Carbon credits and you

Submitted: Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 19:11
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Just a few hours ago I heard an item on News Radio (when parliament is not sitting) . The subject carbon credits...seems we will be entitled to emit so much but beyond yr limit you will have to pay extra whether you are home or at a powered site ,filling you rig etc....so a double wammy within aprox 2 years. Then there is the price of oil......oh dear I have a headache...silverback
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Reply By: Willem - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 19:36

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 19:36
Its mostly supposition.

Some smart person will come up with an alternative....like a 3 cylinder 2 stroke Nissan running on H20.....hahahahaha
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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 19:38

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 19:38
Carbon Credits.... What a load of crap!! Its just a new way to make money and believe me, there are many companies and governments that are going to make a tidy sum from no good reason.. Michael
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Follow Up By: Member - Vince B (NSW) - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 19:55

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 19:55
How very true Michael.
Just another damn tax!!!.
Vince
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Reply By: Andrew from Vivid Adventures - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 20:01

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 20:01
You'll want something to sell to compensate for the extra you'll be paying for fuel, power... well everything, perhaps even sausages.
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Reply By: Shaker - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 20:15

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 20:15
The whole thing is becoming ridiculous, like the proposed banning of plastic shopping bags, now a lot people are buying so called "green bags", but also they now buy plastic kitchen tidy bags, whereas in the past, the plastic shopping bag became the kitchen tidy bag.
So what we got free, we now pay for 2 ways.

So who benefits from this? ...... You guessed it, the supermarkets!
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 20:24

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 20:24
OOHH Yeah!! Those green bags and those plain calico bags are cotton.. Cotton has its own environmental problems.. It must be the worst crop for water wasting and noxious chemicals... Also some of those so called enviro green bags are , yes fine woven polypropylene, similar to the polyethlene bags only much heavier, yes they may last longer but how much longer... what a take!! Michael
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Follow Up By: Member - Paul C (NSW) - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 20:41

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 20:41
Plastic Bags are fully recyclable. Why ban them?
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 21:43

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 21:43
Paul because people don't
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 21:56

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 21:56
Richard, People recycle them for lots of uses and for garbage liners also but the quality isn't really good enough to keep recycling them. Most end up with holes in them within a short time so they are useless. Once they are useless, there is no provision to ultimately recycle them, meaning shredding them and turning them into something else. Your recycle bin doesn't want them.. Its not the consumers fault that there is no provision for this.. One the whole, I think most people are very good recyclers in many areas.

P.S. I think one of the big department store recycles them but doesn't help everyone.
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Follow Up By: Member - Paul C (NSW) - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 22:28

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 22:28
"meaning shredding them and turning them into something else."
Sounds like recycling to me. My local coles still accepts them

On reflection I probably posted a comment in here which was ,at best, ambiguous but will almost definitely hijack this post.
Having just finished working in the waste Industry for 4 years, I can tell you that plastic bags definitely ARE recyclable, not as bin liners but as pure, clean (or almost clean)plastiic. I can put my hand up and say that I use them for bin liners, Know it's not right but sure is convenient. I regurlarly use the green bags at coles and would encourage everyone to recycle there plastic bags.

I will throw this rough stat out there and I will have nothing more to say about plastic bags.

Of 12% of Sydneys pastic bags thrown into household bins, 80% end up being recycled.

Paul

PS
Don't bother with the line... All of Sydney gives you the bleep s!
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Follow Up By: Member - Paul C (NSW) - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 22:30

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 22:30
sorry, shoul;d have been "their" plastic bags. Mrs Prentice would be happy!
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 23:57

Friday, Mar 28, 2008 at 23:57
Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) ....... How many times is a dedicated kitchen bin liner bag used?
At least a plastic shopping bag used as a bin liner is being used for the second time!
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 02:19

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 02:19
sorry the Collins GEM Australian English Dictionary says

Recycle vt. reprocess a manufactured substance for use again:

not reuse.

We all reuse the bag as bags. but we still through the bag in the bin...

Regards

Richard
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 15:33

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 15:33
Where do we throw bin liner bags then??
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 15:38

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 15:38
I would say that when thay are full you throw them in the bin.
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Reply By: mfewster - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 08:01

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 08:01
Yep, the answers (if they exist) are going to be expensive. But the problems are worse. Have a bit of a walk around any se asian waterway (maybe not Singapore) where you get to see close up the problems with plastic bags. We tend to hide the problems away, but it catches up on us eventually. I just love the attitude of those of this generation that just want to leave the problems we create to the next generation to wear.
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Follow Up By: Member - David P (VIC) - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 09:42

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 09:42
Begs the question..you break it you ... ..??? silverback
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Reply By: T-Ribby - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 11:23

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 11:23
Wonder if that includes heavy breathers (co2)
It will be bicycles and Morris dancing next for you lot out there !.
Does anyone have a figure on the current (Aus) Kyoto debt?. As at 31/1/08 NZ's liability was $NZ963,000,000 population 4 mill.

(I'm off to have that fat juicy steak while I can still afford it)
cheers
T.R.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 15:37

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 15:37
I heard on the news last night, that Australian meat is sold in parts of the US at around 30% of the prices charged to the consumer here in Oz.
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Follow Up By: mfewster - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 17:45

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 17:45
And the longer we ignore it, the bigger the bill that will have to be paid.
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Reply By: mfewster - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 19:30

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 19:30
A news item for those who don't believe in global warming or those who think it will cost too much to take action.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/mar/30/india.flooding

And this is just the beginning. (I was tempted to say "the tip of the iceberg.) James Lovelock's predictions and the timelines to get there remain exactly spot on. None of our (or the world's) politicians want to talk about Lovelock, but he remains the most accurate forecaster of the global warming timeline.
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Follow Up By: Member - David P (VIC) - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 21:38

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 21:38
of course the "right" would say that is typical of the Guardian....not convenient....silverback
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