Explore Australia the hard way

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 20:30
ThreadID: 56054 Views:2295 Replies:8 FollowUps:12
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Cape York and Simpson desert are some of what we have already explored of Australia. We were just wondering what would be the most difficult 4wd track in Australia to explore by 4x4? (Not 4wd parks)
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Reply By: Member - David P (VIC) - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 21:06

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 21:06
Base yourself at Dargo (for the steak sandwiches at the pub) then E.W. or N from there ... if you don't mind the vertical challenge ..don't forget the track closure season will be upon us soon.....silverback
AnswerID: 295474

Reply By: Willem - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 21:10

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 21:10
Where there are no tracks.

Simpson, Gibson, Victoria, Little Sandy and Great Sandy Deserts.

Driving blind across Spinifex(Hummock Grass) and broken Mulga country keeps the adrenalin running.

The High Country in Victoria may have some scary tracks too. Have only done the easy ones so far :-)
AnswerID: 295477

Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Sydney. - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 21:50

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 21:50
Yeah Willem , I agree - Eagle Camp to Calvert Ranges would be a challenge for most .
Willie
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Follow Up By: Member - Footloose - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 12:20

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 12:20
Willie, I read that you're not "allowed" to do that country any more.
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Follow Up By: Member - Willie , Sydney. - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 13:55

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 13:55
This is true Footie ,

The Martu land claim settlement has given the land to people who never go out there .

Do you know that in the three times I have travelled the bottom half of the CSR and the Eagle Hwy and Gunbarrel Hwy , I have never seen an aboriginal person outside of the communities at Cotton Creek and Wiluna .

Maybe they don't go out there anymore , because there is no shops to buy tinned food .

The government should act on this and spend a few million on a village , a school and shop out there . It could be used for twelve months and then abandoned (like three others I have seen in WA).

Willie .
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Follow Up By: Member - Footloose - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 15:47

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 15:47
Yes, agree. But it's their country I guess. We've wasted a lot of taxpayers $$ giving handouts instead of hand ups.

How many opportunities have been wasted, for indigenous small bush businesses? Tours of our sacred lands etc?
When they are well set up and run, there are some great examples out there...but sadly not many.
I had faith that the permit system would be largely scrapped. Perhaps communities could have applied to have had them reinstated on say a 12 month basis, should there really be a need.

But nope.
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Reply By: Member - Kim M (VIC) - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 22:01

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 22:01
Turee Creek to Mt Vernon would have to be the most difficult country I've crossed in the last few years. I wouldn't do it again unless I had an old Toyota Ute, air support (in some sections) and ability to map the co-ordinates.

The area has no tracks, and you need a vehicle capable of bashing through the bush surrounding the numerous creeks. Some of which require hours of axe work to get through.

The country constantly changes. Originally we had to find our way over an escarpment, then through areas where the lead car would get lost within 50m. At times we came across evidence of Out Stations. Nothing left anymore apart from old stock posts and a bit of wire.

We did this trip a bit different from most people. A lot of time was spent searching old maps through Libraries, Shires and talking to locals to find the original cattle route down to Meekatharra.

It did'nt end there. After Mt Vernon we headed down to Milgun then turned right accross station tracks to have a talk to mustering crews.

Would I do it again? Yes, if somebody want's to pay for it.....!

Regards

Kim




AnswerID: 295487

Reply By: Robin Miller - Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 22:18

Saturday, Mar 29, 2008 at 22:18
Driven a lot of places and I could pretty well guarantee that many of the hardest tracks to explore are within an 90min of melbourne , and are open all year round.

I wouldn't even come looking without, twin diff locks , good mud tyres, a winch, chains and a rescue plan.

Robin Miller

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AnswerID: 295495

Reply By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 02:35

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 02:35
Depends on what you call difficult it can have qite a few meanings
this one was no picnic

AnswerID: 295513

Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 06:54

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 06:54
Which tyres were you running there, Davoe......Bridgestone 694's???
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 08:47

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 08:47
Hey Davoe,
I like the last photo of beer o'clock :-))))))

Cheers
phil
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Follow Up By: Member - JohnR (Vic)&Kath - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 10:41

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 10:41
Looks like splits and skinnies do go flat after all. It does look like beer o'clock Phil
Cheers,
Who?
John

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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 12:15

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 12:15
Definitly wasnt beer o clock. That was about 2 in the arvo. You cant see the tyre I was fixing but you can se the flat rear. 3 flats means you go no where till there fixed. Thats why the Geo is pitching in.
The were Dunlop DR2 12 ply tyres and they were no match for the burnt off bush that was there. Like knives it was . When I jumped out I got one in the shin that went straight to the bone and I picked out peices a fortnight later, We got 10 flats that week but not one tyre was wrecked
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 22:58

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 22:58
Davoe,
I had to dig back to 1978 to find a photo of the last time I did 3 tyres in a day. As you can see back then, we had some pretty flash equipment :-)) They were Uniroyal Steelcats!
Image Could Not Be Found
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Monday, Mar 31, 2008 at 00:36

Monday, Mar 31, 2008 at 00:36
Gotta love that 70s hair,

Funny actually i pulled up and the geo asked i i was going to walk with her . i usually did but i noticed the tyres looking lika a porcupine so i declined and said ive got to look after the tyres.
as i was pulling stakes out i heard a hissing so started fixing the tyre. I was 1/2 way through when i saw another flat then the geo returned and said 'whats up" I said cupla flats then she said well whats that and ponted to the 3rd.
You can see unburnt in the back ground so after the repairs we wernt straight there and bushsmashed our way back.
3/4 of the trip was recent burn and there was alot of damage panels, fuel lines radiators, steering rods air con belts and 10 tyres
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FollowupID: 561746

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 09:01

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 09:01
Like Willem says, where there are no tracks.

Madigan Line in the North Simpson has been that for me. Everyone I know who's done it won't do it again. There's a write up by Greg Cartan of our last effort in 4wdMonthly Oct2007; No111 page 166.
AnswerID: 295530

Reply By: Member - Footloose - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 12:18

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 12:18
There are so many variables in this question. eg. Using what vehicle with what gear? Or were you thinking stock?

For a nice shakeout cruise, up the Tanami and turn left across to Well 33 on the CSR. Across the Kidson Track to 80 mile Beach, up to Broome, across to Halls Creek and down the CSR coming back across the Gunbarrel or Connie Sue.

Or you could just go 50km into the bush and break something big time with no communications or passing traffic, that could make it a tough track :))
AnswerID: 295565

Reply By: Member - DOZER- Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 15:39

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 15:39
I remember an article in a 4wd mag a decade ago or so, where a day trip in a 70 series with splitties resulted in two flats 20 kms off the beaten track, many attempts to repair the tyres later, the occupants of the cruiser made it back running on 3 tyres plus a split rim minus locking rim....amazing how it sat on the road with no tyre...like it was designed to do that should it be required...
Andrew

b4 you bag me out, walk a mile in my shoes, then your a mile away and have my shoes :)

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Classifieds: Bt50/Ranger Speedy grande2 18x8 alloys (x4), Landcruiser 200 series/100 series 4 alloy rims with tyres and nuts GC

AnswerID: 295596

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 15:47

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 15:47
Andrew,
Our aboriginal friends do that all the time. Heaps of trashed rims by the roadside between here and WA, with a slither of shredded tyre on them.

I know someone who went bush in someone else's vehicle for a couple of hours. One flat tyre (splittie) and they discovered no wheelbrace. Ended up jacking it up and managed to repair it on the vehicle.
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Follow Up By: Member - Footloose - Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 16:01

Sunday, Mar 30, 2008 at 16:01
Andrew, one fella out near Kintore did that with a Troopie for 20K. No wheel brace etc. When I heard his vehicle coming I thought he was hitting the corros really hard. Talk about a square rim!
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