would stop us before the trailer axle.

Interestingly, a trailer manufacturer recently told me that they use independent suspension purely and simply because the market wants to see flashy suspension with bright coils and shockies. He himself was far from convinced there was any real gain over leaf spring set-up.

BTW, I'm interested to know what your trailer is.

:o) MelissaPetrol 4.5L GU Patrol &
Camprite TL8 offroad camper
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FollowupID: 15532

Follow Up By: Kevin - Wednesday, Jun 25, 2003 at 09:46

Wednesday, Jun 25, 2003 at 09:46
Hello Melissa,

We had the Trailer custom made by a coach builder, who now only does custom trailers and after market fabrications. We meet him through a friend of a friend and said he could build exactley what we were looking for whithout the ridiculous price tag. The trailer has our 73litre Auto fidge mounted on rollers that come out of the side of the trialer and is feed by 2 x 135amp heavy duty batteries. The suspension is 7 leaf off road suspension with jeep wrangler shock absorbers. The brakes are off road electrics.

It is currently being fitted out with a fairly well appointed kitchen, with a low pressure cooktop and grill, sink and storgae for untensiles and pot and pans.

We will be taking it on its first big trip in January to the High Country, which is why we are now putting on the final touches.

The tent was done by Freedom Canavas!!

My email is kevjulie@bigpond.net.au , if you give me your email I will send a picture of it when the kitchen fitout is complete.

Cheers
Kevin
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FollowupID: 15623

Follow Up By: Kevin - Wednesday, Jun 25, 2003 at 09:46

Wednesday, Jun 25, 2003 at 09:46
Hello Melissa,

We had the Trailer custom made by a coach builder, who now only does custom trailers and after market fabrications. We meet him through a friend of a friend and said he could build exactley what we were looking for whithout the ridiculous price tag. The trailer has our 73litre Auto fidge mounted on rollers that come out of the side of the trialer and is feed by 2 x 135amp heavy duty batteries. The suspension is 7 leaf off road suspension with jeep wrangler shock absorbers. The brakes are off road electrics.

It is currently being fitted out with a fairly well appointed kitchen, with a low pressure cooktop and grill, sink and storgae for untensiles and pot and pans.

We will be taking it on its first big trip in January to the High Country, which is why we are now putting on the final touches.

The tent was done by Freedom Canavas!!

My email is kevjulie@bigpond.net.au , if you give me your email I will send a picture of it when the kitchen fitout is complete.

Cheers
Kevin
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FollowupID: 15624

Reply By: Member -BJ (Sydney) - Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:48

Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 15:48
As Mellisa said Patrol & Kimberley about the same, 38 on black top, 25 off road, what ever to get thru sand .Regards Bob
27th June Gulf trip
AnswerID: 23068

Reply By: Member - Rohan K - Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 16:52

Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 16:52
The Pathie and trailer exert about the same load per tyre (550 Kgs) so we run 38 on-road for all six, 28 on rough dirt and whatever is necesary elswhere. I keep it simple by running the same pressures in the trailer tyres as I do the Pathie tyres, wherever I am.Talk is cheap ...
Rohan (Sydney)
AnswerID: 23072

Reply By: diamond (bendigo) - Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 20:47

Friday, Jun 20, 2003 at 20:47
i usually run the same in trailer as in the car.
31x10.5x15 cooper on our patrol 36psi when towing
30x9.5x15 cooper on camper 36psi.
when we go sand let all 6 tyres down to 18psi.looking foward to september(landcruiser park/fraser island)
AnswerID: 23097

Reply By: duncs - Saturday, Jun 21, 2003 at 16:27

Saturday, Jun 21, 2003 at 16:27
I run a TrakShak idependant suspension with about 1000 to 1100kg behind a 4.2T Patrol. I run 40psi in the car on road and drop to about 32 if on dirt. I like to keep it about 20 in the sand. On the trailer I run about 26psi almost everywhere but if it is hard and stony will drop the trailer below that maybe 20psi.

I have only had the trailer in short patches of sand and not had to worry about dropping pressures yet.

The TrakShak is the best trailer I have ever pulled. It follows like a well trained puppy. My gear always arrives undamaged. I have pullled a solid axle TrakShack and would probably prefer that on the road but off the independant is the way to go.

Happy towing
Duncs
AnswerID: 23155

Reply By: ThePublican - Saturday, Jun 21, 2003 at 20:19

Saturday, Jun 21, 2003 at 20:19
Kevin, we run the camper tires the same as the towing vehicle,variation,the old 4psi rule,[see archives].
AnswerID: 23164

Reply By: David N. - Sunday, Jun 22, 2003 at 11:58

Sunday, Jun 22, 2003 at 11:58
For a lighter load on the trailer than your car you should run proportionally lower pressure on your trailer's tyres- you give it a much better ride by doing so.
At higher pressure the tyres might last forever but it'll shake you trailer and gear around a lot more.
IMHO for your setup I'd start with about 28- 30psi on road- obviously less in soft stuff. I'd rather wear the tyres a tad quicker and look after your trailers suspension and contents.
Cheers and happy travels.
AnswerID: 23195

Reply By: Kevin - Monday, Jun 23, 2003 at 14:50

Monday, Jun 23, 2003 at 14:50
Thankyou everyone for your responses, I guess it will be a bit of "trial and error" however at least I have a starting point!
AnswerID: 23283

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